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Archive | Spring 2013

URBAN GARDEN: FIRST SHOOTS

Micro Greens and Sprouts

urbanFirstShoots

WORDS BY ELIZABETH SNIEGOCKI
RECIPE PHOTOS BY KATHRYN BRASS

Full of concentrated fresh flavor and dense with nutrients, sprouts and microgreens are the perfect addition to soups, salads, sandwiches, and more. Once limited to alfalfa sprouts, the concept of growing sprouts has progressed to a new level in recent years. Now, a wide variety of vegetables, beans, seeds, grains, and herbs are being cultivated for their first shoots—sprouts—and harvested as tiny, young plants—microgreens (think larger than sprouts, but smaller than baby greens).

While sprouts and microgreens are increasingly available at specialty markets, they are also easy and affordable to grow right in your own kitchen! Follow this step-by-step guide to growing your own, and enjoy delicious, nutritious homegrown greens year-round.

How to Grow Sprouts

Sprouting indoors is simple and quick. Because it doesn’t require any light, you can grow sprouts in jars on your kitchen counter.

Supplies:

  • Glass jars (wide-mouth canning jars work well, or recycle peanut butter or pasta sauce jars)
  • Sprout jar lids (these can be purchased, or you can make your own with cheesecloth and a rubber band, or window screening from the hardware store, cut to fit the rings of canning jars)
  • Organic seeds (see below for a list of suggested seeds)

Growing & Harvesting:

  1. Place 2 to 3 tablespoons of seeds in each jar (use a separate jar for each variety of seed). Add about two inches of warm water and let the seeds soak overnight.
  2. After soaking, rinse the seeds with cold water and strain them through the lid. Drain all the water out of the jar (if seeds sit in water, they will rot).
  3. Lay your jar on its side, out of direct sunlight. Rinse and completely drain the seeds twice a day, laying the jar back on its side each time.
  4. Watch for sprouts to emerge (about 4 to 6 days), and eat them before they make their first set of leaves.
  5. Once ready, you can store your sprouts in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Try Sprouting:

Wheat Berries ~ Quinoa ~ Sesame Seeds ~ Beans (Garbanzo, Mung) ~ Peas ~ Lentils

How to Grow Microgreens

Microgreens can be grown just about anywhere, as they don’t require much light—a sunny windowsill or kitchen counter is ideal. Supplies:

  • Shallow seedling trays (available at garden supply stores)
  • Potting mix (look for a seed-starting mix)
  • Seeds (see below for a list of suggested seeds)

Growing & Harvesting:

  1. Fill trays to the top with potting mix, creating a level surface. Moisten lightly with water.
  2. Sprinkle handfuls of seed liberally, in a single layer, across the soil surface. Add a thin, light layer of soil just to cover the seeds. Water lightly with a spray bottle or kitchen sprayer.
  3. Place the tray in indirect, very low sun light. Mist daily to keep the soil moist (don’t allow it to dry out).
  4. When the seeds begin to germinate (about 3 to 5 days) place the tray in bright, indirect sunlight for 12 to 14 hours per day.
  5. Continue to water gently, as needed, keeping the soil moist.
  6. Harvest your microgreens once they have about two sets of leaves, or at 1 to 2 inches tall, by snipping with kitchen scissors.
  7. Wash and use your microgreens immediately, or store them in a resealable container, in the refrigerator, for up to one week.

Try Growing:

Kale ~ Radish ~ Clover ~ Mustard ~ Beets ~ Arugula ~ Broccoli

Tip: If mixing seeds, select ones with similar germination rates so they can be harvested all at once.

RECIPES

Sweet & Spicy Microgreens Slaw

Raw Sprouted Hummus

 

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EDIBLE JACKPOT: HERE’S THE CATCH

Fresh Fish Close to Home

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WORDS BY ABBY WEINGARTEN
PHOTOS BY CHAD SPENCER

Enamored with Siesta Key and the local seafood bounty, restaurateur Scott Dolan saw no reason why an award-winning beach should not have a fresh fish market. In November 2011, he decided to take the plunge and open his own.

“It was odd to me that we were sending all of our locals from Siesta Key over the bridge to buy fresh fish, or to get a lesser product by sending them to a chain grocery store,” Dolan says. “We needed this right here so people didn’t have to drive off the island for their seafood. It seemed like the right concept for the right area.”

