Top Menu

Here’s How! Cocktails

  • Sergeant Peppers with Peppered Reposado

    Red at Night, Sailors Delight

    Sergeant-Peppers

    A spike of spice and an exuberant shade of orange distinguish bartender Jeff Wolf’s spirited summer highball at the Boat House in Tiverton. The Sergeant Peppers cocktail is a clever play on the flavor profile of the margarita, a cocktail rooted in Mexico in the 1930s, popularized by American tourists. Wolf swaps reposado tequila aged in new oak barrels for the traditional silver tequila base, tangy red bell pepper juice for lime, and sweetens with a drizzle of agave nectar. Reposado tequila imparts notes of grilled pineapple and caramel constituting the buttery vanilla backbone of the cocktail. The clean heat of Bittermens Hellfire Habanero Shrub (a hot sauce specifically designed for cocktails) piques the rich floral acidity of the red bell pepper juice and the bold citrus tones of the garnish, a feathery stalk of cilantro. Sip one at sunset over the Bay to experience a sublime summer combination.

    Willa Van Nostrand is an award-winning mixologist and beverage consultant. She owns Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails. Visit her at LittleBitte.com.

    Sergeant Peppers

    Jeff Wolf, Bartender, Boat House, Tiverton

    Try juicing red, orange, yellow and green bell pepper varieties for psychedelic summertime hues.

    2 ounces reposado tequila (100% blue agave)

    1½ ounces fresh red bell pepper juice*

    ½ ounce agave nectar

    2 drops of Bittermens Hellfire Habanero Shrub

    1 sprig of fresh cilantro

    Combine all ingredients and shake vigorously with ice for 10 seconds. Strain into highball glass filled with ice. Garnish with a bright green sprig of cilantro. Yields 1 cocktail.

    * Core, seed and slice 1 red bell pepper. Juice pepper (or purée in a blender). Fine-strain juice into a clean bottle, discarding pulp. Best if used immediately, otherwise refrigerate several hours.

  • Edible Landscape

    Summer’s Rose

    Lemonade

    The Rugosa rose (Rosa rugosa) also known as salt spray rose or beach rose, grows by the ocean and produces intoxicatingly fragrant pink and white blossoms in early summer. Vodka infused with pink beach roses transforms a humble vodka lemonade into an aromatic jewel. As always, take care when foraging native flora. Make sure not to trespass on private property and to identify the correct species before you harvest or ingest any wild plants. You can substitute with the garden variety but be sure they have not been sprayed with chemical fertilizers or bug repellant.

    Willa Van Nostrand is an award-winning mixologist and beverage consultant. She owns Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails. Visit her at LittleBitte.com.

    Rosa Rugosa Lemonade

    Willa Van Nostrand, Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails, LittleBitte.com

    2 ounces beach rose–infused vodka*

    2 ounces fresh lemonade**

    1 lemon wheel

    Garnish with rose petals and lemon wheels

    Combine infused vodka and fresh lemonade over ice and shake for 10 seconds. Pour over fresh ice. Garnish with rose petals and a lemon wheel. For a full pitcher of Rosa Rugosa lemonade, fill a pitcher with ice and add equal parts infused vodka and lemonade and stir with a long spoon.

    * Add 2 cups fresh rose petals to a 1-quart glass Mason jar and pour enough vodka to fully cover the rose petals. Cover jar and infuse for 1 week or until petals lose color. Strain into a clean glass jar and discard petals.

    ** Combine ½ cup granulated sugar and 2 cups water in a saucepan over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Cool and add 1 cup (8 ounces) fresh-squeezed lemon juice. Store in a clean glass bottle. Refrigerate up to 1 week. (Use maple syrup or native honey instead of sugar if you prefer a local sweetener.) Yields 24 ounces or 3 cups lemonade.

    Lemonade Drinks

     

  • Dandy Shandy

    Beer Cocktails with a Bite

    Dandy Shandy

    A well-crafted beer cocktail is a deceivingly delicate creature. A typical shandy recipe is equal parts beer and fresh lemonade or ginger ale; a light, effervescent solution to a warm weather thirst. Consider the tart overtones of the citrus you choose in order to balance the malt and booze just right. Fresh grapefruit juice intensifies the robust hoppy tones of ale, while fresh lemonade complements lighter styles of lager and beers with a higher rice or barley content.

