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How The Naked South makes dinner easy, fun, and light

There are two things I’m always looking to do to make dinner fun, easy, and not too heavy: 1. Turn appetizers into meals, and 2. Make it on the grill. This recipe accomplishes both. Anyone who doesn’t despise mushrooms enjoys them stuffed. (I’ve heard those mushroom-hating people are out there, but I choose to believe that’s an urban myth, because who could truly despise mushrooms?) Stuffed things are just superior to non-stuffed things in general. Quail, pizza crusts, stockings — all benefit from adding the word stuffed. Mushrooms are no exception. These were inspired by my love for pizza and my love for not feeling how I do after I eat pizza.

Key Components:

I’m so excited to talk to you about coconut aminos. This product is truly amazing (until research comes out that it’s bad, which is always possible).  It’s the sap tapped directly out of the coconut tree and aged with sea salt, creating a sort of sweet and salty soy sauce without the soy. It’s naturally abundant in 17 amino acids (the building blocks of protein), B-vitamins, vitamin C, minerals, and a probiotic! And it tastes delicious, addictingly so. In case you’re wondering, amino acids are important because they repair and rebuild muscle tissue, help to enhance overall brain and nervous system function, and assist in boosting the immune system and physical energy levels. Find it next to the soy sauce and tamari in health food stores such as Earth Origins and Whole Foods.

Millet is an underutilized, gluten-free grain that is as versatile as it healthy. It can be soft and creamy or slightly crunchy and fluffy, depending on how you cook it. One thing that sets millet apart from other healthy grains is its particularly high content of magnesium, which research shows can lower high blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart attack.

If you are someone who doesn’t consider mushrooms a favorite food, you may want to reconsider. Mushrooms are so good for you. Most interestingly, research is finding that Portobello mushrooms provide vitamin B12, which is typically reserved for animal products and is an important vitamin to include if you’re eating more vegetarian meals. Mushrooms are amazing for immune system support and are anti-inflammatory. They’re also rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidant boosting phytonutrients.

Millet-Stuffed Mushrooms with Tomatoes and Mozzarella

Yield: Makes 4 mushrooms

Millet-Stuffed Mushrooms with Tomatoes and Mozzarella

Ingredients

  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 packed cup arugula, lightly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon coconut aminos
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, cubed
  • Sea salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 cup cooked millet (or cooked quinoa)
  • 4 large Portobello caps, gently wiped clean
  • Basil, for serving
  • Toasted rustic bread, for serving (optional)

Instructions

  1. To cook the millet: Rinse ½ cup millet thoroughly. Combine with 1 cup water and pinch salt in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer, cover and cook 15 minutes. Turn off heat, place dry paper towels under lid and let sit 5 minutes. Fluff with fork.
  2. Combine tomatoes, arugula, olive oil, coconut aminos, and garlic in a large bowl. Add cheese and season with salt and pepper. Add cooked millet (or quinoa) to tomato mixture and toss to combine.
  3. Prepare a grill for medium heat. Season mushrooms with salt and pepper. Fill each with tomato-millet mixture and carefully transfer to grill.
  4. Cover grill and cook until cheese melts, about 4 minutes. (This can also be made in an oven set to broil. Arrange mushrooms on a baking sheet and transfer to oven and cook until cheese melts.) Top with basil leaves and serve over toasted bread, if desired..
http://ediblenetwork.com/sarasota/recipes/how-the-naked-south-makes-dinner-easy-fun-and-light/

Recipe Editor Charlotte Abrams serves up weekly recipes for "inspired food your body will appreciate" in her new column. The Naked South.About The Naked South with Charlotte Abrams
Charlotte’s mission is to teach, inspire, and empower you to make small changes toward a healthier diet while enjoying all the deliciousness food has to offer. The healthy eating “rules” are always changing and everyone’s body has a different relationship with food, so The Naked South focuses on variety and moderation. No rules, no judgment, just inspired food your body will appreciate.