It has been. At the boutique-style Big Water Fish Market, patrons can buy fresh grouper, snapper, Key West mahi-mahi, amberjack, Chilean sea bass, swai, grouper, and lobster tails. Dolan buys his inventory direct from commercial fishermen and wholesale distributors, and carries imported catches from Canada, Alaska, and New England. Anglers from St. Petersburg, Tampa, Port Charlotte, Cortez, and the surrounding areas often sell Dolan their merchandise right off the decks of their boats.

“Every day, I get on the phone with my guys and find out who’s going out and when,” Dolan says.

When the catches hit the store, Dolan and his staff members filet the fish onsite. At lunch, for $7 to $12, patrons can order blackened fish sandwiches featuring the catch of the day, as well as the ultra-popular fish burritos, tuna salad wraps, crab cake sandwiches, fish soup, and salad with grilled fish or steamed shrimp. Take-home meals such as grilled or fried filets with dirty rice and steamed vegetables are $15, and there are occasional clambakes and seafood boils. Big Water recently began showcasing its stock at the Siesta Key Farmers’ Market on Sundays, too. “My customers come back because they’re getting the freshest fish they’ve ever had,” Dolan says. “The fact that they don’t have to leave the island is huge for the tourist community that packs our area for months.” It is a concept that makes sense to Dolan, who grew up in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and traveled to Syracuse, New York, every year. In both cities, eating fresh seafood was part and parcel to the lifestyle. Out on the lake in upstate New York, the Dolan clan would regularly chow down on clams and oysters from area waters.

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TAKING THE TOUR
Clockwise: Original art by Ron Genta covers the walls; Jack Hodges making his signature Key Lime Pie; Scott stocking the case with only the freshest local seafood.

When Dolan graduated from Valdosta State University in Georgia, he knew he would eventually enter the restaurant industry, and his first culinary endeavor took him to Atlanta. He introduced an East Coast–type lunch concept “to a southern city that was populated with northern transplants,” he says. It worked, and the eatery, called the New Yorker Deli, thrived for a decade.

Soon, life brought Dolan to Sarasota, where his admiration of the shoreline and coastal fare inspired him to fish for a new venture. Big Water was born, and it has evolved into more than a market for Dolan; it is a lifestyle.

“If I have fishermen coming in from a night catch, I’ll meet them at the market in the middle of the night or first thing in the morning,” Dolan says. “Fresh catches are brought to our doors every morning. We buy off commercial fishermen who are local guys—some of them have charter boats and some are strictly commercial fishermen.”

All of them are friends. Dolan visits the historic Cortez fishing village several times a week to watch the boats dock, step aboard, negotiate deals, and shake hands. While it may always be a challenge for Big Water to compete with big-box grocery stores, Dolan is grateful for his daily patrons who drop in to see “what’s for dinner,” he says. He knows his niche market is right where he belongs.

“The difference between us and the chains is, do you really want to go a chain out of convenience and lower prices knowing you’re buying a previously frozen, farm-raised, lesser product, compared to coming to a specialty market where we’ve talked to the fishermen who’ve caught the fish?” Dolan says. “You may pay a little more at a small mom-and-pop shop like us but you’re getting a better experience all around.” And Big Water continues to reel in its regulars, one Florida-fresh filet at a time.

Big Water Fish Market: 6641 Midnight Pass Rd, Sarasota; 941- 554-8101; bigwaterseafood.com

RECIPES

Parmesan-Crusted Snapper

 

 

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LIQUID ASSETS: INFUSED COCKTAILS

Shaking it Up

 liquidInfused

WORDS BY ABBY WEINGARTEN
PHOTOS BY CHAD SPENCER

In the midst of the faux liquor explosion—when mass-produced bottles of flavored liquors seem to grace every tavern shelf—scores of local renegades are seeking to prove the theory that real is always better than fake.

These harbingers/bartenders are masters of the infusion. They eschew synthetics, invest in the quality of their ingredients, and nurture their seasonal, plant- and fruit-based elixirs for weeks in Mason jars.

Ila Edwards, the bar chef/manager at the Table Creekside, is among Sarasota’s liquid visionaries. “I’ve always loved working with flavor profiles and I find it fascinating how you can create something so delicious out of such simple ingredients,” Edwards says. “I try to find fruits, vegetables and herbs that are in season because that enhances the flavor of the liquors so much.”