    Revival Brewing Company’s expert brewmaster, Sean Larkin, points out that when building a shandy with hefeweizen, “it’s a game about balancing the bitterness of the hops. If lemon is too acidic to add to a brew, think about sweetening with pomegranate, mango or passion fruit juice.”

    If you’re looking for some heat, season hefeweizen with jalapeño simple syrup to give the natural spices in the beer, like coriander and orange peel, a leg up. The most divine iterations of a shandy are dry to semi-sweet, where you can taste the characteristics of both the beer and the juice. But relax: If you don’t achieve that perfect mélange the first time, there’s always a second chance.

    Willa Van Nostrand is an award-winning mixologist and beverage consultant. She owns Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails. Visit her at LittleBitte.com.

    Paradise Shandy

    Kelly Adams, Bartender, Boat House, Tiverton

    Though shandies are best suited for the summer, I make them year round to keep the spirit alive. This shandy is named after the Latin term for grapefruit, Citrus paradisi.

    2 ounces Deep Eddy Ruby Red Vodka

    1 ounce jalapeño pepper simple syrup*

    1 ounce fresh lemon juice

    Zeppelin Hefeweizen Ale (by Revival Brewing Company)

    Combine vodka, jalapeño simple syrup and lemon juice and shake vigorously with ice for 10 seconds. Strain into a tall pilsner glass and top with Revival Zeppelin Hefeweizen. Yields 1 beer cocktail.

     

    * Seed, stem and slice 2 jalapeño peppers. Combine 1 cup granulated sugar and 1 cup water in a saucepan and bring to simmer. Add peppers and simmer over low heat for 5 minutes, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Cool and strain into a clean glass bottle. Refrigerate for up to 1 week.

  • Spring Flora

    By Willa Van Nostrand
    Photo by Chip Riegel

    Muddle and Shake

    I think spring and I’m filled with an unebbing anticipation of fresh ingredients, new bulbs and budding flora. I think rain, the final frost and every possible shade of green. It takes incredible patience and a seasoned eye to recognize the inaugural stalks of spring.

    Among them, you’ll find countless mint varieties, thyme, garlic scapes, ramps, chives, rhubarb, pansies and wild violets.

    Muddling is the most immediate and satisfying way to extract the essential oils from these fresh herbs and blossoms.

    Lesley Bolton, beverage director of Avenue N American Kitchen in Rumford, muddles fresh lemon balm (a perennial member of the mint family) with house-made grapefruit bitters, elderflower liqueur and lemon to lay the foundation for The Balmbay, a verdant citrusy Collins. She adds Bombay Sapphire, a London Dry gin infused with almond, licorice and angelica root and shakes the ingredients over ice to activate the essence of the lemon balm and lift the peachy, floral overtones of the elderflower liqueur.

  • Spring Flora • The Balmbay
    Balmbay

    The Balmbay by Lesley Bolton, Beverage Director, Avenue N American Kitchen, Rumford

    By Willa Van Nostrand
    Photo by Chip Riegel

    Muddle and Shake

    I think spring and I’m filled with an unebbing anticipation of fresh ingredients, new bulbs and budding flora. I think rain, the final frost and every possible shade of green. It takes incredible patience and a seasoned eye to recognize the inaugural stalks of spring.

    Among them, you’ll find countless mint varieties, thyme, garlic scapes, ramps, chives, rhubarb, pansies and wild violets.

    Muddling is the most immediate and satisfying way to extract the essential oils from these fresh herbs and blossoms.

    Lesley Bolton, beverage director of Avenue N American Kitchen in Rumford, muddles fresh lemon balm (a perennial member of the mint family) with house-made grapefruit bitters, elderflower liqueur and lemon to lay the foundation for The Balmbay, a verdant citrusy Collins. She adds Bombay Sapphire, a London Dry gin infused with almond, licorice and angelica root and shakes the ingredients over ice to activate the essence of the lemon balm and lift the peachy, floral overtones of the elderflower liqueur.

