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Archive | Spring 2015

LAST BITE: WE’RE 5 AND THRIVING

lastBiteWere5

PHOTOS BY CHAD SPENCER
AND THE FANCY BOOTH BY CAT PENNENGA

Edible Sarasota celebrated its fifth anniversary on February 5 with a street party on Lemon Avenue in downtown Sarasota. The evening honored the efforts and talents of those who have supported this magazine for the past five years: the advertisers, farmers, vendors, artisans, writers, and contributors.

True to the magazine’s reputation, the food was fabulous. Guests enjoyed fresh, local fare prepared by dozens of local restaurants, food trucks, food artisans, and culinary students. VerTerra sponsored Edible with bowls, plates, and silverware that were made of compostable, fallen palm leaves and Suncoast Motorsports was the presenting sponsor.

Edible Sarasota received the Edible Communities group’s coveted Langeland Award of Excellence for outstanding community service with a $1,000 prize to be awarded to the charity of their choice. That windfall was divided between the American Diabetes Association and the All Faiths Food Bank.

Thank you to everyone who made this evening such a success. You are the ingredients that help create Edible Sarasota.

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EDIBLE JACKPOT: CHUTNEY’S ETC

Nearly Three Decades of Flavor

jackpotChutney
Owner Ashwin Shukla

WORDS BY ABBY WEINGARTEN
PHOTOS BY JENNY ACHESON

For 28 years, Denise May has served her signature chicken Masala and tomato curry entrée to a solid fan base in Sarasota’s Southside Village.

In such a transient, seasonal city—with its ever-increasing restaurant turnover—May and her husband, Ash Shukla, have made Chutney’s Etc. a household name and an independent culinary staple.

“I was a mere 24 years old when I started the restaurant. I came to Sarasota on a mission to be self-employed and in the restaurant business. Success is built on consistency.

I can’t stress that word enough,” May says. “Too many restaurants do not remain true to food quality or service. My husband and I have been completely dedicated to not only food preparation but also table service. We are the dining room staff as well as the food innovators and spice developers.”

Because of the couple’s creativity, the Chutney’s menu is rich with Middle Eastern, Greek, and Indian fare. Much of the cuisine is inspired by Shukla’s global travels, and May has been an experimental wiz in the kitchen since her youth. Patrons get hooked on specialty items, including the peanut chicken, which is “like a drug to many,” May says.

Patrons get
hooked on
specialty items,
including the
peanut chicken,
which is “like a
drug to many”

“Our hummus is made fresh daily (and very garlicky) and it is a rather notorious dip in the neighborhood,” May says. “At nighttime, we offer lamb vindaloo, which is probably hotter than anything in town but extremely popular. Really good spicy food is hard to come by in Sarasota. Even when restaurants say a dish is spicy, it is often pedestrian for many discerning palates.”

There is chicken Korma with ground cashews, cardamom, saffron, and raisins; stuffed cabbage; lamb kabobs; curried lentil soup; and mango juice to drink. Mixed in with these exotic delicacies are desserts like the authentic Big Easy–style bread pudding with whiskey sauce.

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Ash cooking one of his specialty curry dishes

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Chicken skewers grilling for many dishes on the menu

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Handmade pita breads ready to be served

All of Chutney’s food suppliers are local, as the restaurant owners are not fans of “big truck” deliveries, May says. May and Shukla shop daily for meats and produce, and on weekends they peruse the inventory at the Sarasota Farmers’ Market. Keeping the exchanges community-focused ensures that the restaurant will always serve the highest quality, homegrown ingredients. This level of consistency, as May says, is what distinguishes the eatery.

“I married my husband in 1992 and, together, we have created the business that we have in 2015,” May says. “Our unique brand and polar opposite personalities have only accented what I initially began in 1987. We have employed the same staff for over 15 years. Respect, hard work, and a family environment are essential to our success. We could not do what we do without our incredible staff.”

And Chutney’s would not be what it is today without the tenacity and integrity of May and Shukla.

“We stand out because my husband and I still ‘mind the store’ exclusively,” May says. “We are always serving and always cooking, always onsite. Not many restaurant owners can say that.”

Chutney’s Etc.
1944 Hillview St, Sarasota
941-954-4444
chutneysetc.com

RECIPE

Lamb Kefta

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Ceramic elephants are seen through-out the restaurant

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A variety of hot sauces given to Chutney’s from patrons over the years

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EDIBLE TRAVELS: FARMERS’ MARKET FINDS SPRING 2015

WORDS BY KAYE WARR
PHOTOS BY JENNY ACHESON

There’s nothing better than strolling through a farmers’ market sampling fresh jewel-toned produce and admiring beautiful handmade clothing and jewelry. The aromas in the air are intoxicating and there’s a kind of music in the easy conversations and jovial chatter. We’ve compiled a list of some of our favorite recent Farmers’ Market Finds, just in case you need convincing.

DELICIOUS GOURMET DIPS
Bradenton Farmers’ Market

travelsDip

We can’t get enough of our condiments at Edible Sarasota. Sometimes we think that bread and crackers and vegetables exist merely as vehicles for jams and sauces and dips. Our favorite dips are 100% natural and can be found at the Bradenton Farmers’ Market or ordered online from Delicious Gourmet Dips. There are over 30 delectable flavors to choose from including the tangy bite of Wasabi Lime Mustard, the savory Cheedar and Ale, and the decadent White Chocolate Raspberry.

deliciousgourmetdips.com

ESSENCE OF THE HEART
Bradenton Farmers’ Market

travelsEssence

Laura McSeaton has been a nurse for over 30 years and she’s also certified in holistic medicine and aromatherapy. Her product line features essential oils designed to promote healing and a natural approach to skin and health care. Her three goat-milk soaps—Comfort, Goddess, and Granny’s Oatmeal—feature organic ingredients such a powdered goat milk, coconut oil, spiked lavender, and raw honey. Ingredients are chosen with care and combined to maximize their healing and soothing properties.

facebook.com/essenceoftheheart

THE VERMONT SUGARBUSH
Venice Farmers’ Market

travelsVTsugar

Sarasota Farmers’ Market visitors may have noticed a sweet absence in the past couple of months. A syrupy void left by The Vermont Sugarbush owners Drew and Christina Kacik when they relocated back to Vermont. All is not lost, however, as Suzanne Andrews of Mother’s Cupboard in Venice still carries the 100% natural and sustainable “liquid gold” that is this particular maple syrup, made by a small farm in Vermont. I’m told you can also taste the syrup in cocktails at The Cottage on Siesta Key and Clasico in Downtown Sarasota.

motherscupboardspiceshoppe.com

SUNSHINE CANNING
Bradenton Farmers’ Market
Central Sarasota Farmers’ Market

travelsSunshine

Lisa Fulk remembers watching as her grandmother made jams and other treats in her kitchen as a little girl. She and her two children, Elijah and Violet, use to go strawberry picking at a local farm and one day a surplus of strawberries caused her to begin making her own jams. She soon branched out to pickling and Sunshine Canning was born. Lisa works closely with Geraldson Farms and Darwin’s Brewing Company to make gourmet pickles such as dill pickles brined in Darwin’s Summadayze IPA or kohlrabi turnips from Geraldson Farms pickled in an addictive spicy ginger brine.