Edwards’ recipes include clementine-basil vodka, smoked bacon vodka, pear-vanilla vodka, fig bourbon, applewood cherry vodka, chipotle-mango tequila, and apple-cinnamon vodka.

While Edwards’ blends are unique to her, the trend of infusing is steadily becoming more mainstream. Drink slingers are learning about the delicate infusing process, which involves steeping fruits, herbs, or tea leaves in a liquid as a means of extracting the essential essence into that liquid (which is usually vodka, gin, rum, tequila, sake, or bourbon).

Depending on the nature of the blend, an infusing project could take anywhere from 48 hours to seven or eight days. Edwards filters her bacon vodka four times throughout the course of a week, she says. She also gets whimsical with her martinis. She recently tried a popcorn- infused vodka and put a Fiddle Faddle rim on the glass, and toyed around with butterscotch bourbon, blueberry gin, and banana rum. Patrons regularly return to the Table for Edwards’ Filthy Bacon cocktail with infused bacon vodka and Stilton bleu cheese olives, the Clementine Creamsicle with clementine-basil vodka and French vanilla cream, the Bojito House with homemade cucumber vodka and fresh basil, the Dutch Apple and Berries with apple-cinnamon vodka and fresh berries, and the Black Cherry Jubilee with applewood cherry vodka and chocolate ganache. Her infusions are her “babies,” Edwards says, and as she does with plants, she nurtures them and delights in watching them mature.

Roy Roig at Jack Dusty can relate. He started making mojitos at age 5 for his grandfather in Miami. As a teen, he entered the restaurant industry as a busboy while studying chemistry, and soon began owning and operating South Florida hotspots.

“I have thousands of recipes in my head but I don’t have names for my cocktails. When you go to a restaurant, your grouper or filet mignon doesn’t have a name; it is what the ingredients are. That’s how I approach my drinks,” Roig says.

Whether he is working on green-apple-infused bourbon, sage-infused gin, bacon bourbon, or rosemary-and-thyme-infused vodka, Roig is always pursuing that next great formula (as he used to do in science class). He is also experimenting with homemade, infused bitters in flavors such as jalapeño, basil, and Dijon mustard, which take about a month to settle.

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On the official Jack Dusty bar menu are sippers (cocktails to be sipped and savored), gulpers (long, refreshing beverages), and sandy bottoms (punches for sharing). The Tidewrack Martini, for example, is a sipper with herb-infused vodka, dry sherry, Cointreau, and kummel, served with house-infused herb and vermouth olives.

At Eat Here, mixologists are playing with pineapple-infused vodka for pomegranate-pineapple martinis, wild berry-infused bourbon for Manhattans, sweet chili pepper-infused gin for Canajuned Caesar cocktails, and Hungarian wax pepper-infused tequila for various drinks. They also do a honey-lavender infusion for the Bee’s Knees—a gin-based martini that is the brainchild of Eat Here restaurateur Sean Murphy’s son, Ben Murphy. Sean Murphy once described the Bee’s Knees as a drink that “makes the mental passageway to nirvana invisible,” and it is infused with honey from an anonymous Anna Maria Island producer.

Across the street from Eat Here at Half Shell Oyster House is the Half Shell Bloody Mary with Three Olives vodka. The bartenders infuse the vodka for a week with bell peppers, onion, celery, garlic, and jalapeños, and blend the liquor with Zing Zang Bloody Mary mix. On the sweeter side is the Half Shell’s Wild Berry Infusion martini with raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries, and Chambord black raspberry liqueur.

Like little truth serums, the aforementioned liquors crafted by our own Sarasota mixologists prove one thing: When it comes to the drink, an infusion beats an imposter every time.

RECIPES

Tidewrack Martini

Wild Berry Infusion

Clementine Creamsicle

Pomegranate Pineapple Martini

Eat Here: 1888 Main St, Sarasota; 941-365-8700;
240 Avenida Madera, Siesta Key; 941-346-7800; eatheresarasota.com.

The Table Creekside: 5365 S Tamiami Trail, Sarasota;
941-921-9465; tablesrq.com.

Half Shell Oyster House: 1991 Main St, Sarasota; 941-952-9400; halfshelloysterhouse.com.

Jack Dusty: 1111 Ritz-Carlton Dr, Sarasota; 941-309-2000; jackdusty.com.