 

 

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It’s salad season in The Naked South

With summer officially here, it’s time to fully embrace the season of salads. Cool, refreshing, hydrating, and light, salads are the perfect food to fuel your summer activities. I created this cabbage and corn mixture to hold up well whether it’s being knocked around in a cooler, hanging out in the refrigerator for a couple days, or sitting out in the sun. It stays crisp and satisfying despite the elements, and it’s tasty too. I like to eat this salad as a cool complement to anything off the grill, or with chilled shrimp or crab mixed right in.

Cabbage and corn salad with pecans and Parmesan

Key Components

Did you know cabbage helps detoxify your body? I just learned this and have added it to the list of cabbage’s amazing health benefits, including cancer-fighting powers and tons of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. Eating it raw, like we are in this recipe, is the best way to get the most out of this vegetable.

Arugula, cabbage’s cousin, is the most nutritious salad green you can eat. Plus it has a robust flavor that rounds out any dish. Once again, raw is best.

Along with a delicious buttery and sweet flavor, pecans offer a lot of health benefits. Rich in fatty acids and antioxidants, pecans help keep our hearts healthy and protect against cancer. They are high in fat but make up for it by warding off hunger and protecting our skin from free radical damage.

Cabbage and Corn Salad with Pecans and Parmesan

Yield: Makes 4 servings

Cabbage and Corn Salad with Pecans and Parmesan

Ingredients

  • ½ medium head cabbage
  • 2 ears corn, cooked and cooled
  • ¾ cup very finely chopped arugula
  • 1 celery rib, finely chopped
  • ½ cup pecans, very finely chopped
  • ¼ cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (see note)
  • 1½ tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more if needed
  • 1½ tablespoons fresh lemon juice, plus more if needed
  • Pinch sugar
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper

Instructions

  1. Use the large holes of a box grater to shred cabbage; you should have about 2½ cups. Place shredded cabbage in a large bowl.
  2. Cut corn kernels from cob and add to cabbage. Add arugula, celery, pecans, and cheese. Toss to combine.
  3. Add oil, lemon juice, and sugar. Taste and add more oil or lemon juice as needed to moisten.
  4. Season with salt and pepper and serve.

Notes

Whenever I call for a "finely grated" ingredient, I want you to use a Microplane grater. If you don't have one, pick one up at most grocery or kitchen stores. It's a very handy tool.

http://ediblenetwork.com/sarasota/recipes/its-salad-season-in-the-naked-south/

Recipe Editor Charlotte Abrams serves up weekly recipes for "inspired food your body will appreciate" in her new column. The Naked South.About The Naked South with Charlotte Abrams
Charlotte’s mission is to teach, inspire, and empower you to make small changes toward a healthier diet while enjoying all the deliciousness food has to offer. The healthy eating “rules” are always changing and everyone’s body has a different relationship with food, so The Naked South focuses on variety and moderation. No rules, no judgment, just inspired food your body will appreciate.

 

 

 

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What to grill for a long weekend in The Naked South

Whenever I contemplate becoming a sworn vegetarian, I think of shrimp. Shrimp make me happy. Maybe because my grandma (the love of my life) has a thing for them, too. And Ursula. Remember that scene in The Little Mermaid when Ursula grabs the lazy shrimp (or shrimp-looking creature anyway) that didn’t scurry away from her approaching hand and devours it? That part always made me hungry. And like many women in their 30s, The Little Mermaid and my grandma are pretty much responsible for the person I am today.

With Memorial Day weekend coming up, I figured it was time to take matters into my own tentacles (that one was for the true fans) and make a grilled dish that both my grandma and I will be more than happy to sink our teeth into. Plus, Florida peaches are still going strong, so get them while you can. I’ve been finding them at the Farmers’ Market, Whole Foods, and Detwiler’s.

Key Components: 

Herbs like cilantro and basil are time-honored for being antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and supporting heart health. Making a chimichurri or pesto sauce is a great way to get a concentration of these healthy benefits. 

