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Archive | Beverages

Summer Fruit Tonic

sumFruitTonic

RECIPE BY CHARLOTTE ABRAMS
PHOTO BY KATHRYN BRASS- PIPER

Makes 8 servings

1 bottle Pinot Grigio
1 bottle ginger beer (such as Goya)
½ cup elderflower liqueur (such as St. Germain)
Juice of 1 lime
3 cups chopped pineapple
2 cups sliced mango
1 cup pitted lychees
1 cup fresh cilantro, basil, or mint

In a large pitcher, gently combine wine, ginger beer, elderflower liqueur, and lime juice. Add remaining ingredients and gently mash with a wooden spoon to release juices. Transfer to refrigerator and let chill for at least 1 hour, up to one day. Serve over ice.

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The “other” white milk

Almond Mylk

Yield: Makes 3½ cups

Almond Mylk

"A new genre of milk has hit the food scene, and it has nothing to do with a cow. Concerns of animal welfare, lactose intolerance, and sensitivities to casein (the primary milk protein) have prompted consumers to seek out alternatives to dairy.

Enter mylk. This dairy-free beverage is made from coconuts, tree nuts (like almonds and cashews), and a variety of seeds from hemp to sesame. But it’s the almond variety that has become the favorite choice for everyday use among dedicated mylk drinkers. It’s creamy without being rich and has a mild, nutty flavor, making it extremely versatile. From pouring over cereal to making béchamel for macaroni and cheese, almond mylk can do it all.

Making your own is simple, it only takes about 10 minutes to do, and it’s intensely more delicious than typical grocery store varieties, not to mention free of the additives found in most conventional brands. Do-it-yourselfers beware: Once you give this a whirl, consider yourself a mylk convert." -- Charlotte Abrams, Recipe Editor

Ingredients

  • 1 cup whole almonds, preferably raw or steam pasteurized
  • 3½ cups filtered water
  • Click here for ingredients and instructions for vanilla, chocolate and strawberry mylk variations!

Instructions

  1. To prepare almonds, place in a large bowl and cover with water. Let soak overnight. Drain water and rinse before using. Place soaked almonds in a powerful blender, such as a Vitamix.
  2. Add 3½ cups filtered water and blend on high until completely smooth, about 1 minute.
  3. Slowly pour mixture into a nut milk bag set over a large bowl. Squeeze bottom of bag to extract mylk. (Do not discard almond pulp, freeze to use later for baking or making smoothies.) Transfer mylk to a glass jar and refrigerate. Shake well before drinking. Best served very cold.

Notes

Charlotte highly recommends purchasing a nut milk bag, as it makes the process of homemade mylks much easier. A variety of choices can be found online.

Not ready to commit to homemade mylk-making but still want to see what all the fuss is about? Not to worry, Sarafresh Juice (sarafresh.com) and CROP (cropjuicesrq.com) both offer their own unique versions of fresh and additive-free almond mylks for purchase. Be prepared to be addicted.

http://ediblenetwork.com/sarasota/recipes/the-other-white-milk/

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Basic Almond Mylk – Vanilla Variation

vanillaAlmondMylk

INGREDIENTS

1 recipe Basic Almond Mylk
4–6 large, pitted dates
½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract
¼ teaspoon sea salt

PREPARATION

Combine mylk, dates, vanilla, and salt in a powerful blender. Blend on high until smooth. For a creamier texture, pour through a fine-mesh strainer. Shake well before drinking. Best served very cold.

Try adding ½ cup hulled strawberries to the blender to make strawberry mylk, or 2 tablespoons cocoa powder to make chocolate mylk.

 

“I said to the almond tree, ”Friend, speak to
me of God,” and the almond tree blossomed.”
-Nikos Kazantzakis

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Basic Almond Mylk

almondMylk

Makes 3½ cups

INGREDIENTS

1 cup whole almonds, preferably raw or steam pasteurized
3½ cups filtered water

PREPARATION

To prepare almonds, place in a large bowl and cover with water. Let soak overnight. Drain water and rinse before using. Place soaked almonds in a powerful blender, such as a Vitamix.

Add 3½ cups filtered water and blend on high until completely smooth, about 1 minute.

Slowly pour mixture into a nut milk bag set over a large bowl. Squeeze bottom of bag to extract mylk. (Do not discard almond pulp, freeze to use later for baking or making smoothies.) Transfer mylk to a glass jar and refrigerate. Shake well before drinking. Best served very cold.

NOTE: I highly recommend purchasing a nut milk bag, it makes the process of homemade mylks much easier. A variety of choices can be found online.