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EDIBLE INNOVATORS: BACKYARD BEGINNINGS

Global Organics

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WORDS BY LAEL HAZAN
PHOTOS BY KATHRYN BRASS

The bucolic narrow, unpaved drive in east Sarasota County opens to reveal an idyllic view, reminiscent of the painting American Gothic. Such is the setting of Blumenberry Farms, home to the Blumenthal family, owners of Global Organics, one of the most successful organic produce distributorships in the United States.

Mitch and Colleen Blumenthal both received degrees in hotel and restaurant management in Colorado and thought they were on their way to become part of corporate America. Although Colleen continued on that path, becoming one of the most sought-after healthcare facility appraisers in the country, Mitch—whom his wife describes as a “flower child wannabe”—realized that he wanted something else.

While visiting Mitch’s parents in Sarasota they fell in love with the area and decided to make the move. First Mitch opened a restaurant called Bites and used it to share his passion for healthy eating with the community. But in the process of creating an edible landscape for their new home, he also discovered a love of coddling plants to generate food.

Soon Colleen became concerned that their yard was becoming a jungle and realized that they needed to find a larger location for their growing family and garden. Serendipitously, an investor bought Bites and Colleen found a five-acre organic blueberry farm, which became Mitch’s new project: Blumenberry Farms.

There is a learning curve to becoming an organic farmer. The first years Mitch worked solely for food and knowledge. After the eight-week blueberry harvest on his own farm, Mitch worked for the company that distributed his items.

A true capitalist believing in healthy competition, he saw a need and filled it with a fledging company he called Global Organics. Beginning with one truck going to Miami twice a week, it has grown into a company that employees 100 people and serves the entire southeastern United States, including Publix, Winn Dixie, and Sweet Bay supermarkets.

Realizing the consumer wants to use a product when they find a great recipe, rather than when it may be in season, Global Organics sources from around the world and Mitch was the first person to bring in organic blueberries from New Zealand. He believes that the southern hemisphere can feed the northern one and vice versa.

Global Organics helps organic farmers do what they do best: farm responsibly. The company works to create farm relationships where Global Organics commits to the entire harvest and helps with a crop plan so the farmers no longer have to worry about selling. Global Organics is proud to have certification in Social Justice, which serves as a fair-trade policy for US farms. This means that those people who work at farms that Global Organics sources are paid a living wage. Mitch personally makes sure that the over 100 farms meet his exacting criteria.

In 2004 Mitch saw an opportunity to create a private label to help grocers by creating prepackaged produce. Like any proud father, he first thought to use the names of his sons, Sam and Noah, in the label—however, he realized that putting them together sounded something like Salmonella and would be a poor marketing ploy. They settled on Noah’S, using the big S to represent Sam.

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Mitch is pleased to see that a greater number of people are aware of what they are putting in their bodies. The supermarket organic section is seeing double-digit growth. It is the area of the store to which retailers are adding space. He remembers a time when he offered to source produce for a school, only to be told that serving organic produce would require special permission from the parents. He wondered why the chemically raised produce that was then used didn’t need parental consent. These days, many parents are wary of pesticides and look for organic content for their children.

Although Colleen prefers to find out about Mitch’s day at the dinner table, rather than by working at Global Organics, it is a family business with Mitch’s father acting as treasurer and his sister, Ronni as vice president of administration. The mission of the company is what drives the passion of its employees. They believe that they are the bridge between farm and consumer.

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TAKE A LOOK
From top: Organic mangos are one of the hundreds of organics distributed by Global Organics. Freshly picked heirloom carrots and radishes from Blumenberry Farms; The company encourages employees to take home a bag of perfectly ripe produce.

Global Organics created a green business award-winning, state-of-the-art, 80,000-square-foot environmentally friendly facility, to tightly control the temperature zones and to focus on food safety. They are zealous about all people eating healthy food and play a major role in Sarasota’s All Faiths Food Bank. In addition, the company encourages employees to take home a bag of perfectly ripe produce each day.

The consumer has become better educated; people care about what they put in their mouths. Mitch says his hope is that in 15 years people will ask conventional farmers why they use chemicals rather than the organic tilth of soil that produces the flavors and bounty that Mother Nature intended.