sunshinecanning.com

MORGAN’S CANTEEN & COOKERY
Sarasota Farmers’ Market
Phillippi Farmhouse Market

travelsMorgan

There’s a sign on the front of mobile food vendor Morgan’s Canteen & Cookery that reads “Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Say my name. I did it for me. I liked it. I was good at it. And I was really—I was alive.” The sign gives the impression that this is a passion project and the delicious food cooked on the flat top and presented to enthusiastic patrons underscores that impression. Merritt Morgan lost his job in 2010 and decided to take the opportunity to do something that he really loved. Morgan’s is “Americana with a Twist” and the fresh, simple ingredients and varied menu—everything from omelets to gyros to frogs’ legs—keep us coming back for more.

morganscanteen.com

IMMUNESOLUTION
Phillippi Farmhouse Market

travelsImmune

Bob and Jackie Page are on a mission to rid the world of acidity. Bob and Jackie have been married for 25 years and Jackie opened Bob’s eyes to the shortage of healthy, clean products, and education in the American diet. Jackie managed health food stores but she couldn’t find a product that she believed was pure enough to be beneficial. One day in 2004 she stumbled upon Immunesolution Wheat Grass Elixir at a flea market and she experienced a “Eureka!” moment. This elixir is truly magical, as Bob will tell you, brimming with vitality and enthusiasm as he extolls the virtues of the Organic Kamut Blend. “We sell this product because we’ve seen the results. People feel better, they look better, and that makes us happy”.

immunesolution.com

 

FARMERS MARKETS

BOCA GRANDE

Boca Grande Farmers’ Market
305 Wheeler Rd
Friday 9:30am- 1:30pm
October-April
Bocagrandefarmersmarket.com

BRADENTON

Bradenton Farmers’ Market
Old Main St (12th St W)
Saturday 9am–2pm
October–May
bradentonfarmersmarket.com

Bridge Street Market
Historic Bridge St
Sunday 10am–3pm
November–April
bridgestreetmerchants.com

ELLENTON

Ellenton Farmers’ Market
6750 US 301(Rocky Blu­ Library)
Saturday 9am–2pm
Year Round

Ellenton Sunday Market
5309 29th St E (Ice & Sports Complex)
Sunday 8am-2pm

ENGLEWOOD

Dearborn Street Market
348 W Dearborn St
Thursday 9am-2pm
October- April

Englewood Farmers’ Market
Historic Dearborn St
Thursday 9am–2pm
October–May
englewoodfarmersmarket.org

NORTH PORT

North Port Farmers’/Craft Market
14942 Tamiami Tr
Saturday 8am–2pm
Year Round
northportfarmerscraftmarket.com

PUNTA GORDA

Punta Gorda Farmers’ Market
Taylor St
Saturday 8am–1pm
Year Round

SARASOTA

Central Sarasota Farmers’ Market
4748 S Beneva Rd
Saturday 8am- 1pm
Year Round
centralsarasotafarmersmarket.com

Old Miakka Farmers’ Market
Old Miakka United Methodist Church
1620 Myakka Rd, Sarasota
Saturday 10am–2pm
Year Round

Phillippi Farmhouse Market
Phillippi Estate Park
Wednesday 9am–2pm
October–April
farmhousemarket.org

Sarasota Farmers’ Market
Main St & Lemon Ave
Saturday 7am–1pm
Year Round
sarasotafarmersmarket.org

Siesta Key Farmers’ Market
5124 Ocean Blvd
Sunday 8am–2pm
Year Round
siestafarmersmarket.com

The Market at Five Points
First St & N Pineapple Ave
( Five Points Park)
Wednesday 10am-2pm
November-April
sarasotafarmersmarket.org

VENICE

Venice Farmers’ Market
Nokomis & Tampa Ave.
Saturday 8am–12pm
Year Round
thevenicefarmersmarket.com

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BACK OF THE HOUSE: MADE IN FULL

Modern American Delicious Eats

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Made’s famous fried chicken.

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Owner and Chef, Mark Woodruff, prepping his scallop dish.

WORDS BY COOPER LEVEY-BAKER
PHOTOS BY PETER ACKER

It took decades for Made’s Mark Woodruff to become a chef and to open his own place, but he’s been deep in the restaurant industry since elementary school. “I started rolling silverware at 9 years old,” Woodruff, now 37, says with a laugh.

Food ran in the family. Woodruff grew up in Plano, Texas, where his father and stepmother operated a number of restaurants. Every summer, every holiday, Woodruff found himself helping out with the family business: “I was managing restaurants when I was 16.” With Made now celebrating two successful years in downtown Sarasota, it’s clear that experience has paid off. “If a breeze comes through the kitchen,” Woodruff says, “I know which door is opening.”

But understanding how to operate a restaurant is one thing—creating a menu is something else entirely. And while Woodruff had labored in the industry for years, eventually moving with his family to Sarasota to help run a downtown restaurant he doesn’t want me to name, until Made came along he had never put his own stamp on a menu. He wanted to change that.

Even on his days off, Woodruff wound up in the kitchen, cooking for 15 or 20 friends he’d invite over for a feast. He drew on his Texas upbringing for inspiration, and added Southern touches when it seemed right.

In 2005, after his father passed away, Woodruff realized he could afford to take a couple years off and go to culinary school. He chose one of the best: the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York.

Already 27, Woodruff found himself sharing dorm rooms with 17- and 18-year-olds. On the weekends, he would travel south to Manhattan, where he staged at world-renowned spots like Le Bernadin and Per Se, working for free and crashing with a friend. The learning process was simple: “I’d pay attention,” Woodruff says.

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Mark lowering items from his dry storage

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Eat local signs proudly displayed in the restaurant

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Scallops seasoned and ready for the skillet

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Sautee pans ready for the dinner rush

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Server, Eli Cramer, making one of Made’s signature cocktails

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Homemade waffles plated and ready for the fried chicken

After graduating and returning to Sarasota, Woodruff started looking for a spot to call his own. In 2012, he got a call with news that Brasserie Belge, a Belgian spot located next to Mediterraneo and across from the Hollywood 20, was closing up, and Woodruff sprang into action.

“Seven months later, we were open,” Woodruff says. “We opened this restaurant with $160,000 and $10,000 credit. I had to pull every favor from my friends.” With all his experience in the biz, Woodruff knew the right people to call. Getting a liquor license took just two weeks.

The guiding philosophy at Made is clear. “We make everything,” Woodruff says. Even down to the condiments. Made produces its own ketchup, mayonnaise, mustard, etc., and the kitchen even produces many of the items you find in their craft cocktails, stuff like specialty simple syrups, grilled lemons, candied ginger and homemade Bloody Mary mix.

The menu reflects the food Woodruff grew up with. Tacos stuffed with slow-roasted pork shoulder nod to Tex-Mex, while the doublefried chicken and fried cube steak represent the South. A peach barbecue glaze puts a spin on classic dry-rubbed and smoked ribs from Texas.

But the dishes never remain static. Woodruff is constantly tinkering with ingredients and proportions. His sausage gravy kept turning out bland, so instead of adding plain flour, Woodruff tried mixing in the seasoned flour he uses to fry chicken. Voilá. Managerial savvy also plays a role. The restaurant’s barbecue sauce was tying up two stockpots and two burners for six hours—shifting to making it overnight has saved time and kitchen space.