Shrimp are a surprisingly healthy choice when choosing animal proteins. Most notably is their high concentration of the antioxidant selenium, which prevents cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and depression. Although shrimp are high in cholesterol, recent research has not concluded whether or not shrimp should be avoided because of cholesterol levels. It is known, however, that shrimp have a beneficial ratio of omega-3 to omega-6, which is important in combating obesity and high blood pressure. Eating animal proteins in moderation is always the best way to limit health concerns. To find out which shrimp are the most environmentally friendly, visit seafoodwatch.org. 

Rich in fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, peaches are among the most beneficial fruits. Especially the skin. This can be tricky, though, as peaches are often heavily sprayed with pesticides to protect the sweet, delicate flesh from bugs. And finding organic peaches can be a challenge. I recommend seeking out a local farmer who opts not to spray their fruit. King Family Farm in Bradenton is a good resource, but not always easy to get your hands on. If you can’t find someone who doesn’t spray, then you may want to peel the skin off to minimize exposure, or scrub the peaches well to at least get the residue off the surface. Since the season is so short, I accept the pesticide risk and enjoy one of nature’s most delicious fruits. I think you should, too.  

Grilled Shrimp and Peaches with Basil Chimichurri

Yield: Makes 2 main course servings, or 4 as an appetizer or accompaniment

Grilled Shrimp and Peaches with Basil Chimichurri

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup packed basil
  • ¼ cup packed cilantro
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil, plus more for grilling
  • 2 scallions, roughly chopped, plus more for garnish
  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt, plus more for seasoning
  • 1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 4 peaches, pitted and quartered
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Combine basil, cilantro, oil, scallions, garlic, lemon juice, water, and salt in a blender. Blend until smooth. Set chimichurri aside.
  2. Heat grill to high. Thread shrimp and peaches on grill-safe skewers. Season with salt and pepper and drizzle with oil. Grill until shrimp are cooked through, about 2 minutes per side.
  3. Arrange skewers on a serving platter and drizzle with chimichurri.
http://ediblenetwork.com/sarasota/recipes/what-to-grill-for-a-long-weekend-in-the-naked-south/

Recipe Editor Charlotte Abrams serves up weekly recipes for "inspired food your body will appreciate" in her new column. The Naked South.About The Naked South with Charlotte Abrams
Charlotte’s mission is to teach, inspire, and empower you to make small changes toward a healthier diet while enjoying all the deliciousness food has to offer. The healthy eating “rules” are always changing and everyone’s body has a different relationship with food, so The Naked South focuses on variety and moderation. No rules, no judgment, just inspired food your body will appreciate.

 

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Summertime is coming soon to The Naked South

Local watermelon has arrived at the farmers’ market just in time to help us cope with the heat. The arrival of watermelon lets me know it’s time to buy a new swimsuit, because summer-like weather is quickly approaching — and the only way to beat the heat in the South is to stay wet. And to eat watermelon; see below for why.

In this week’s recipe, I put a spin on a classic summer salad pairing: watermelon and feta.  

Watermelon with Feta & Cayenne

Key Components:

When it gets hot, it’s important to stay hydrated — watermelon to the rescue! This warm weather-loving fruit is over 90% water, helping to keep us hydrated when we start sweating. It’s also high in vitamin C, phytonutrients like lycopene (awesome for heart health), and antioxidant carotenoids, making this a surprisingly anti-inflammatory and healthful fruit. This is news to me! The riper the watermelon, the healthier it is, and the best way to know if you’re getting a perfectly ripe watermelon is to trust the farmer you’re getting it from. Luckily for us, there are local farmers who can help you out with that, such as Worden Farm.

Microgreens are the baby sprouts of vegetables and herbs, usually harvested within the first two weeks of growth. Yes, they are a somewhat annoying restaurant trend, but don’t let that stop you from making them a part of your diet. They are too healthy to dismiss! Some varieties have up to 40 times the nutritional content of their fully-grown counterparts! Think of them as juiced-up superfoods.