Global Organic Specialty Source: 6284 McIntosh Rd, Sarasota; 941-358-6555; globalorganics.ws

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FRESH ORIGINS: EDIBLE PETALS

Blooming Delicious

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WORDS BY ELIZABETH SNIEGOCKI
PHOTOS BY KATHRYN BRASS

Spring is here and flowers are popping up everywhere—including in the kitchen! Edible flowers can add a fresh and fun dimension to all kinds of culinary creations, making them blossom with color, aroma, and flavor. From spicy to sweet to herbaceous, edible flowers can be sprinkled atop salads, baked into desserts, mixed into butter, preserved in vinegar, and crystallized in sugar. Their uses are as varied and creative as the flowers themselves.

Ready to add a little flower power to your kitchen? Some edible flowers may already be growing in your garden. However, pick with caution, as some flowers are poisonous and should not be eaten. To ensure safety, only eat flowers that have been properly identified as edible (see the list below for starters). Furthermore, choose blooms that have been cultivated without pesticides and chemicals. And to get the best flavor from your flowers, use them fresh-picked and harvested at their peak. Edible flowers can also be found at farmers’ markets, or ordered online.

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TOP PICKS

There are many edible flowers to choose from, and the blossoms of most culinary herbs are safe to eat as well (like arugula, chive, and basil).

Here are five favorite blooms to sample, all of which are suited for growing in our region.

NASTURTIUM

The spicy yellow, orange, or red flowers, as well as the peppery leaves and seed pods, are edible. Try adding them to salads, pasta, meat dishes, and vinaigrettes. Chop and mix the flowers into goat cheese for a colorful spread or use the flowers and leaves to make infused vinegar (see recipe below).

BORAGE

Mild and herbaceous, these purple-blue blossoms have a cucumber-like flavor. Toss them in salads for color, or float them in iced beverages for a beautiful presentation. The star-shape flowers can also be crystallized and used to decorate desserts.

LAVENDER

Floral with citrus notes, this flower can be used in jams and jellies, added to ice cream, crystallized, and made into a tea, among many other uses. Try adding fresh lavender blossoms to grilled pork chops, or use them dried to infuse fresh lemonade.

POT MARIGOLD/CALENDULA

These orange or yellow flowers can be spicy, bitter, tangy, or peppery. Try the petals on soups and salads, or sprinkled on pasta and rice dishes. They also add a pop of color to baked goods such as biscuits, cookies, and bread.

ROSE

All roses are edible, but scented ones are the most flavorful. Use the petals to make vinaigrettes, sauces, and jams. Or add them to meat dishes and baked goods. Try infusing honey with fresh rose petals, or for a spring brunch, serve rose-infused champagne.

RECIPES

Peppery Nasturtium Vinegar

Spring-Bouquet Lemon Ice Pops

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ADVERTISER INDEX SPRING 2013

Our hearty thanks to all of our advertisers for their continued support in helping to grow and sustain Edible Sarasota. Please make a point of supporting these businesses and organizations.

AUTOMOBILES SALES/ SERVICE

Suncoast Motorsports
5005 S Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-923-1700
sunsetautogroup.com

BAKERIES

C’est la Vie
1553 Main St
Sarasota
941-906-9575
cestlaviesarasota.com

Heavenly Cupcakes
6538 Gateway Ave
Sarasota
941-922-0024
myheavenlycupcakes.com
5212 Ocean Blvd
Sarasota
941-346-0024
myheavenlycupcakes.com

COFFEE/ TEA

Local Coffee + Tea
Marie Selby Botanical Gardens
800 South Palm Ave
Sarasota
941-726-1660
localcoffeetea.com

EVENTS

Food and Wine on Pine
foodandwineonpine.com

FARMS/ FARM BUREAUS

Dakin Dairy Farms
30771 Betts Rd
Myakka City
941-322-2802
dakindairyfarms.com

Green Pastures Natural Meats
12255 US 301
Parrish
941-776-2710
brownsgrove.com

Sarasota County Extension Office
6700 Clark Rd
Sarasota
941-861-9900
sarasota.ifas.ufl.edu

White Oak Pastures
Po Box 98
22775 Highway 27
Bluffton GA
229-641-2081
whiteoakpastures.com

FARMERS’ MARKETS

Englewood Farmers’ Market
300 Block W. Dearborn St
Englewood
englewoodfarmersmarket.org