Woodruff admits he was “very nervous” to take over the Brasserie Belge space, which had been home to a number of other nowclosed spots like the coffee and gelato café Jolly and Buddha Belly Donuts. But great press and solid awards led to good traffic, and Woodruff is conscious of pricing his dishes correctly. “We stayed in the black most of the time,” Woodruff says of the restaurant’s early months.

After surviving that first year, Woodruff made a conscious decision to push himself to begin incorporating more local ingredients. “It just took me awhile to get my shit together,” he says. The restaurant now cooks with butter and heavy cream from Dakin Dairy Farms and Woodruff himself hits up the downtown Sarasota farmers’ market to purchase ingredients for Made’s popular Sunday brunch. The corn tortillas for Made’s breakfast tacos come straight from La Primavera, a Mexican grocery just up the Trail.

What’s next? Woodruff is considering opening other Mades in New Jersey and Austin, Texas. Managing restaurants longdistance could prove formidable, but Woodruff knows what he wants.

“I want that laid-back Texas don’t-give-a-shit attitude,” Woodruff says. “Everyone can come, and they’re going to sit down to something delicious.” Sounds like Made all right.

Made Restaurant
1990 Main St, Sarasota
941-953-2900
maderestaurant.com

RECIPE

Seared Scallops over Grilled Cream Corn
and Jalapeno “Risotto Style”

 

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URBAN GARDEN: HUMAN BEE-ING

Hands-on Pollinating Helps Garden Thrive

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Collecting pollen from the male flower

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Wendy Bradshaw in her garden

WORDS BY RANDI DONAHUE
PHOTOS BY CHAD SPENCER

Wendy Bradshaw offers me a glass of cold lemonade as we sit at the dining room table in her beautiful lakeside home in Bent Tree. Surrounded by the lake to the south, the neighborhood’s main street and golf course to the west, and a friendly neighbor to the east, the lot seemingly offers no space for a large, productive kitchen garden. But as we make our way to the back patio, I notice it’s abundant with produce.

Bradshaw, a nurse at the Meckler Admissions Center at Sarasota Memorial Hospital for the last 11 years, discovered gardening as therapy three years ago to escape heavy matters related to her father’s health. “It was just a really traumatic time, so … I said, ‘I just want to grow things; I want life.’”

With a love of cooking, and a little genetic instinct (her parents and grandparents grew tomatoes, among other things), and inspired by brother-in-law John Freeman’s initiation of Southside Elementary’s Earth Box garden, Bradshaw started small, growing tomatoes and cucumbers in her own Earth Boxes.

Although the boxes on Bradshaw’s screened-in patio were happy with the six hours of daily sunlight and consistent water supply, her cucumber plants would flower, but ultimately the flowers would fall off and leave her with no fruit.

“I googled it and found out I needed bees because there is a male and female flower, and they don’t pollinate by air,” says Bradshaw. “They need to touch or need an animate object to help them.”

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Mountain Magic tomatoes ready to be picked; Identifying the male and female flower

So even though the screen cage was offering protection from harmful insects, it was also preventing the plant’s symbiotic relationship with bees and other beneficial insects to help pollinate the flowers.

Instead of moving her boxes outside the screen, Bradshaw took matters into her own steady hands and began handpollinating her cucumber flowers.

“I discovered you could use a paintbrush, you could use a Q-tip, you could even actually take the male flower and unpeel it and stick him in the female flower,” she explains.

“I just go from the male to the female plant and spin it all around,” says Bradshaw as she shows me the small makeup brush she uses in addition to a “cute little paintbrush.”

She says it’s simple to tell the flowers apart: Females have a little fruit attached at the base of the flower, and males have a very long stem.

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A variety of tools used for pollinating

“I discovered you could
use a paintbrush, you
could use a Q-tip”

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Rows of earthboxes inside Wendy’s lanai

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Showing us the flicking method

Over her last six growing seasons, Bradshaw has hand-pollinated other fruits and veggies, and she is currently assisting the bees in pollinating strawberry plants she keeps in a box outside the patio.

Her extra attention has paid off, and she and her family enjoy a bounty of various fruits and veggies. In fact, she has gone from being known as “Nurse Vampire” (she draws blood and sets IVs) to “Farmer Wendy” because of all the produce she shares with co-workers.

For Bradshaw, what started as a two–Earth Box hobby is now a 10-box personal retreat lush with seasonal herbs, tomatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, sugar snap peas, and Malabar climbing spinach. That she can construct a tomato sandwich from her garden, evoking memories of summers at home with family in Canada, is her best reward.

“I love it,” she says. “It makes me so happy.”

And her beaming smile as she discusses plans to expand her urban oasis clearly conveys that her garden is no longer a hobby, but a lifestyle she hopes to be able to share with distant loved ones.

“I am growing tomatoes hoping that my father will be here one day to taste them.”

WENDY’S GARDENING TIP:

Although tomatoes are self-pollinating, you can help them to be more productive by flicking the anther up into the flower to produce better tomatoes.

RECIPE

Nurse Wendy’s Mouth-Watering Cucumber Vinaigrette

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WORTH THE TRIP: !VIVA CINCO DE MAYO!

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Sizzlin’ steak fajitas at Bodega Charley’s; Different tequilas at The Grasshopper; Artwork at El Torro Bravo. 

WORDS BY COOPER LEVEY-BAKER
PHOTO S BY KATHRYN BRASS-PIPER

Goofy me. I always thought Cinco De Mayo was Mexico’s version of our Fourth of July, the birthday of a nation and a chance to skip work and get plastered. Turns out that’s (partly) untrue.

Cinco De Mayo in fact commemorates the surprising 1862 victory of an out-manned and outgunned Mexican force over the invading French army in the southeastern district of Puebla. Today, in Mexico, the holiday is a regional one—mostly observed in Puebla with parades and reenactments.

Not so much in the United States, where in the 1960s Chicano activists made an e­ffort to popularize the holiday as a way to celebrate Mexican heritage and culture. That spirit still survives in areas with large Chicano populations, but, of course, Cinco De Mayo has taken on another connotation—as an excuse for Americans of all racial and ethnic backgrounds to down tequila and munch on Mexican cuisine. Here are a few local spots where you can do just that.

BODEGA CHARLEY’S GRILL & CANTINA

Bodega Charley’s knows how to do chips and salsa right. A basket comes out loaded with freshly fried and seasoned chips alongside a cup of shockingly scarlet salsa. That dip is incredible, fruity and sweet with a tangy bite, and even adds a nice touch if you save some and add it your tacos or enchiladas or quesadillas, the Tex-Mex standards that fill up the Bodega Charley’s menu.

The restaurant opened along Hillview last fall, in the spacious confines once occupied by Ocean Blues and a number of other previous eateries. Let’s hope Charley’s lasts longer than those past iterations. I need that salsa in my life.

Bodega Charley’s Grill & Cantina
1936 Hillview St, Sarasota
941-364-5133
bodegacharleys.com

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Mexican statue at Mi Pueblo

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Hot sauces at Bodega Charley’s

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The Pollo Grill, marinated chicken with tropical mango salsa at Bodega Charley’s.