Cayenne pepper is one of nature’s hardest-working medicines. From easing cold and flu symptoms, preventing migraines, and relieving allergies; to aiding digestion, preventing blood clots, and supporting weight loss, this spice is one worth having on hand and using often.

Watermelon with Feta and Cayenne

Yield: Makes 4 servings (2 slices per person)

Watermelon with Feta and Cayenne

Ingredients

  • 2-pound piece of watermelon, sliced into 1-inch-thick rounds
  • 3 ounces feta cheese, crumbled
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped mint
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped scallions
  • Juice and zest of ½ lemon or lime
  • Handful microgreens or sprouts
  • Cayenne pepper, to taste
  • Sea salt, optional

Instructions

  1. Cut each watermelon round into 4 triangles. (If watermelon is already quartered, simply slice into wedges.) Arrange on a serving platter.
  2. Combine feta, mint, and scallions in a small bowl. Squeeze lemon over watermelon slices.
  3. Top with feta mixture, microgreens, and a tiny pinch of cayenne. Season with salt, if necessary (the feta may provide enough salt, depending on the brand). Serve immediately.
http://ediblenetwork.com/sarasota/recipes/summertime-is-coming-soon-to-the-naked-south/

Recipe Editor Charlotte Abrams serves up weekly recipes for "inspired food your body will appreciate" in her new column. The Naked South.About The Naked South with Charlotte Abrams
Charlotte’s mission is to teach, inspire, and empower you to make small changes toward a healthier diet while enjoying all the deliciousness food has to offer. The healthy eating “rules” are always changing and everyone’s body has a different relationship with food, so The Naked South focuses on variety and moderation. No rules, no judgment, just inspired food your body will appreciate.

 

 

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Cauliflower “Couscous” from The Naked South

Cauliflower is out-of-control popular right now, especially in recipes where it replaces a grain, like the ubiquitous cauliflower “rice.” Before this fad disappears, I want to share a “couscous” variation. The flavor combination going on in this recipe is surprisingly delicious — allspice, raisins, lemon, chickpeas! We’re kind of all over the place, but it works!

Cauliflower couscous platter

Key Components

Cauliflower is high in antioxidants and has cancer-fighting powers. Like its cousin, cabbage, it contains a hefty amount of glucosinolates (an organic compound containing sulfur), which are the reason for their pungent smell but also why they’re so good for you! A lot of the vital nutrients and compounds found in cauliflower are lost during transportation and storage, so this is a great vegetable to seek out locally. It’s typically available in Sarasota during winter and spring. Cauliflower is also one of those vegetables that loses nutrients the longer it’s cooked, especially when boiled or blanched. But don’t worry, I’ve taken that into consideration when writing this recipe.

Shallots are in the allium family with garlic and onions. They are a powerful bunch, shallots being one of the best cancer-fighters out there. In fact, they have six times more phytonutrients than a typical onion (not to say onions aren’t loaded with them — they certainly are). Phytonutrients are natural chemicals in plants that help protect the plant from environmental threats. What’s really is cool is that when we eat plants loaded with these phytonutrients, they help to protect us from disease too!

Allspice comes from the dried berry of a pepper tree native to tropical climates. There is no heat to this spice, but like most spices, it is very good for you. I like to use a lot of dried, ground spices in my cooking because of the concentration of beneficial properties, from being anti-inflammatory to packing a punch of minerals and vitamins. Plus they add layers of flavor that wake up your taste buds.

Chickpeas (or garbanzo beans) are so good for you that listing all the benefits would make this post entirely too long. I will tell you that they are a great source of protein, fiber, and iron. They help balance blood sugar and are particularly helpful for postmenopausal women, helping to minimize hot flashes and protecting against breast cancer and osteoporosis. And here’s some really great news: Canned beans are even better for you than soaking and cooking your own! What?! The heat of the canning process enhances the antioxidant power. Just be sure to buy an organic brand, preferably in a pouch or box versus an actual can to avoid BPA exposure.