Phillippi Farmhouse Market
5500 South Tamiami Trail
Sarasota
farmhousemarket.org

Sarasota Farmers’ Market
Main St & Lemon Ave
Sarasota
941-225-9256
sarasotafarmersmarket.org

HAIR SALONS AND SPAS

Cutting Loose Salon
8429 Honore Ave
Sarasota
941-358-6000
cuttingloose.net
1950 Main St
Sarasota
941-365-5586
cuttingloose.net

HEALTH

Get Fit Fuel
2063 Siesta Dr
Sarasota
941-554-4567
getfitfuel.com                

Kyäni Nutrition
Bill Spence,
Independent Distributor
941-993-7994
BillSpence.Kyani.net

HOTELS

The Ritz-Carlton Sarasota
1111 Ritz Carlton Dr
Sarasota
941-309-2000
ritzcarlton.com/Sarasota

MUSEUMS

Ringling Museum
5401 Bay Shore Rd
Sarasota
941-359-5700
ringling.org

NON PROFIT

Slow Foods
meetup.com/slowfoodsarasota

RESTAURANTS

Anna Maria Island Oyster Bar
6906 14th St W
Bradenton
941-758-7880
oysterbar.net
6696 Cortez Rd W
Bradenton
941-792-0077
oysterbar.net
1525 51st Ave E
Ellenton
941-721-7773
oysterbar.net

Beach Bistro
6600 Gulf Dr
Holmes Beach
941-778-6444
beachbistro.com

Beachhouse Restaurant
200 Gulf Dr
Bradenton Beach
941-779-2222
beachhouse.groupersandwich.com

Bijou Cafe
1287 1st St
Sarasota
941-366-8111
bijoucafe.net

Blue Marlin
121 Bridge St
Anna Maria Island
941-896-9737
bluemarlinami.com

Coyne’s Pier 28
8201 S Tamiami Trail
Sarasota
941-921-0028
coynespier28.com

Drunken Poet Café
1572 Main St
Sarasota
941-955-8404
drunkenpoetsarasota.com

Duval’s New World Café
1435 Main St
Sarasota
941-312-4001
duvalsnewworldcafe.com

Eat Here
5315 Gulf Dr
Anna Maria Island
941-778-0411
eathere-ami.com
1888 Main St
Sarasota
941-778-0411
eatheresarasota.com
240 Avenida Madera
Sarasota
941-346-7800
eatheresiestakey.com

Euphemia Haye
5540 Gulf of Mexico Dr
Longboat Key
941-383-3633
euphemiahaye.com

Flavio’s Brick Oven
5239 Ocean Blvd
Sarasota
941-349-0995
bellaromaitalianrestaurant.com

Indigenous
239 S Links Ave
Sarasota
941-706-4740
indigenoussarasota.com

Javier’s Restaurant
6621 Midnight Pass Rd
Sarasota
941-349-1792
javiersrestaurant.com

Libby’s Café and Bar
1917 S Osprey Ave
Sarasota
941-487-7300
libbyscafebar.com

Mar Vista Dockside Restaurant
760 Broadway St N
Longboat Key
941-383-2391
marvista.groupersandwich.com

Mattison’s Bayside
777 N Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-921-3400
mattisons.com

Mattison’s City Grille
1 N Lemon Ave
Sarasota
941-330-0440
mattisons.com

Mattison’s Forty One
7275 S Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-921-3400
mattisons.com

Michael’s on East
1212 East Ave
Sarasota
941-366-0007
michaelsoneast.com

mi Pueblo
8405 Tuttle Ave
Sarasota
941-359-9303
mipueblomexican.com
4436 Bee Ridge Rd
Sarasota
941-379-2880
mipueblomexican.com
530 US 41 ByPass S
Venice
941-486-0005
mipueblomexican.com

Pier 22
1200 1st Ave
Bradenton
941-748-8087
pier22dining.com

Polo Grill & Bar
10670 Boardwalk Lp
Lakewood Ranch
941-782-0899
pologrillandbar.com

Sandbar Waterfront Restaurant
100 Spring Ave
Anna Maria Island
941-778-0444
sandbar.groupersandwich.com

Square 1 Burgers & Bar
1737 S Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-870-8111
square1burgers.com
5239 University Pkwy
Sarasota
941-359-0001
square1burgers.com

Sun Garden Café
210 Avenida Madera
Siesta Key, Sarasota
941-346-7170
sol-food.net