    The Balmbay

    by Lesley Bolton, Beverage Director, Avenue N American Kitchen, Rumford

    Homemade bitters takes patience more than skill. Plan to get this grapefruit bitters started as soon as you can so you can enjoy The Balmbay when fresh lemon balm is growing in abundance.

    6 sprigs fresh lemon balm

    ¼ ounce grapefruit bitters*

    1 ounce elderflower liqueur

    2 ounces Bombay Sapphire gin

    Soda water

    2 lemon wheels

    Muddle 5 sprigs lemon balm, 1 lemon wheel, grapefruit bitters and elderflower liqueur in a bar glass. Add gin, ice and shake vigorously for 10 seconds. Pour contents into a rocks glass and top with a splash of soda water. Garnish with a lemon wheel and a sprig of lemon balm. Yields 1 cocktail.

    * In a 1-quart glass Mason jar, combine the rinds of 3 large grapefruits, ¼ cup pink peppercorns, 1 cinnamon stick and ¼ teaspoon each cinnamon, cloves, allspice and nutmeg. Pour 20 ounces of Everclear grain alcohol over the ingredients. Cover with lid and store in a cool dry place. After 3 weeks, add 1 cup “cooked sugar” to the batch (¾ cup sugar, ¼ cup water heated in a saucepan until dissolved). Cover the jar and set aside for 1 more week. Give the jar a final shake and fine-strain the mixture into a clean container. Decant the solution into a clean glass bottle with equal parts water, cover and keep refrigerated.

  • The Edible Landscape • DIY Cocktail Garnish Garden

     

    Sapling

    The Sapling by Willa Van Nostrand, Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails

    By Willa Van Nostrand
    Photo by Chip Reigel

    Spring has sprung and the planting season is upon us. I consulted with Lee Ann Freitas of Indie Growers, Rhode Island’s grande dame of “root to shoot” gardening, to compile a list of seven easy-to-maintain edible flower varieties that require little more than the normal weeding and watering.

    Edible blossoms provide visual fireworks, dynamic texture and exquisite flavor to cocktails and main dishes. Lee Ann’s favorite edible blossoms include borage, alyssum, nasturtium and Sweet William.

    My go-to garnishes are rose-scented geranium leaves, calendula blossoms and sorrel leaves because they are equally valuable base ingredients for zesty simple syrups and salads. The process of planning your garnish garden begins by choosing your planting vessel. Adorn existing garden plots or start from scratch in a window box or raised beds. Start each plant from seed or seedling and remember to use soil that has not been treated with pesticides or chemicals. Plant your garnish garden in full sun and look forward to bright blossoms and visiting pollinators.

    If you plant your garnish garden after the last frost of spring, you’ll reap the rewards until the first frost of autumn.

    Borage (Borago officinalis) produces intense blue, purple and pink blossoms that have a light cucumber flavor. This plant is what Lee Ann Freitas lovingly refers to as a “commitment plant” because it self-seeds year after year.

    Alyssum (Lobularia maritima) blossoms bloom white and varying shades of pink and purple. Tiny star-shaped buds are honey-scented with a mild horseradish flavor.

    Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) blossoms are pure visual theatrics available in shades of yellow, white, orange, pink, ruby and deep purple. The blossoms, leaves and seed pods peppery on the palate.

    Rose Scented Geranium (Pelargonium Graveolens) is a tender perennial that can be harvested year-round if you bring it in before the first frost. Garnish cocktails, add to shortbread recipes or teas for a complex citrusy floral aroma. (Beware! Not all geraniums are edible so make sure you plant the edible variety.)

    Sweet William (Dianthus barbatus interspecific) is a kind of Dianthus with clusters of pink, red and purple flowers with a sweet clove-like scent.

    Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is a versatile medicinal herb used to soothe the skin. Garnish with the full blossom or scatter the petals over cocktails or salads. Varieties available in shades of white, yellow, apricot and bright orange.