Cauliflower “Couscous”

Serving Size: Serves 4

Cauliflower “Couscous”

Ingredients

    Couscous ingredients:
  • 1 large head cauliflower, broken into florets (about 5 cups)
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil
  • 2 large shallots, minced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • ¼ teaspoon allspice
  • ½ cup golden raisins
  • ¼ cup parsley, finely chopped
  • Zest of 1 lemon, plus 1 tablespoon juice
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Roasted Chickpeas (see below)
  • Roasted Chickpeas with Turmeric:
  • 2½ cups cooked garbanzo beans, rinsed
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin oil
  • ½ teaspoon ground turmeric
  • Coarse salt

Instructions

    First, get the chickpeas going in the oven:
  1. Heat oven to 400°. Line a large, rimmed baking sheet with paper towels, spread beans on towels, and blot dry. Removing moisture helps the beans get really crispy. Discard paper towels.
  2. Use your hands to toss beans with olive oil, turmeric, and salt to taste. Roast until crispy and browned, 35–45 minutes, shaking the pan occasionally.
  3. To prepare the couscous:
  4. Transfer half the cauliflower florets to the bowl of a food processor. Pulse rapidly until it resembles couscous. Do not over-process or it will turn to mush. Transfer to a bowl and repeat with remaining cauliflower.
  5. Combine oil, shallots, and garlic in large, nonstick (see note #1) skillet over low heat. Cook until garlic is fragrant and shallots soften, about 5 minutes. Add allspice and raisins and cook until warmed through and raisins plump.
  6. Add cauliflower "couscous," parsley, lemon zest, and juice. Season with salt and pepper, and toss until thoroughly combined and warmed through. I like to leave the cauliflower on the raw side, but you can cook it longer if you prefer. Serve topped with roasted chickpeas.

Notes

1. Great nonstick skillet choices include a well-seasoned cast iron skillet, or do a little research and find a nonstick skillet that in also nontoxic -- they're out there.
2. If you don't have allspice in the house, don't buy it just for this recipe. Try using a pinch of cinnamon or cloves instead.
3. Make sure to buy organic raisins and check the ingredients if you are avoiding sulfur dioxide (a sulfite preservative) found in most dried fruits. Or try chopping up some fresh grapes to replace the raisins in this recipe.

http://ediblenetwork.com/sarasota/recipes/the-naked-south-cauliflower-couscous/

 Recipe Editor Charlotte Abrams serves up weekly recipes for "inspired food your body will appreciate" in her new column. The Naked South.About The Naked South with Charlotte Abrams
Charlotte’s mission is to teach, inspire, and empower you to make small changes toward a healthier diet while enjoying all the deliciousness food has to offer. The healthy eating “rules” are always changing and everyone’s body has a different relationship with food, so The Naked South focuses on variety and moderation. No rules, no judgment, just inspired food your body will appreciate.

 

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Thanksgiving Side Dish Countdown: Week Three

Collard and Sausage Stuffing

Yield: Serves 6-8

Collard and Sausage Stuffing

"This time of year provides a bountiful harvest of greens, and collards are my favorite. This rich stuffing recipe is loaded with fresh collards sautéed with onion, apple, and sage. Crispy bits of browned sausage heighten the flavor, making this a perfect farm stand-meets-tradition side dish." -- Charlotte Abrams, Recipe Editor

Ingredients

  • 1-pound loaf rustic bread, cut into 1-inch cubes (about 6 cups)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided, plus more for baking dish and drizzling
  • ¾ pound fresh kielbasa sausage, casings removed
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 large apple, peeled, cored, and chopped (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped sage
  • 1 large bunch collard greens, tough stems removed and leaves chopped
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 6 large eggs
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, divided