Tandoor
8453 Cooper Creek Blvd
Sarasota
941-926-3077
tandoorsarasota.net

Tequila Cantina
1454 Main St
Sarasota
941-554-8586
tequilacantinasarasota.com

The Table Creekside
5365 S Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-921-9465
tablesrq.com

SPECIALTY GROCERS

Big Water Fish Market
6641 Midnight Pass Rd
Siesta Key
941-554-8101
bigwaterseafood.com

Morton’s Gourmet Market
1924 S Osprey Ave
Sarasota
941-955-9856
mortonsmarket.com

Whole Foods Market
1451 1st St
Sarasota
941-955-8500
wholefoodsmarket.com/stores/Sarasota

SPECIALTY Products

Lolablue
1090 Innovation Ave Ste A-112
North Port
941-564-9207
lolablueliving.com

390 Design
941-320-0284
facebook.com/390Design

SPECIALTY FOOD PRODUCTS

Beagle Bay Organics
4501 Manatee Ave W #105
Bradenton
beaglebayorganics.com

Pop Craft Pops
2245 A Bee Ridge Rd
Sarasota
941-302-4221
popcraftpops.com

Sapore Della Vita
saporedellavita.com

SPIRITS/ PUBS

Mr Beerys
2645 Mall Dr
Sarasota
941-343-2854
mrbeeryssrq.com

TRANSPORTATION

Siesta Shuttle
888-536-0030
siestashuttle.com

VISITOR’S BUREAUS

Visit Sarasota County
701 N Tamiami Trl
Sarasota
941-706-1253
visitsarasota.org

WHOLESALE FOOD SOURCE

Global Organic Specialty Source
6284 McIntosh Rd
Sarasota
941-358-6555
globalorganics.ws

Chefs Choice
2035 Whitfield Park Loop
Sarasota
941-751-2433
chefschoiceusa.com

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Sweet & Spicy Microgreens Slaw

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SERVES 6

1½ cups broccoli and/or arugula microgreens
1½ cups clover and/or radish microgreens
½ cup chopped pineapple
½ cup halved green grapes
¼ cup plain Greek yogurt
2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
½ teaspoon tamari (naturally brewed soy sauce)
¼ cup raw sunflower seeds, optional

Combine sprouts, pineapple, and grapes in a large bowl. Combine yogurt, mayonnaise, mustard, lemon juice, and tamari; pour over sprout and fruit mixture. Toss and serve chilled. Top with sunflower seeds, if desired.

Recipe courtesy of Elizabeth Sniegocki

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Raw Sprouted Hummus

rawHummus

MAKES ABOUT 3 CUPS

INGREDIENTS

1 cup sprouted garbanzo beans
¼ cup tahini
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/3 cup fresh herbs (such as cilantro and parsley)
¼ teaspoon kosher salt
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

PREPARATION

Follow instructions above to sprout the beans. Combine sprouted garbanzo beans, tahini, lemon juice, garlic, herbs, and salt in a food processor. With motor running, add olive oil, processing until smooth. Garnish with paprika and a drizzle of olive oil.

Recipe courtesy of Elizabeth Sniegocki

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Parmesan-Crusted Snapper

SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

1 cup finely grated Parmesan cheese
1 tube regular Ritz crackers, crushed (about 1 cup)
¼ cup finely chopped fresh parsley
1 tablespoon Old Bay seasoning
2 large eggs
2 pounds Florida red snapper cut in 4 fillets
Extra virgin olive oil, for frying
Lemon wedges, for serving

PREPERATION

Combine cheese, crushed crackers, parsley, and Old Bay in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, beat eggs with 2 tablespoons water until frothy. Coat fish in egg wash, then coat in cheese mixture. Pour enough oil into a large skillet to reach a depth of one-quarter inch and heat over medium heat. Working in batches, fry fish until golden brown and cooked through, 4–5 minutes per side. Serve immediately with lemon wedges.