Where to Buy:

Not ready to commit to homemade mylk-making but still want to see what all the fuss is about? Not to worry, Sarafresh Juice (sarafresh.com) and CROP (cropjuicesrq.com) both offer their own unique versions of fresh and additive-free almond mylks for purchase. Be prepared to be addicted.

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Chocolate for breakfast in The Naked South

I have a confession to make: In the not-too-distant past I was hooked on chocolate Carnation instant breakfast packets. They’re just so easy and sweet and chocolatey. But as I learned about nutrition and started paying attention to ingredients, I realized I can make a healthier choice without much more effort. 

Breakfast can be tricky — picky eaters, time restraints, grogginess. Despite the obstacles, my advice is to do your best to keep it healthy, because your first meal sets the tone for the entire day. This chocolate shake is my current favorite way to start the day, and my son and husband love it too. It’s easy and sweet with some powerhouse ingredients to fuel your morning.  


Key Components
   

Soaked whole almonds are one of the best foods you can eat. Why soaked? Because it makes them easier to digest and therefore better for you. Soaking almonds is so simple. Just do it. See the recipe note to learn how. Anyway, almonds are awesome — good for your heart and filling, too.

Coconut water is a natural source of electrolytes (super hydrating) and potassium, plus it tastes great.

Hemp seeds are a good source of protein. They also come loaded with vitamins and minerals that provide sustaining energy, which is nice in the morning.

Dates are mostly sugar but they also provide a hefty dose of fiber and essential minerals, making them a healthy choice for sweetening.

Cacao (or cocoa) powder is ground from the bean from which chocolate is made. In its natural state it is a powerful antioxidant that boosts energy, supports heart health, and protects our bodies from free-radical damage.

Cinnamon reduces inflammation and fights bacteria, but mostly it just tastes good.

Chocolate Breakfast Shake

Yield: Makes 1 large serving (or enough to share with a wee one)

Chocolate Breakfast Shake

Ingredients

  •  ¼ cup soaked whole almonds (preferably raw)
  • 1 cup coconut water
  • ½ cup unsweetened almond milk
  • ½ ripe banana
  • 1 tablespoon shelled hemp seeds (or hemp hearts)
  • 1 pitted large date, such as Medjool
  • 1 teaspoon cacao powder (preferably raw)
  • Pinch sea salt (preferably Celtic or Himalayan)
  • Pinch ground cinnamon
  • Handful ice cubes

Instructions

  1. Combine almonds, coconut water, almond milk, banana, hemp seeds, date, cacao, salt, and cinnamon in a powerful blender.
  2. Blend until completely smooth -- it takes about 30 seconds on high in a Vitamix.
  3. Add ice and quickly blend again to chill. Serve immediately.  

Notes

Keeping soaked almonds on hand in the refrigerator makes healthy snacking and breakfast a cinch. Simply place a couple cups of almonds in a large jar or container with a lid, cover with filtered water, and place in the fridge overnight. The almonds will soften, making them easier to digest and to blend into delicious milk and shakes. Keep stored in water in the refrigerator for up to a week or so, changing the water when you think of it.  

http://ediblenetwork.com/sarasota/recipes/chocolate-for-breakfast-in-the-naked-south/

 Recipe Editor Charlotte Abrams serves up weekly recipes for "inspired food your body will appreciate" in her new column. The Naked South.About The Naked South with Charlotte Abrams
Charlotte’s mission is to teach, inspire, and empower you to make small changes toward a healthier diet while enjoying all the deliciousness food has to offer. The healthy eating “rules” are always changing and everyone’s body has a different relationship with food, so The Naked South focuses on variety and moderation. No rules, no judgment, just inspired food your body will appreciate.

 

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Typsy Gypsy Cocktail

MAKES 8 CUPS

4 cups blood orange juice
2 cups Absolut Hibiskus vodka
1 cup honey-lavender simple syrup
(recipe follows)
1 cup champagne
Combine juice, vodka, and simple syrup in large pitcher or bowl and chill. Add champagne just before serving.

Honey-Lavender Simple Syrup

MAKES ABOUT 1 CUP

½ cup water
½ cup orange blossom honey
1⁄3 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon culinary lavender

Bring water, honey, and sugar to a boil over medium-high heat. Add lavender. Reduce heat and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. The syrup is done when it coats a spoon. Remove from heat and pour through a fine-mesh strainer to remove lavender.

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Bohemian Sapphire

MAKES 1 COCKTAIL

2 ounces Bombay Sapphire
½ ounce Sauvignon blanc (preferably from Marlborough New Zealand)
½ ounce Bénédictine
Dash of Peychaud’s bitters
Dash of Angostura bitters
Grapefruit zest

PREPARATION

Stir all ingredients until properly diluted. Pour into a chilled glass. Perfume glass with grapefruit zest.