MI PUEBLO

Mi Pueblo owner Hugo Nuñez was born and raised in Chihuahua, the large Mexican state that hugs the border with New Mexico and Texas, and the cooking at his small chain of eateries shows it. The menus blend Mexican and American flavors with a focus on beef, a style of cooking Nuñez learned by watching his grandmother in the kitchen.

At 20, Nuñez came to the United States and started working in restaurants, moving up from the dishwash station till he could open his own place, which he did in 1999, with the first Mi Pueblo on Bee Ridge. A Venice location followed in 2001 and a University Parkway spot cropped up four years later. Do they ever considering expanding more? Not likely, Nuñez tells me: “We’re family-owned. We’re hands-on. I think it’s big enough.”

Mi Pueblo
4436 Bee Ridge Rd, Sarasota
941-379-2880.
8405 Tuttle Ave, Sarasota
941-359-9303.
530 U.S. 41 Bypass S, 2-A, Venice
941-486-0005
mipueblomexican.com

TWO SEÑORITAS

Two Señoritas has been such a central part of the Main Street scene for so long that it kind of blows my mind when owner Cheryl Woodruff tells me she and her husband, John, once owned 10 Two Señoritas all over Texas and that many of them might still be open today. She sold the spots when she and John moved to Sarasota in 1994.

“When we got here, downtown was dead,” Woodruff remembers. Now the stretch of Main that’s home to Two Señoritas is one of the busiest in the city, affording passersby the chance to stop in for a margarita and the enchiladas, chimichangas, and fajitas that have won Two Señoritas its large following.

Two Señoritas
1355 Main St, Sarasota
941-366-1618
twosenoritas.com

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Mi Pueblo’s Carne Asada Chihuahua Style

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Handmade signs at Poppo’s

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Artwork at El Torro Bravo

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Steak Taco’s at La Malinche

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Green Chiles ready to be stuffed for the Chile Relleno plate at El Toro Bravo

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Chicken, steak and shrimp fajitas at Two Senoritas.

EL TORO BRAVO

Tex-Mex isn’t typically known as the healthiest of cuisines—what with its focus on cheese, meat, and fried stuff. But while it’s far from a health food restaurant, El Toro Bravo is mixing up that image, including produce plucked from local markets and shunning lard. Owner and chef Ruben Caban opened the Stickney Point spot a decade ago and has earned renown from diners and critics alike for his classic burritos, non-fried chimichangas, and quesadillas that come with either flour or spinach tortillas. Not health food, no, but a cut above for sure.

El Toro Bravo
2720 Stickney Point Rd, Sarasota
941-924-0006
eltorobravosarasota.com

LA MALINCHE

Definitely the priciest spot on this list, La Malinche sits in the southern notch of St. Armands Circle, serving flavorful tacos and enchiladas alongside enormous and intimidating molcajetes. The molcajete is a stew stocked with grilled meat and fish, blistered green onions, and fiery peppers, presented in a wide bowl made out of heated lava rock. I hardly know where to start with it.

Easier to grab are the tacos. That flank steak plate is killer—the meat comes rubbed with spices and marinated and cooked just right—but it’s tough to get over the price. $19.95 for four tacos? At lunch? I guess that’s that St. Armands life.

La Malinche
40 S. Boulevard of the Presidents, Sarasota
941-388-4444

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Fajita’s with steak and shrimp at The Grasshopper

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Poppo’s chicken tacos with honey lime cabbage.

POPPO’S TAQUERIA

Poppo’s is blowing up. What began as a one-off shop on Anna Maria Island’s Pine Avenue has quickly grown into a mini-chain, with a second location open in Bradenton, a third imminent in east Manatee, and a fourth planned in the always-growing University Town Center mini-city.

That success and growth is due to Poppo’s impressive skills with tacos and burritos— each loaded up with whatever ingredients you select from a long counter à la Chipotle. But while Poppo’s might be getting bigger, it’s no cold-blooded titan, and it has so far maintained its dedication to organic meat and produce and collaboration with local producers like Pop Craft. I am hereby lobbying for them to come next door to my house next.

Poppo’s Taqueri
212C Pine Ave, Anna Maria
941-254-7941.
6777 Manatee Ave W, Bradenton
941-251-6982
poppostaqueria.com

THE GRASSHOPPER TEX- MEX

The menu at the South Trail’s Grasshopper goes way back. Way, way back. Owner Dino Soto’s grandmother opened the first Grasshopper Lounge in Adrian, Michigan, in 1971, after arriving in the Great Lake State as a migrant worker from Edinburg, Texas, right near the southernmost border between Texas and Mexico. Soto opened Sarasota’s version two years ago after a long career at Outback, bringing his grandmother down to make sure the cooking was on point. And it is. Instead of relying on cornmeal mixed with water to make tamales, for example, Soto tracks down real masa, the Mexican corn dough that takes four days to make. Sometimes, the old ways are the best ways.

The Grasshopper
7253 S Tamiami Trl, Sarasota
941-923-3688
thegrasshoppertexmex.com

 

DO IT YOURSELF

A handful of Latin American groceries

La Primavera Mexican Food
901 N Washington Blvd, Sarasota
941-366-5321

Guerrero’s Bakery & Restaurant
3557 Webber St, Sarasota
941-923-4459 or 941-923-4406

La Bodega
2828 Clark Rd, #4, Sarasota
941-923-4878

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IN THE KITCHEN: EGGS

inKitchenEggs

WORDS AND RECIPES BY ELIZABETH SNIEGOCKI
RECIPE PHOTOS BY KATHRYN BRASS-PIPER

Spring and eggs go hand and hand, connected by a shared promise of rebirth and renewal. As the season subtly unfolds, I find myself craving farm-fresh, pastured eggs.

These locally produced beauties beckon to me with their varying colors of ivory, brown, and blue—some spotted, some pure and white as snow. Yet their wholesome attractiveness goes beyond a pretty shell: Pastured eggs are nutritious powerhouses! They offer high-quality animal protein, contain significant amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, and are loaded with important nutrients.

Farm-fresh eggs are incredibly versatile in the kitchen. They can take center stage at breakfast—fried, poached, scrambled, and as omelets. And with minimal preparation, they offer endless prospects for lunch, dinner, and even crowd-pleasing finger foods.

Easy to fix, affordable, and incredibly tasty, fresh eggs just might be the perfect food for spring, and beyond!

RECIPES

Croque Madame

Curried Deviled Eggs with Mango Chutney

Honey Egg Custard with Fresh Berries

 

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FROM THE GOOD EARTH: LAND LOVERS

Geraldson Community Farm

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Christa Leonard, Operations Manager, feeding Sprout carrots grown on the farm.

WORDS BY VANESSA CACERES
PHOTOS BY KATHRYN BRASS-PIPER

Nestled in northwest Bradenton near Robinson Preserve and Palma Sola Botanical Garden is a farm that’s leading the way in community outreach.

In many ways, Geraldson Community Farm is like other farms: The people who work there are dedicated and passionate, and the fate of the produce it grows on its 20 acres often depends on the weather.

Yet you’d be hard-pressed to find a farm that has as much of a community connection. When Operations Manager Christa Leonard speaks of the ways that Geraldson, a certified organic farm, connects with local locavores or organizations, she speaks enthusiastically.