Recipe courtesy of Big Water Fish Market

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Tidewrack Martini

MAKES 1 COCKTAIL

INGREDIENTS

1¼ ounces house-infused rosemary-thyme vodka
¾ ounces dry vermouth
2 bar spoons Cointreau orange liqueur
1 bar spoon kummel (coriander seed liqueur)
3 green olives marinated in infused vodka
Oyster shell
Thyme and rosemary sprigs

PREPARATION

Shake vodka, vermouth,

Cointreau, and kummel over ice. Strain into a chilled, wide-mouth champagne flute. Garnish with olives, oyster shell, thyme and rosemary sprigs.

courtesy of Jack Dusty

 

 

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Wild Berry Infusion

MAKES 1 COCKTAIL

INGREDIENTS

1¼ ounces house-infused wild berry vodka
(raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries)
¾ ounce Chambord black raspberry liqueur
1½ ounces sweet-and-sour mix

PREPARATION

Shake all ingredients over ice. Strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with an infused raspberry and strawberry.

courtesy of Half Shell Oyster House

 

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Clementine Creamsicle

MAKES 1 COCKTAIL

INGREDIENTS

2 ounces house-infused clementine-basil vodka
1 ounce sweetened condensed milk
½ ounce simple syrup
2 ounces French vanilla cream
Fresh basil leaf
Orange twist

PREPARATION

Shake vodka, condensed milk, simple syrup, and cream over ice. Strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with basil and orange twist.

courtesy of The Table Creekside

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FARMERS’ MARKETS SPRING 2013

Your Guide to Community Farmers’ Markets

Gardening is the purest of human pleasures.
—Francis Bacon

BRADENTON

Bradenton Farmers’ Market
Old Main St (12th StW)
Saturday 9am–2pm
October–May
bradentonfarmersmarket.com

Bridge Street Market
Historic Bridge St
Bradenton Beach
Sunday 10am–3pm
November–April
bridgestreetmerchants.com

San Marco Plaza Farmers’ Market
8215 Natures Way
Lakewood Ranch
Friday 9am-2pm
October -April
sanmarcoplaza.com

ELLENTON

Ellenton Farmers’ Market
North of the Prime Outlet Mall
Saturday 8am–12pm
June–September
Saturday 8am–1pm
October–May

ENGLEWOOD

Englewood Farmers’ Market
Historic Dearborn St
Thursday 9am–2pm
October- April
Englewoodfarmersmarket.org

NORTH PORT

North Port Farmers’/ Craft Market
114942 Tamiami Tr
Saturday 8am–2pm
Year Round

PUNTA GORDA

Punta Gorda Farmers’ Market
Taylor St
Saturday 8am–1pm
Year Round

SARASOTA

Old Miakka Farmers’ Market
Old Miakka Schoolhouse
15800 Wilson Rd
Saturday 9am-2pm
Year Round
oldmiakkafarmersmarket.com

Phillippi Farmhouse Market
Phillippi Estate Park
Wednesday 9am to 2pm
October- May
farmhousemarket.org

Sarasota Farmers’ Market
Main St & Lemon Ave
Saturday 7am–1pm
Year Round
sarasotafarmersmarket.org

Siesta Key Farmers’ Market
5124 Ocean Blvd
Sunday 8am–1pm
June–September
Sunday 8am–12pm
October–May
siestafarmersmarket.com

VENICE

Venice Farmers’ Market
Nokomis & Tampa Ave.
Saturday 8am–12pm
Year Round
thevenicefarmersmarket.com

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Farmers’ Market Special Corn & Brie Pancakes

farmersCornPancake

These savory corn pancakes have melted brie on top rather than butter.

You can find Rouge et Noir at Sarasota’s own Artisan Cheese Company.

SERVES 4, 4 PANCAKES EACH

INGREDIENTS

3 tablespoons butter, plus more for pan
1½ cups fresh sweet corn kernels (about 3 ears)
1 small clove garlic, minced
¾ cup unbleached all-purpose flour
¼ cup cornmeal
2 tablespoons sugar
1½ teaspoons baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
¾ cup Greek yogurt
1/3 cup milk
1 egg, beaten
4 ounces triple cream brie, such as Rouge et Noir, room temperature
¼ cup chopped chives

PREPARATION

Combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl. Stir in yogurt, milk, egg, and butter until just combined. Fold in corn. Heat a pat of butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium-low heat. Using 2 tablespoons batter for each pancake, spoon into skillet and smooth to make round. Cook until surface of pancakes has formed bubbles, 1–2 minutes. Flip and cook until underside is golden, 1–2 minutes more.

Add more butter to pan as needed. Serve layered with brie and sprinkled with chives.

Recipe courtesy of Charlotte Abrams

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