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 400°. Arrange bread cubes in single layer on large, rimmed baking sheet. Bake in oven, tossing occasionally, until toasted, about 15 minutes.
  2. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add sausage and cook, using a wooden spoon to crumble, until browned. Use a slotted spoon to transfer sausage to plate.
  3. Add remaining tablespoon oil to skillet with sausage drippings. Add onion, apple (if using), and sage and cook until onion is slightly softened.
  4. Add collards in batches, stirring, and season with salt and pepper. Cook until onions are soft and sweet and collards are tender, about 10 minutes. Add garlic and cook for an additional 2 minutes.
  5. Combine bread, sausage, and collard mixture in large bowl. Whisk together eggs, chicken stock, and ½ cup cheese in large measuring cup or bowl. Pour over bread mixture and combine thoroughly.
  6. Transfer mixture to greased 3-quart baking dish, top with remaining ½ cup cheese, and drizzle with olive oil. Bake until golden brown and set, about 35 minutes.
http://ediblenetwork.com/sarasota/recipes/thanksgiving-side-dish-countdown-week-three/

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Thanksgiving Side Dish Countdown: Week Two

Sage-Roasted Squash and Farro Salad with Pomegranate Vinaigrette

Serving Size: Makes 6 servings

Sage-Roasted Squash and Farro Salad with Pomegranate Vinaigrette

"This week highlights the return of local butternut squash to the Farmers' Market. I wrote this recipe especially for Chef Judi, who requested a vegetarian dish that can work as a main course or side dish and highlights all the flavors of Thanksgiving. With sage, butternut squash, sweet potatoes, and a couple surprise ingredients, I think it hits the mark." -- Charlotte Abrams, Recipe Editor

Ingredients

    For the vinaigrette:
  • 2 tablespoons pomegranate molasses
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup or honey
  • 2 teaspoons white miso
  • 1 small clove garlic, minced
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • For the salad:
  • 1 small butternut squash peeled, seeds removed, and diced
  • 1 large sweet potato, peeled and diced
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped sage, plus more for garnish
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 cups cooked farro
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts, toasted
  • 1 cup pomegranate seeds
  • ½ cup crumbled blue cheese or goat cheese, optional
  • 4 cups red kale

Instructions

    First, prepare the dressing:
  1. Whisk together all ingredients until thick and homogenized.
  2. Now, to create the salad:
  3. Heat oven to 400°. Combine squash, sweet potatoes, oil, and sage on large, rimmed baking sheet. Season generously with salt and pepper. Roast until tender, about 25 minutes.
  4. Transfer to a large bowl. Add farro, half the walnuts, half the pomegranate seeds, and all but ¼ cup vinaigrette; toss to combine.
  5. Toss kale with reserved ¼ cup vinaigrette and arrange on a large serving platter. Top with roasted squash mixture.
  6. Serve topped with remaining walnuts, pomegranate seeds, blue cheese, and sage leaves.
http://ediblenetwork.com/sarasota/recipes/thanksgiving-side-dish-countdown-week-two/

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Side Dish Countdown to Turkey Day: Week One

Macaroni and Cheese with Tatsoi and Bacon-Breadcrumbs

Yield: Makes 4-6 servings

Macaroni and Cheese with Tatsoi and Bacon-Breadcrumbs

"During the next few weeks leading up to Thanksgiving, I'm going to focus the Recipe of the Week blog on Thanksgiving sides. Each recipe will feature local, in-season produce in a dish worthy of a spot on the Thanksgiving table. This week features tatsoi, a spinach-like green with a slight mustardy kick. You can find tatsoi at Worden's Farm stand at the Sarasota Farmers' Market." -- Charlotte Abrams, Recipe Editor

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces short pasta, such as gobbetti
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 large shallots, minced
  • 4 ounces cream cheese
  • 1 cup packed grated Gruyère cheese
  • 1 cup half-and-half
  • 3 cups packed tatsoi or spinach, tough stems removed
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 4 strips bacon, minced
  • ¼ cup fresh breadcrumbs
  • 1 clove garlic, minced