First, there’s the farm’s community-supported agriculture (CSA) program, in its seventh season. The CSA season runs from November to May.

Members decide if they want to receive a weekly or biweekly share, and then they enjoy the fruits of the season, pun intended. A CSA membership offers fresh, local carrots, lettuce, leeks, eggplant, turnips, hot peppers, and other items, depending on what’s in season. Shares for the new CSA season will go on sale this month. Those interested should sign up early, as the current season has had a long waiting list, says Leonard.

The farm participates in the Bradenton Farmers’ Market, the Phillippi Creek Farmhouse Market, and hosts its own Palma Sola Farmers’ Market on Sundays from 11am to 3pm. In addition to produce, you can buy paintings, bee pollen and local honey, goat’s milk, and even tacos or pumpkin candy—and visitors can pet the goats that are there on Sunday.

“We have a consistent following from people who want to eat local,” says Leonard.

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Prepping Romaine lettuce for the CSA

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Popsicle sticks are used to identify the different varieties of seedlings.

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Volunteer, Brian Grobleski, harvesting carrots

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One of the many volunteers helping on the farm

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Seedlings growing in trays

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Kevin Miller, Assistant Farm Manager

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Beautiful Kale

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Christa enjoying her freshly picked celery

Yet that’s not all. The farm also hosts a monthly market and occasional special events with the craft brewing company Darwin Brewing in Bradenton. Geraldson supports a number of local food vendors that rely on quality produce. It holds a fall festival for fun and to showcase locally based food vendors. There are school group tours to show kids that what they eat doesn’t just come from the back of the supermarket.

Then there’s the connection with Sarasota’s Indigenous Restaurant. When Leonard and Indigenous chef Steven Phelps met, they formed a fast bond over their passion for eating local, and that led to a farm visit from Phelps.

“It was three hours, and we were just walking through the farm. It was bad weather, but it was just amazing,” he said. That stroll led to a commitment from Leonard to supply produce to the restaurant, which Phelps uses in a variety of dishes, from pickled Hungarian wax peppers to culinary magic with baby carrots, Sun Gold tomatoes, or watermelon radishes, among other items.

“I like working with what a farmer gives me,” says Phelps—and that’s why Leonard will let him know she’s got “presents” for him in the form of delectable produce he’ll turn into creative dishes at Indigenous.

“Christa is the perfect example of someone who loves eating, cooking, and growing food. She’s passionate about it,” Phelps says. “Steve is one of our biggest supporters,” says Leonard, a former behavior therapist who volunteered at Geraldson on her birthday about three years ago. She loved farm life so much that she began to volunteer regularly. She then worked as a farmhand and later became manager.

The farm itself started in 2007, although its Manatee County location has long been farmland. The farm began as part of an arrangement with Florida West Coast Resource Conservation & Development, but it is now self-sustaining.

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Jordyn Roe, Community Outreach Coordinator, getting the farm market ready for the CSA members

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Hot peppers and leeks

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Kathryn Sandland and Travis Dykes selecting their veggies after a morning harvesting in the field.

FUTURE PLANS

Leonard wants to instill in the Sarasota and Bradenton community an appreciation for eating local and an understanding of where food comes from. The farm is currently raising funds for a summer camp for kids age 6 to 12.

“We just want to get ’em out in the dirt and teach them about the land,” Leonard says. The camp would give attendees the chance to try produce they might not have eaten before—and would probably be more open if it’s picked fresh on the farm.

“If we get ’em to try it, then we’ll see the magic happen,” says Leonard. That’s something any health-conscious parent can appreciate. Leonard also is making arrangements with local schools and youth organizations for future partnerships.

All of the efforts from Geraldson Community Farm to change the way we eat and enjoy local food have not gone unnoticed. The farm has earned the top spot in the Farm/ Farmer category in Edible Sarasota’s Local Hero awards, announced in this issue.

Geraldson’s Community Farm
1401 99th St NW, Bradenton
941-792-0985
geraldsoncommunityfarm.org

RECIPE

Creamy Celery & Bean Soup with Coconut and Crispy Bacon

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SEASONAL PLATE: Spring Pea & Mint Pasta with Goat’s Milk Ricotta

RECIPE BY CHARLOTTE ABRAMS
PHOTO BY KATHRYN BRASS- PIPER

WHAT’S IN SEASON
April thru June

Bell Peppers
Blueberries
Broccoli
Cabbage
Cantaloupe
Carrots
Celery
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Grapefruit
Lettuce
Limes
Mushrooms
Nectarines
Onions
Oranges
Peaches
Potatoes
Radishes
Snap Beans
Snap Peas
Squash
Strawberries
Sweet Corn
Tomatoes
Watermelon

springPeaPasta

RECIPE

Spring Pea & Mint Pasta with Goat’s Milk Ricotta

 

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LIQUID ASSETS: MOOOVING ON

The Other White Milk

liquidMooving

WORDS AND RECIPES BY CHARLOTTE ABRAMS
PHOTOS BY KATHRYN BRASS- PIPER

A new genre of milk has hit the food scene, and it has nothing to do with a cow. Concerns of animal welfare, lactose intolerance, and sensitivities to casein (the primary milk protein) have prompted consumers to seek out alternatives to dairy.

Enter mylk. This dairy-free beverage is made from coconuts, tree nuts (like almonds and cashews), and a variety of seeds from hemp to sesame. But it’s the almond variety that has become the favorite choice for everyday use among dedicated mylk drinkers. It’s creamy without being rich and has a mild, nutty flavor, making it extremely versatile. From pouring over cereal to making béchamel for macaroni and cheese, almond mylk can do it all.

Making your own is simple, it only takes about 10 minutes to do, and it’s intensely more delicious than typical grocery store varieties, not to mention free of the additives found in most conventional brands. Do-it-yourselfers beware: Once you give this a whirl, consider yourself a mylk convert.

RECIPES

Basic Almond Mylk

Vanilla Variation

vanillaAlmondMylk

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EDIBLE EATS: PIZZA ON THE GO

Rolling in the Dough

eatsPizzaGo

WORDS BY MEGAN GREENBERG
PHOTOS BY PETER ACKER

“You can taste it in the first bite. You can taste the love,” says Danni Bleil, half of the duo who recently rolled into town to roll out dough for our community.

Perhaps you’ve seen the Polpo Pizza Co. truck lately, as it has made quite a splash since its October debut, collaborating on events with well-known local chefs, feeding faces at the Phillippi Farmers’ Market, and I’m sure your favorite food-loving friend has just hired Polpo to cater her next affair. Word is out and people near and far are bellying up to the pizza bar to marvel at the attractive farm truck all dolled up with a slick paint job and a downright cool true Italian wood oven nestled in its side.

The story is a well-known one. After Bleil and her husband, Tom Baril, spent years escaping the frigid northern weather to enjoy a few weeks respite in Sarasota’s welcoming sunlight, eventually making the permanent move over a year ago. But unlike many who seek our city for retirement, both Bleil and Baril looked to put their impressive culinary and arts backgrounds to work on a new venture. Bleil, a food stylist from the Big Apple, and Baril, a fine-art photographer, knew our city would be the perfect place to build their next creative endeavor.