    Garden Sorrel (Rumex acetosa) is one of the first greens to appear in spring. It’s a hardy perennial that produces tart, lemony greens perfect for vibrant green simple syrups, salads and soups.

    (To order edible flowers or schedule a visit with Indie Growers, contact Lee Ann Freitas at 401.528.9777.)

    The Sapling

    Willa Van Nostrand, Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails

    Brooklyn-based Greenhook Ginsmiths American Dry Gin is vacuum-distilled at low temperatures to capture the aromas of Tuscan juniper, organic elderflower, chamomile and Ceylon cinnamon. This bright, herbaceous gin complements the nuanced citrus notes of the fresh lemon and sorrel in this spring inspired cocktail.

    2 ounces Greenhook Ginsmiths American Dry Gin

    1 ounce sorrel simple syrup*

    ½ ounce fresh lemon juice.

    1 rose-scented geranium leaf for garnish

    Combine vodka, sorrel simple syrup and fresh lemon juice in a bar glass and add ice. Shake hard for 10 seconds and pour over fresh ice into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a rose-scented geranium leaf.

    * Combine 1 cup water, 1 cup sugar and 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the temperature to a low heat and simmer for 3 minutes. Allow the syrup to cool, and add 1 handful fresh sorrel leaves (12 leaves). Blend the mixture in a blender until smooth and strain through cheesecloth or a fine mesh strainer. Bottle and use immediately to maintain the vibrant green color.

    Willa Van Nostrand is an award-winning mixologist and bar consultant. She owns Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails. Visit her at LittleBitte.com

  • Here’s How! • THE GLORIOUS RHUBY

    Botanical Bounty

    The Dimensions of Gin

    BY WILLA VAN NOSTRAND PHOTO BY CHIP RIEGEL

    76309_EdibRhod_I014ChipRiegel.com

    There seems to be a dizzying array of gin lining liquor store shelves these days. Labels broadcast mystically spiced infusions, pungent barrel-aged recipes and traditional juniper-forward bouquets of “Old World” gin.

    Where to begin when ogling the towering aisle of London Dry, Plymouth and the ever-evolving styles of “New Western” botanical gin? “When selecting the base gin for your cocktail, decide your goal for the overall flavor profile,” says Lesley Bolton, beverage director of Avenue N American Kitchen in Rumford. Bolton suggests that particularly botanical gins complement the vibrant aromatics of vermouth and ripe fruit, while London Dry varieties pair impeccably with fresh citrus. Glorious Gin, infused with ginger, lemon and rosemary, sets the tone for her new cocktail, The Glorious Rhuby. The botanicals of Glorious Gin round the acidity of the rhubarb simple syrup and grapefruit juice while embellishing the bittersweet notes of Byrrh, an apéritif made with cinchona, the bark used to make quinine. The resulting tipple is a sweet and savory ode to the opulence of spring.

    Willa Van Nostrand is an award-winning mixologist and bar consultant. She owns Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails. Visit her at LittleBitte.com

    THE GLORIOUS RHUBY

    Lesley Bolton, Beverage Director, Avenue N American Kitchen, Rumford

    Before the arrival of Glorious Gin, I can’t say I was an ardent admirer of the spirit. I find it the choice canvas for rhubarb and other cocktails too.

    2 ounces Glorious Gin

    1 ounce Byrrh Grand Quinquina

    1 ounce rhubarb simple syrup*

    1 ounce fresh grapefruit juice

    1 grapefruit wedge for garnish

    Combine all ingredients in a bar glass, add ice and shake vigorously for 10 seconds. Pour over fresh ice into a 10-ounce rocks glass. Garnish with a wedge of fresh grapefruit. Makes 1 cocktail.

    *Dice 8 stalks fresh rhubarb and combine with 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, reduce to heat and simmer 20 minutes. Let cool completely before pouring it through a fine-mesh strainer into a clean bottle. Refrigerate up to 1 month.

    Visit Here’s How! at EdibleRhody.com for The Balmbay and The Sapling, plus a DIY gardening guide for cocktail garnishes.