Instructions

  1. Cook pasta in a large pot of salted water until al dente. Drain and set aside.
  2. Heat butter in large saucepan over medium-low heat. Add shallots and cook until softened.
  3. Add cream cheese, Gruyère, and half-and-half. Cook, whisking, until cheese melts and sauce thickens.
  4. Add tatsoi and cooked pasta and stir until combined. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Turn off heat and let pasta mixture sit, tossing occasionally, while preparing breadcrumbs. This will help the pasta absorb the sauce and thicken.
  6. Place bacon in medium skillet over medium-low heat. Cook until fat is rendered and bacon is crisp. Use a slotted spoon to transfer bacon to paper towel-lined plate.
  7. Adjust heat to low; add breadcrumbs and garlic to bacon fat in skillet and cook, stirring, until breadcrumbs are golden and garlic is fragrant. Return bacon to skillet and toss to combine.
  8. Transfer pasta mixture to a serving dish. Top pasta with bacon-breadcrumbs and serve immediately.
http://ediblenetwork.com/sarasota/recipes/side-dish-countdown-to-turkey-day-week-one/

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Sausage and Chard Sourdough Stuffing

SERVES 8

INGREDIENTS

1 loaf sourdough bread, cut into ¾-inch cubes
¼ cup butter, melted
1 pound mild Italian sausage
1 medium onion, chopped
1 bunch Swiss chard, stem ends trimmed, coarsely chopped (about 8 cups)
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh garlic
1¾ cups chicken broth
Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

PREPARATION

Heat oven to 350°. Toss bread with melted butter in large bowl. Spread onto large baking sheet and bake until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Set aside.

Crumble sausage into large skillet and cook over medium-high heat until browned and cooked through, 3–5 minutes. Remove meat from skillet, leaving drippings. Add onion, chard, and garlic to skillet with drippings and season with salt and pepper. Cook until chard is wilted, 5–7 minutes, then stir in cooked sausage.

Toss sausage mixture with toasted bread cubes in large bowl. Pour chicken broth over bread mixture, stirring to coat. Spread stuffing into buttered 3-quart baking dish, pressing down slightly. Cover and bake for 40 minutes. Uncover and bake until bread cubes are browned and stuffing is heated through, 10–15 minutes.

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Roasted Beet & Rosemary Tart

roastedBeetTart
Photos by Kathryn Brass-Piper

MAKES 1 (14-INCH) TART

INGREDIENTS

4 medium beets (2 red, 2 golden), scrubbed and trimmed
1 (14-ounce) package puff pastry, thawed
8 ounces mozzarella cheese, shredded
1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary
1 clove garlic, minced
Salt and freshly ground pepper
3 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
Extra virgin olive oil, for drizzling
Frisée or mixed fresh herbs, for serving

PREPARATION

Heat oven to 400°. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and bake until tender when pierced with a sharp knife, about 1 hour. Let cool slightly before using a paper towel to remove skins. Thinly slice beets and set aside.

Roll pastry into a 14-by-12-inch rectangle on a lightly floured work surface. Transfer to baking sheet. Bake until browned, about 12 minutes.

Combine mozzarella, rosemary, and garlic in small bowl. Top baked pastry with cheese mixture. Top with beets slightly overlapping. Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle goat cheese on top and drizzle with oil. Bake until cheese melts and edges brown, about 20 minutes. Top with frisée or herbs and serve.

Recipe courtesy of Charlotte Abrams

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Blistered Shishito Peppers with Anna Maria Island Bottarga

blisterPeppers

MAKES 2–4 SERVINGS

INGREDIENTS

½ cup canola oil
4 ounces local shishito peppers
Half lemon, freshly squeezed
Maldon sea salt, to taste
Anna Maria Island bottarga, left in dehydrator overnight

PREPARATION

Heat canola oil in large, straight-side skillet until translucent and beginning to lightly smoke. Add shishito peppers and stir often. Remove peppers after skin has blistered and lightly split. Season with lemon juice and salt. Use microplane to shave dehydrated bottarga over blistered peppers.