Polpo focuses on a few main ingredients: quality, authenticity, and uniqueness. “The most important thing for us to is to be hands-on with every step of the process, from selecting ingredients to serving the food. We just don’t believe in taking shortcuts,” Bleil says, her culinary passion just as apparent in what she says as what she serves.

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So how does pizza equal octopus, you ask? Polpo, the Italian word for octopus, is a tip of the hat to the Italian-inspired food they serve, and although they produce a seasonal pizza with the namesake topping, Polpo is more of a nod to Sarasota’s nautical nature than simply a standard menu item.

This is not a pepperoni-by-the-slice pizza parlor. This is a perfectly charred, farm fresh, house made, honey drizzled, mozzarella made daily, Neapolitan style pie creator replete with organic ingredients, artisanal cheeses, craft beer on tap, outstanding appetizers, and desserts made with imagination. We’re talkin’ toppings like garlic cream, pickled watermelon, spicy calabrese, chile-infused honey, porcini ricotta, chardonnay-infused raisins and roasted fennel. Oh, and those imaginative desserts? Don’t miss out on Frangelico Fig, Limone, and New England Apple Pie pizza to name a few.

Folks, forget everything you thought you knew about pizza because once this pie maker gets its arms around you, it won’t ever let go.

Check out Polpo’s website for information regarding upcoming events, seasonal menus, and how to lock them down for your next event.

Polpo Pizza Co.
polpopizzaco.com

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LOCAL HERO WINNERS 2015: FRONT RUNNERS IN FOOD

WORDS BY ABBY WEINGARTEN

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Their quest to create a sustainable food economy is what binds our area’s beloved artisans, farmers, chefs, restaurateurs, purveyors, and humanitarians. Because of these leaders, the Sarasota-Manatee-Charlotte culinary industry continues to thrive each year. To celebrate this  flourishing, we honor the Local Hero Award winners of 2015. Edible Sarasota nominated them, the readers voted online for them, and their names were officially announced in March at the Edible Institute’s Annual Publishers Meeting in New Orleans. Heartfelt congratulations to all!

FARM/FARMER:
Geraldson Community Farm

A 20-acre certified organic farm in Bradenton, founded in 2007, Geraldson is a grower of everything from lettuce, beets, and turnips to herbs, watermelon, and squash. In addition to producing crops, the farm also serves as a resource for local collaboration and education. During the growing season from November to May, a community-supported agriculture program allows the public to purchase shares of the farm’s fresh vegetables. Geraldson produce is also found on the menus at area restaurants.

Geraldson Community Farm
1401 99th St NW, Bradenton
941-792-0985
geraldsoncommunityfarm.org

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CHEF/RESTAURANT:
Steve Phelps (Indigenous)
and Paul Mattison (Mattison’s)

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Photo courtesy of Kim Longstreet

Two of Sarasota’s most lauded, locally minded chefs share this category. Paul Mattison is the restaurateur/chef behind Mattison’s Catering Company, Mattison’s City Grille, Mattison’s Forty-One, Mattison’s Bayside at the Van Wezel and Mattison’s Culinary Adventure Travel (a venture that offers hands-on cooking experiences). Steve Phelps is the chef/owner of Indigenous in Sarasota’s Towles Court Artist Colony. For the second consecutive year, Phelps is a James Beard Foundation semifinalist nominee for Best Chef: South.

Indigenous
239 S Links Ave., Sarasota
941-706-4740
indigenoussarasota.com

Mattison’s City Grille
1 N Lemon Ave., Sarasota
941-330-0440
mattisons.com
Mattison’s Forty-One
7275 S Tamiami Trl., Sarasota
941-921-3400
mattisons-forty-one.com

BEVERAGE ARTISAN:
Darwin Brewing Company

With its craft ales and lagers, Darwin Brewing Company in Bradenton is one of the area’s most innovative beer hubs. Chef Darwin Santa Maria, owner of Darwin’s On 4th in Sarasota, hails from Peru and brings the flavors of South America’s Amazonian and Andean Regions to his libations at the beer garden/production facility.

Darwin Brewing Company
803 17th Ave. W., Bradenton
941-747-1970
darwinbrewingco.com

FOOD ARTISAN:
Tanya’s Toasted Oats Granola

A regular vendor at the Sarasota Farmers’ Market, the Largo-based Tanya’s Toasted Oats Granola is known for its all-natural, old-fashioned products. Owners Tanya Brown and DeLisa Drake create more than 50 flavors of gourmet granola by toasting oats in organic coconut and sunflower oils. There are gluten-free and sugar-free varieties, too.

Tanya’s Toasted Oats Granola
12423 62nd St., Suite 402, Largo
727-643-0349;
tanyastoastedoatsgranola.com

FOOD PURVEYOR/MARKET:
Whole Foods Market

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Always a reliable source of organic, sustainable products, Whole Foods Market is a global health food store with a neighborhood connection. In Sarasota, the market is known for sponsoring area events, donating to nonprofit organizations and supporting food banks. Also, there is always a demonstration or educational opportunity onsite.

Whole Foods Market
1451 First St., Sarasota
941-316-4700
wholefoodsmarket.com/stores/sarasota

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NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION:
All Faiths Food Bank

Combating local hunger is the aim of Sarasota’s All Faiths Food Bank. Initiatives include the Sprout Mobile Farm Market, which delivers thousands of pounds of produce annually to those in need; and the Campaign Against Summer Hunger, which helps keep low-income children fed during the summer months. All Faiths is a member of Feeding America and the heart of the hunger relief system in Sarasota and DeSoto counties.

All Faiths Food Bank
8171 Blaikie Ct, Sarasota
941-379-6333
allfaithsfoodbank.org

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SMALL BITES SPRING 2015

PURELY PALEO

WORDS BY ABBY WEINGARTEN
PHOTOS BY JENNY ACHESON

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smallBitesPaleo
“When I created my bar

recipe, I was looking to
not only make it paleo
but to create a bar that
will give us sustainable
energy”

Becky Schultes knows how to take decadent confections in a healthy direction.

The owner/baker at Heavenly Cupcakes in Sarasota’s Gulf Gate district is famed for her gluten-free, dairy-free, guilt-free creations.

Her latest must-haves: the Purely Paleo Bars.

Comprised of organic, virgin coconut oil; raw, organic honey; nuts and seeds, the bars come in pecan-almond and cashew-cranberry flavors. Both are available daily at the bakery for $3.25 apiece.

“When I created my bar recipe, I was looking to not only make it paleo but to create a bar that will give us sustainable energy. Many bars out there are created with this in mind but actually fail at delivering because they contain mostly sugar,” says Schultes, who has run the 2008-founded bakery since 2012. “Sugar is the root of all evil and will only create a short rush until you crash later, whether the sugar is refined or natural. My bars contain a low sugar content, ingredients you can read, and energy that will last you while filling your belly up.”

The paleo diet basically recommends eliminating dairy and gluten (as well as processed, artificial ingredients) in favor of protein and produce. It is a growing lifestyle, so much so that Schultes’ bars have become bestsellers. Schultes recently aligned with a co-packer in hopes of expanding the brand into various stores.