  • Peppered Reposado

    Red at Night, Sailors Delight

    77838_EdibRhod_I046

    BY WILLA VAN NOSTRAND
    PHOTO BY CHIP RIEGEL

    A spike of spice and an exuberant shade of orange distinguish bartender Jeff Wolf’s spirited summer highball at the Boat House in Tiverton. The Sergeant Peppers cocktail is a clever play on the flavor profile of the margarita, a cocktail rooted in Mexico in the 1930s, popularized by American tourists. Wolf swaps reposado tequila aged in new oak barrels for the traditional silver tequila base, tangy red bell pepper juice for lime, and sweetens with a drizzle of agave nectar.

    Reposado tequila imparts notes of grilled pineapple and caramel constituting the buttery vanilla backbone of the cocktail. The clean heat of Bittermens Hellfire Habanero Shrub (a hot sauce specifically designed for cocktails) piques the rich floral acidity of the red bell pepper juice and the bold citrus tones of the garnish, a feathery stalk of cilantro. Sip one at sunset over the Bay to experience a sublime summer combination.

    Willa Van Nostrand is an award-winning mixologist and beverage consultant. She owns Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails. Visit her at LittleBitte.com.

    Visit Here’s How! at EdibleRhody.com for the Paradise Shandy and Rosa Rugosa Lemonade, two summer cocktails to get the party started!

    SERGEANT PEPPERS

    Jeff Wolf, Bartender, Boat House, Tiverton

    Try juicing red, orange, yellow and green bell pepper varieties for psychedelic summertime hues.

    2 ounces reposado tequila (100% blue agave)

    1 1/2 ounces fresh red bell pepper juice*

    1/2 ounce agave nectar

    2 drops of Bittermens Hellfire Habanero Shrub

    1 sprig of fresh cilantro

    Combine all ingredients and shake vigorously with ice for 10 seconds. Strain into highball glass filled with ice. Garnish with a bright green sprig of cilantro. Yields 1 cocktail.

    * Core, seed and slice 1 red bell pepper. Juice pepper (or purée in a blender). Fine-strain juice into a clean bottle, discarding pulp. Best if used immediately, otherwise refrigerate several hours.

  • The Sachertorte Coupe

    By Willa Van Nostrand

    Sachertorte Riegel

    Meet me in Vienna

    The Sachertorte Coupe pays homage to the classic Viennese dessert, a rich chocolate cake layered with apricot jam, frosted with dark chocolate icing. In spring of 2014, bar owner Mike Sears of Lili Marlene’s suggested I make a signature dessert cocktail for his new bar at The Dean Hotel, The Magdalenae Room. The first incarnation of The Sachertorte Coupe was made with cognac, apricot cordial and chocolate liqueur; the result was too cloyingly sweet. For the second round I subbed cognac for Bols Genever, “the original gin,” that has a flavor profile closer to a malty vodka than its juniper-laden cousin. I added a splash of lemon juice for brightness, apricot jam for the sake of tradition and a final dusting of dark chocolate to transport you directly to Hotel Sacher.

    Willa Van Nostrand is an award-winning mixologist and bar consultant. She owns Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails. Visit her at LittleBitte.com.

    The Sachertorte Coupe

    One of my favorite modes of transportation is through taste. Here is the quickest route to Vienna via L’il Rhody.

    2 ounces Bols Genever
    ¾ ounce Meletti Cioccolato liqueur
    1 teaspoon apricot jam or preserves
    ¼ ounce fresh lemon juice
    Grated dark chocolate for garnish

    Combine liquid ingredients and stir to dissolve the jam. Add ice and shake hard for 10 seconds. Fine-strain into a chilled cocktail coupe. Position a Microplane grater over the cocktail and grate delicate chocolate shavings over the surface of the drink. Makes 1 drink.

  • Rye Whiskey • A Founding Father

    The Tempest Chip Riegel

    Rye whiskey provides the foundation of classic American cocktails such as the Old-Fashioned and the Manhattan. Even The Sazerac cocktail switched out its original Cognac base for rye whiskey in the 1870s. Rye was the preeminent spirit distilled in Colonial America until its near extinction during the Prohibition era, when rye’s North American brethren, bourbon and Canadian whiskey, took the reins of the whiskey market.