NOTE: This is my version of a Martinez cocktail, the precursor of the martini. The original calls for a malty gin, sweet vermouth, Luxardo Maraschino, and orange bitters. In my version I make a vermouth on the fly utilizing white wine, Bénédictine, and bitters to create a sweet-bitter balance.

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Fresh Lemongrass and Ginger Tea

MAKES ABOUT 2 QUARTS

This herbal tea is nice hot or iced. Include a lemongrass stalk ‘stirrer’ for a pretty presentation: Simply knot the grassy end of a stalk of fresh lemongrass, again and again, until it forms one big knot; trim off any extra leaves.

INGREDIENTS

2 quarts water
1 handful fresh lemongrass leaves and stalks, roughly chopped and bruised (about 1 cup)
3–4 thick slices fresh ginger (you don’t have to peel it, just wash it)
Raw honey (or sweetener of choice), to taste

PREPARATION

Bring water to boil in a large stockpot. Add lemongrass and ginger and boil for 2 minutes. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 10–15 minutes. Remove lemongrass and ginger (throw them in the compost). Sweeten to taste. Serve iced or hot. Store in the refrigerator for up to one week.

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Green Lemonade

MAKES 2 SERVINGS

2 cups kale, stems discarded
2 lemons, peeled
2 large apples, cored

Push all ingredients through a juicer. Alternatively, blend all ingredients in a powerful blender starting with 1 cup water until smooth, adding an additional cup of water as needed. Strain through a fine-mesh strainer.

NOTE: You can change the color of this lemonade by replacing the kale with beets for a red juice or carrots for an orange one. But don’t let your imagination stop there, have fun with it. And during cold and flu season be sure to add a chunk of ginger to the mix

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Tidewrack Martini

MAKES 1 COCKTAIL

INGREDIENTS

1¼ ounces house-infused rosemary-thyme vodka
¾ ounces dry vermouth
2 bar spoons Cointreau orange liqueur
1 bar spoon kummel (coriander seed liqueur)
3 green olives marinated in infused vodka
Oyster shell
Thyme and rosemary sprigs

PREPARATION

Shake vodka, vermouth,

Cointreau, and kummel over ice. Strain into a chilled, wide-mouth champagne flute. Garnish with olives, oyster shell, thyme and rosemary sprigs.

courtesy of Jack Dusty

 

 

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Wild Berry Infusion

MAKES 1 COCKTAIL

INGREDIENTS

1¼ ounces house-infused wild berry vodka
(raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries)
¾ ounce Chambord black raspberry liqueur
1½ ounces sweet-and-sour mix

PREPARATION

Shake all ingredients over ice. Strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with an infused raspberry and strawberry.

courtesy of Half Shell Oyster House

 

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Clementine Creamsicle

MAKES 1 COCKTAIL

INGREDIENTS

2 ounces house-infused clementine-basil vodka
1 ounce sweetened condensed milk
½ ounce simple syrup
2 ounces French vanilla cream
Fresh basil leaf
Orange twist

PREPARATION

Shake vodka, condensed milk, simple syrup, and cream over ice. Strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with basil and orange twist.

courtesy of The Table Creekside

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DAKIN DARK CHOCOLATE IRISH CREAM

dark chocolate irish cream

By Elizabeth Sniegocki

MAKES APPROXIMATELY 5 CUPS

Local dairy is fresher than what you can buy at the grocery, and it’s greener because it travels a lesser distance from farm to home, reducing the impact on the environment. This homemade Irish cream recipe uses heavy cream and milk from Dakin Dairy in Myakka City . It’s easy to make and it’s perfect for celebrating the holiday season.

INGREDIENTS

  • ¾ cups Dakin heavy cream, divided
  • ¾ cups Dakin milk
  • 1 14 ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 teaspoon instant espresso granules
  • 1½ tablespoon unsweetened dark cocoa powder
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon local honey
  • 1½ cups Irish whiskey
  • 1½ teaspoons vanilla extract

PREPARATION

In a small bowl, mix together the espresso, cocoa, cinnamon, powdered sugar, and 3 tablespoons of heavy cream. Stir until dissolved and set aside. Pour all the remaining ingredients into a large bowl, then add the cocoa espresso mixture. Use an immersion blender to incorporate all ingredients together for 20-30 seconds until smooth. Pour the Irish cream into sealable containers. Let the drink sit overnight for all the flavors to blend together. Shake before using. Store in refrigerator for up to two months.

RECYCLED PACKAGING

Recycle empty glass containers, like these repurposed maple syrup bottles, for an eco-chic way to package your Irish Cream. Dress them up with adhesive chalkboard labels and ribbon.

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