She is known for this kind of big vision. During the inaugural year of her ownership of Heavenly Cupcakes, she created 64 new recipes in 365 days (including a new cupcake flavor each week and an additional monthly special). Because she is a certified CrossFit trainer and athlete, Schultes combines her dietary knowledge with her passion for dessert artistry. Many of Schultes’ customers seek her out for nutrition advice, as she has maintained a paleo regimen for three years.

“Paleo means lots of things to me, but most of all, it signifies the way we were meant to live, and I can definitely attest to that. Due to my lifestyle change, my stomach hates me if I ever cheat with gluten or dairy now,” Schultes says. “My rule of thumb is, if I really want to splurge, I only splurge with gluten-free foods.”

Some of those paleo splurge items are right on her menu along with the bars, like the dark chocolate cashew or almond butter cups, the dark chocolate blueberry almond bark, the vanilla and chocolate coconut flour cupcakes, and the homemade bread. Sure, there are traditional eats in her bakery, too, but it is in her niche paleo market that she finds the sweetest gratification.

Heavenly Cupcakes
6538 Gateway Ave., Sarasota
941-922-0024
myheavenlycupcakes.com

PERQ COFFEE BAR

WORDS BY MEGAN GREENBERG
PHOTOS BY PETER ACKER

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For many Sarasotans, the fact that Perq Coffee Bar is only celebrating its second birthday comes somewhat as a shock.

Surely, there are those who have yet to frequent this Hillview hotspot, as well as those who view the establishment as more of a treat than a daily retreat. However, for the rest of town, Perq has become a mecca with a cult-like following of caffeine lovers eager to ingest the assortment of beverages and bold brews they pass across the countertop.

That countertop, by the way, was handcrafted from wood by none other than the owners themselves. In fact, the entire place, with its many wooden details, metal finishes, and concrete flooring, was built with the blood, sweat, and tears of the team.

Yeah, a lot of heart went into creating Perq, but Keith and Erin Zolner didn’t mind a bit, because if specialty coffee has taught them anything it’s that a lot, a LOT, of hard work goes into creating the perfect cup.

“Our coffees aren’t cheap,” says Erin of the menu that boasts bold roasts and showcases new-to-most-of-us terms like flat white, Chemex, nel, Gibraltar and Kyoto cold brew.

“But, I think it could be even more expensive when you add up how much effort goes into this agricultural product. We are at the very end of the process. We are the last stop for this little cherry that grows on a tree on the other side of the world.”

She goes on to explain the arduous process it takes to select mindful growers and farmers who are as passionate about the process as she is, farmers who are careful to ensure they are working sustainably and organically and are focused on quality, not commodity.

Perq has indeed cornered coffee, but the space offers much more. Dirty chai, turmeric tea, and matcha adorn the menu, as do craft brews, small bites, juices, and even hot chocolate. They also sell brewing items, like filters and AeroPresses, as well as T-shirts and bags of beans to brew at home. Soon they will be creating more area to offer a wider array of lifestyle items—think periodicals, jams, and other coffee-culture goods, as well as collaborating with local bakers and food makers to bring a taste of Sarasota into the shop.

A central location is a must, but Perq is expanding its reach within the community. Be on the lookout as Perq takes to the streets with an “Out and About Coffee” mobile unit, which the Zolners plan to park at parties, events, and markets.

“Thinking back, it was definitely a risk to fully invest in opening a specialty coffee bar in a town where people may not understand the importance of directly sourced coffee,” says Erin of Perq’s first days. “But, as luck would have it, people embraced it.”

Embraced it they did. By the gallon.

Perq Coffee Bar
1821 Hillview St., Sarasota
941-955-8101
perqcoffeebar.com

 

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT SPRING 2015

foodThotFall13Every other day there is a study on what we should be eating and what we shouldn’t. It often seems overwhelming and sometimes hopeless. One thing is for sure: The over-processing of our food is causing health problems and a disconnection from nature. The simple answer: Don’t eat processed foods—but that’s a tough one today, when convenience and comfort often determine our food choices. We need to stop just gobbling food without question and start assessing the real health and environmental costs that come with our current farming practices and eating habits. In this issue of Edible Sarasota we celebrate our Local Heroes and their quest to create a more sustainable food economy and better eating options for our community.

Abby Weingarten introduces you to the winners of this year’s Local Hero Awards in her “Frontrunners in Food” article. Readers voted online, and the Heroes’ names were officially announced in March at the Edible Communities Annual Publishers Meeting in New Orleans. When it comes to changing the way we think about the food we eat, you all rise to the top. Congratulations and thank you to everyone who voted!

Warning:
Once you’ve
had a truly
fresh egg
there is no
looking
back.

Spring is the season for pastured, farm-fresh eggs. In the spring, eggs are at their nutritional peak. Have you found a local source? Liz Sniegocki writes about the beauty of farmfresh eggs and how to source them in our “In the Kitchen” feature with three mouthwatering recipes. Warning: Once you’ve had a truly fresh egg there is no looking back.

A new genre of milk has hit the food scene and it has nothing to do with a cow. Whether you’re vegan, lactose intolerant, or just craving a tasty, fresh, nondairy milk, there are gallons of healthy reasons to make your own. The fancy glass bottles of “mylk” on the cover of this issue explores nutbased milks and making your own is so simple. (Straws not included.)

And if you’re planning to celebrate Cinco de Mayo, you will love our “Worth the Trip” feature in this issue. Many would say that Mexican food is already a big part of American cuisine these days, but it becomes even more popular and important on Cinco de Mayo. Cooper Levey- Baker visits seven local spots where you can kick off Margarita season with gusto. And if you are planning to create your own fiesta (¡olé!) then check out our list of Latin American grocery markets in town.

Everything we eat has a story, and only when we are able to hear and understand the true stories behind our food can we create better ways of eating and sharing.

Tracy Freeman–Editor

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ADVERTISER INDEX SPRING 2015

Our hearty thanks to all of our advertisers for their continued support in helping to grow and sustain Edible Sarasota. Please make a point of supporting these businesses and organizations.

AUTOMOBILES SALES/SERVICE

Suncoast Motorsports
5005 S Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-923-1700
sunsetautogroup.com

BAKERIES

C’est la Vie
1553 Main St
Sarasota
941-906-9575
cestlaviesarasota.com

Heavenly Cupcakes
6538 Gateway Ave
Sarasota
941-922-0024
myheavenlycupcakes.com

Sift Bakehouse
1383 McAnsh Sq
Sarasota
941-552-8078
siftbakehouse.com

EVENTS

Food and Wine on Pine
foodandwineonpine.com

EVENTS RENTAL

All Event Rental
2048 Bee Ridge Rd
Sarasota
941-894-3406
alleventrental.com

FARMS

White Oak Pastures
Po Box 98
22775 Highway 27
Bluffton GA
229-641-2081
whiteoakpastures.com

FARMERS’ MARKETS

Central Sarasota Farmers’ Market
4748 S Beneva Rd
Sarasota
centralsarasotafarmersmarket.com

Phillippi Farmhouse Market
5500 S Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-316-1309
farmhousemarket.org

Sarasota Farmers’ Market
Main St & Lemon Ave
Sarasota
941-225-9256
sarasotafarmersmarket.org