    Rye wouldn’t regain popularity until the early 2000s, beginning what I like to call, “The Whiskey Renaissance.”
    Barman Ben Terry designates Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey as the base for his new seasonal cocktail, The Tempest. Cayenne-maple-cinnamon syrup and a healthy dose of fresh-squeezed lemon juice fill out the punchy, 100-proof Kentucky whiskey. By law, American rye whiskey must have a mash bill of at least 51% rye, lending to its earthy, spicy bite. Be warmed by The Tempest, a winter’s remedy for what ails you

    Willa Van Nostrand is an award-winning mixologist and bar consultant. She owns Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails. Visit her at LittleBitte.com.

    The Tempest
    Ben Terry, bar manager, New Harvest Coffee & Spirits, Providence

    Rye is at the heart of this cocktail; rich and spicy at the outset. Add citrus, local maple syrup and hot pepper to feel the heat.

    2 ounces Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey
    1 ounces cayenne-maple-cinnamon simple syrup*
    1 ounce fresh-squeezed lemon juice
    Lemon wheel for garnish
    Cinnamon stick for garnish

    Combine ingredients over ice and shake for 10 seconds. Strain over fresh ice into a highball glass. Garnish with a cinnamon stick and a lemon wheel. Makes 1 drink.

    * Cut 4 small, dried cayenne peppers in ¼-inch segments. Combine in a saucepan with 6 ounces maple syrup and 6 ounces water. Add 2 cinnamon sticks. Simmer over low heat for 5 minutes, let cool. Fine-strain the syrup into a clean bottle and discard the solids. Refrigerate up to 2 weeks.

  • The Spirit of Yuletide • An Elevated Irish Cream

    BY WILLA VAN NOSTRAND PHOTO BY CHIP RIEGEL

    Enter New Harvest Coffee & Spirits in Providence and your ears may be graced by this slew of terms: “Roasted pepper, dirt, earth, oil, peach, oak, acid…” The team behind the bar speaks coffee and whiskey with equal fluency. Their comprehensive bar program is anchored by a spectrum of international whiskeys; their under-sung heroes include Dad’s Hat Rye, Brenne Single Malt Whisky (made in the Cognac region) and Redemption High-Rye Bourbon.

    Wading through the season’s nogs, grogs and exotic victuals becomes a holiday vocation. Try bar manager Ben Terry’s Whisper in the Dark, a spin on a classic Irish coffee, integrating Irish whiskey, New Harvest’s house-made Irish cream, fresh mint and fresh brewed espresso. The cocktail is layered with herbaceous notes of the Italian digestif Fernet Branca, a hint of cocoa and the velvety texture of cream. Sip the Whisper in the Dark solo or relish the double buzz and enjoy alongside your favorite dessert.

    74654_EdibRhod_I041

    For more seasonal cocktails, including The Tempest and The Sachertorte Coupe, visit Here’s How! at EdibleRhody.com.

    Willa Van Nostrand is an award-winning mixologist and bar consultant. She owns Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails. Visit her at LittleBitte.com.

    WHISPER IN THE DARK

    Ben Terry, bar manager, New Harvest Coffee & Spirits, Providence

    Both caffeinated and creamy, this quintessential coffee cocktail satisfies a sweet tooth.

    8 fresh mint leaves,

    plus more for garnish

    ½ ounce simple syrup*

    2 ounces New Harvest Irish cream**

    ½ ounce Fernet Branca

    1 ½ ounces fresh-brewed espresso

    Muddle mint leaves with simple syrup. Add Irish cream and Fernet Branca. Add ice and shake for 10 seconds. Strain into a rocks glass over ice and layer with the shot of espresso and garnish with mint. Makes 1 drink.

    *Combine 1 cup sugar, 1 cup water; heat until clear, then cool. Refrigerate up to 2 weeks.

    **Combine 14 ounces Irish whiskey, 7 ounces condensed milk, 7 ounces Rhody Fresh half & half, 1 ½ ounces espresso or strong coffee, 1 ounce crème de cocoa and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract.