Recipe courtesy of Jack Dusty

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Slow-Rise Sourdough Bread

sloRiseSourDough6

MAKES 1 BOULE

INGREDIENTS

3½ cups bread flour, plus more for work surface
¼ cup active sourdough starter (proofed and bubbly)
1½ cups water, room temperature
2 teaspoons sea salt
Olive oil, for oiling bowl

PREPARATION

Using a stand mixer fitted with dough hook attachment, combine flour, sourdough starter, water, and salt on medium-low speed (or stirring by hand) until ball of doughforms that cleans sides of bowl, about 3 minutes.

Place dough into large, oiled mixing bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Let rise in a warm spot in your kitchen until doubled in bulk, 8–12 hours.

Place a cast iron or enameled Dutch oven in oven, and heat to 450°.

Turn dough onto floured work surface and gently form into a boule. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise for 30 minutes.

Uncover your dough and re-form it, if necessary. Place your dough into pre-heated Dutch oven and cover with lid. Bake for 30 minutes, remove lid and continue baking until bread is browned, about 15 minutes.

Allow to cool completely before slicing and serving.

sloRiseSourDough

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Dilly Beans

dillyBeans

MAKES 4 PINTS

INGREDIENTS

2 pounds green beans
1 bell pepper
2½ cups water
2½ cups distilled white vinegar
¼ cup pickling/canning salt
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
4 teaspoons dill seed
4 cloves garlic

PREPARATION

Before you begin: Sterilize 4 pint-size canning jars and prepare two-piece canning lids according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Trim green beans so that they will fit standing up inside the pint jars. The straighter the beans, the nicer it looks in the end. Slice pepper into strips.

In a small pot over high heat, bring water, vinegar, and salt to a boil. Meanwhile, into each pint jar, add ¼ teaspoon cayenne, 1 teaspoon dill seed, and 1 clove garlic.

Pack green beans and pepper strips into jars. You want these to be pretty tightly packed, but with enough room for the liquid you’ll be adding.

Pour the boiling liquid into the pint jars, leaving ½-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel; adjust the twopiece metal canning lids.

Process jars in a boiling water canner for five minutes. Let the dilly beans stand at least 3 weeks before opening. Refrigerate after opening.

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Grandma’s Sweet Cornbread

MAKES A 9-BY-13-INCH PAN

INGREDIENTS

2 cups yellow cornmeal
½ cup all-purpose flour
⅔ cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1½ cups heavy cream
½ cup water
1 (14-ounce) can condensed milk
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
4 tablespoons butter, melted

PREPARATION

Heat 9-by-13-inch baking pan in a 425° oven. Combine cornmeal, flour, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Sift in baking powder and baking soda. In separate large bowl, combine cream, water, condensed milk, and eggs.

Add wet mixture to dry ingredients and mix thoroughly. Stir in melted butter. Remove pan from oven, coat with nonstick cooking spray, and pour in cornbread mixture. Carefully cover with foil and return to oven for 20 minutes. Uncover and cook until golden and just set, about 10 additional minutes. Do not overcook, it will firm up as it cools.

Recipe courtesy of Blue Marlin

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Apple Stacks

appleStacks

MAKES 3–4 STACKS

INGREDIENTS

1 large Granny Smith apple
½ cup peanut butter
¼ cup all natural granola

PREPARATION

Core apple, removing seeds and stem. Slice apple crosswise into ¼-inch thick rounds. Combine peanut butter and granola. Sandwich 2 apple slices with about 2 tablespoons peanut butter mixture.

Enjoy!

Recipe courtesy of Get Fit Fuel:
2063 Siesta Dr, Sarasota; 941-554-4567; getfitfuel.com
8327 Market St, Sarasota; 941-961-8207; getfitfuel.com

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