HAIR SALONS AND SPAS

Cutting Loose Salon
8429 Honore Ave
Sarasota
941-358-6000
cuttingloose.net

Cutting Loose Salon
1950 Main St
Sarasota
941-365-5586
cuttingloose.net

Cutting Loose Salon
5820 Ranch Lake Blvd #112
Lakewood Ranch
941-404-7100
cuttingloose.net

HOTELS

The Ritz-Carlton Sarasota
1111 Ritz Carlton Dr
Sarasota
941-309-2000
ritzcarlton.com/Sarasota

MEDIA

ABC7
1477 10th St
Sarasota
941-552-0777
mysuncoast.com

NON PROFIT

The Sarasota Manatee Originals
freshoriginals.com

RESTAURANTS

Beach Bistro
6600 Gulf Dr
Holmes Beach
941-778-6444
beachbistro.com

Beachhouse Restaurant
200 Gulf Dr
Bradenton Beach
941-779-2222
beachhouse.groupersandwich.com

Bijou Cafe
1287 1st St
Sarasota
941-366-8111
bijoucafe.net

Blue Marlin
121 Bridge St
Anna Maria Island
941-896-9737
bluemarlinami.com

Big Water Fish Market
6641 Midnight Pass Rd
Sarasota
941-554-8101
bigwaterfishmarket.com

Chutney’s Etc.
1944 Hillview St
Sarasota
941-954-4444
chutneysetc.com

Darwin’s on 4th
1525 4th St
Sarasota
941-343-2165
darwinson4th.com

Drunken Poet Café
1572 Main St
Sarasota
941-955-8404
drunkenpoetsarasota.com

Eat Here Anna Maria Island
5315 Gulf Dr
Anna Maria Island
941-778-0411
eathere-ami.com

Eat Here Siesta Key
240 Avenida Madera
Sarasota
941-346-7800
eatheresiestakey.com

Fins at Sharky’s
1600 Harbor Dr S
Venice
941-999-3467
finsatsharkys.com

Indigenous
239 S Links Ave
Sarasota
941-706-4740
indigenoussarasota.com

Jack Dusty
1111 Ritz Carlton Dr
Sarasota
941-309-2000
jackdusty.com

Javier’s Restaurant
6621 Midnight Pass Rd
Sarasota
941-349-1792
javiersrestaurant.com

Louies Modern
1289 N Palm Ave
Sarasota
941-552-9688
louiesmodern.com

Lolita Tartine
1419 5th St
Sarasota
941-952-3172
lolitatartine.com

Madfish Grill
4059 Cattleman Rd
Sarasota
941-377-3474
madfishgrill.com

Mar Vista Dockside Restaurant
760 Broadway St N
Longboat Key
941-383-2391
marvista.groupersandwich.com

Marker 4
509 N Tamiami Trl
Venice
941-786-3291
marker4.com

Mattison’s Bayside
777 N Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-921-3400
mattisons.com

Mattison’s City Grille
1 N Lemon Ave
Sarasota
941-330-0440
mattisons.com

Mattison’s Forty One
7275 S Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-921-3400
mattisons.com

Michael’s on East
1212 East Ave
Sarasota
941-366-0007
michaelsoneast.com

Painters Palate
2801 N Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-355-4620
painters-palate.com

Polo Grill & Bar
10670 Boardwalk Lp
Lakewood Ranch
941-782-0899
pologrillandbar.com

Polpo Pizza Co
6200 Clark Center Ave
Sarasota
facebook.com/polpopizzaco

Sandbar Waterfront Restaurant
100 Spring Ave
Anna Maria Island
941-778-0444
sandbar.groupersandwich.com

Siesta Key Oyster Bar
5238 Ocean Blvd
Sarasota
941-346-5443
skob.com

Station 400
400 N Lamon Ave
Sarasota
941-906-1400
station400.com

Station 400 Lakewood Ranch
8215 Lakewood Ranch Main St
#P103
Lakewood Ranch
941-907-0648
station400.com

Square 1 Burgers & Bar
1737 S Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-870-8111
square1burgers.com

Square 1 Burgers & Bar
5239 University Pkwy
Sarasota
941-359-0001
square1burgers.com

Tin Fish
935 N Beneva Rd #601
Sarasota
941-953-6356
tinfishsarasota.com

SKIN CARE

Renata’s Face & Body
4067 S Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-586-6325

SPECIALTY GROCERS

Detwiler’s Farm Market
6000 Palmer Blvd
Sarasota
941-378-2727
detwilermarket.com

Morton’s Gourmet Market
1924 S Osprey Ave
Sarasota
941-955-9856
mortonsmarket.com

Whole Foods Market
1451 1st St
Sarasota
941-955-8500
wholefoodsmarket.com/stores/sarasota

SPECIALTY FOOD PRODUCTS

Beagle Bay Organics
4501 Manatee Ave W #105
Bradenton
beaglebayorganics.com

Crop Juice
2320 Gulf Gate Dr
Sarasota
941-923-8640
cropjuicesrq.com

Pop Craft Pops
2245 Bee Ridge Rd
Sarasota
941-706-3231
popcraftpops.com

The Spice & Tea Exchange
345 St Armands Cir
Sarasota
941-301-7629
spiceandtea.com

Vino Loco Wine & Gourmet Bottle Shop
420 W Dearborn St
Englewood
941-473-8466
vinolocowine.com

WHOLESALE FOOD SOURCE

Global Organic Specialty Source
6284 McIntosh Rd
Sarasota
941-358-6555
globalorganics.ws

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  • Look to our recipe for honey-herb candied nuts to complete a beautiful cheese board. [Photo by @katbrassphoto]

    Pinned: 3 Mar 2016
  • Mushroom Bourguignon: The French word "bourguignon" or "à la Bourguignonne" means in the style of Burgundy—a major culinary and wine region of eastern France. Recipe Editor @charlotte222's pursuit to re-create a classic Julia Child dish will satisfy all your classic French cuisine cravings. [Photo by @katbrassphoto]

    Pinned: 3 Mar 2016
  • Strawberry-Balsamic Vinaigrette | Edible Sarasota - Recipe by @charlotte222, photo by @katbrassphoto.

    Pinned: 25 Feb 2016
  • Cinnamon Vinaigrette | Edible Sarasota - Recipe by @charlotte222, photo by @katbrassphoto.

    Pinned: 25 Feb 2016
  • Miso Dressing | Edible Sarasota - Recipe by @charlotte222, photo by @katbrassphoto.

    Pinned: 25 Feb 2016
  • More "Southern Comfort from the Slow Cooker": Slow-Cooked Honey BBQ Ribs. @lsniegocki, you're making us drool!

    Pinned: 19 Feb 2016
  • From our table to yours: Tracy's Tourtiere du Quebec, an authentic French-Canadian recipe! [Photo by @katbrassphoto]

    Pinned: 19 Feb 2016
  • From our table to yours: Tina's Pierogis (a.k.a. Varenyky). Photo by @katbrassphoto.

    Pinned: 19 Feb 2016
  • From our table to yours: John and Matt Freeman's Tamales! [Photo by @katbrassphoto]

    Pinned: 19 Feb 2016
  • Cumin-Lime Vinaigrette | Edible Sarasota - Recipe by @charlotte222, photo by @katbrassphoto.

    Pinned: 19 Feb 2016