    Refrigerate in glass jar up to 1 week.

  • A Winning Hand: Three Pears

    Infused, Poached and Sparkling

    BY WILLA VAN NOSTRAND

    PHOTO BY CHIP RIEGEL

    73373_EdibRhod_I037

    ChipRiegel.com

    Some prefer an hourglass but barman Christopher Bender prefers a pear.

    To be specific, a Bartlett pear— that curvaceous golden-hued fruit that ranges in flavor and texture from tart and crisp to ultra sweet and juicy. One way to capture the lightly floral character of a Bartlett pear is to bottle-infuse it in vodka. Enjoy the pear-infused vodka over rocks or use as the base spirit in The Bartlett, a variation of a classic sparkling sour.

    A well-crafted sour is like an epiphany: spirit, fresh citrus juice and sugar. Traditional sour recipes barely resemble that of the barbed, saccharine pre-made sour mixes we find behind most bars today. The Bartlett shines with bright citrus and pear-infused dimension, striking a slightly sweet and astringent balance. The aromatics of the cocktail explode with the sparkling pear cider top while the garnish of pears poached in Port and agave serve as a delightfully decadent accent.

    Willa Van Nostrand is an award-winning mixologist and bar consultant. She owns Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails. Visit her at LittleBitte.com.

    THE BARTLETT

    Christopher Bender, Beverage Director Stoneacre Pantry, Newport

    Pears, pears and more pears—the splendor of fall! Like pears, the pear liqueur and sparkling pear cider appear in autumn. You’ll find the latter two at a well-stocked liquor store.

    1 ½ ounces Bartlett pear–infused potato vodka (like Luksusowa)*

    ¼ ounce fresh-squeezed lemon juice

    1 ounce Warwick Valley American Fruits Bartlett Pear Liqueur

    1 splash Eric Bordelet Authetique sparkling pear cider

    Poached pear garnish**

    Combine vodka, lemon juice and pear liqueur over ice and shake.

    Strain into a coupe glass and top with a splash of sparkling pear cider. To garnish, add 1 round piece poached pear. Makes 1 drink.

    * Core and slice 1 firm pear into ¼-inch segments and fit wedges inside bottle of vodka. Let rest for 10–14 days before serving.

    ** For garnish, peel pear and scoop with melon baller. In a saucepan, combine 1 ½ cups Port wine, ¼ cup agave nectar, 1 vanilla bean, grated zest of ½ lemon. Poach pear pieces over very low heat for 20 minutes and cool.

    For more cocktails, including the Cider Press Sidecar and English Milk Punch, visit Here’s How! at EdibleRhody.com

  • Milk Punch: Gravity Rules

    Riegel_Milk Punch

    (Photo by Chip Riegel)

    Milk punch is one of the oldest documented punch recipes in the world. Early English milk punch recipes date back to the 1520s and were served both hot and cold, and most miraculously, clarified. The trick of this punch is that the hot milk mixes with the cold acidic base and curdles. The batch is then filtered over the course of 6 hours, resulting in 10 servings of clear, liquid magic. Though this particular punch-making process isn’t for the faint of heart or the easily distracted, it certainly amuses the palate and definitely wows the crowd. The full process takes about 8 hours, so allow yourself a day’s notice for preparation. —Willa Van Nostrand

    English Milk Punch

    Christopher Bender, Beverage Director,
    Stoneacre Pantry, Newport

    Our EMP (English Milk Punch) is inspired by American bartending pioneer Jerry Thomas (1830–1885), and various old sailor recipes from the mid-1800s. Begin recipe a day prior to serving.

    1 teaspoon whole coriander

    1 teaspoon whole black pepper

    1 teaspoon whole fennel seed

    1 teaspoon whole caraway seed

    1 clove

    1 cinnamon stick

     

    2 cups water

    1 fresh vanilla bean

    1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger

    Grated zest of 3 lemons

    2 tablespoons dried Darjeeling tea

    2 cups granulated sugar

    8 ounces Jamaican rum (Smith & Cross)

    4 ounces Batavia Arrack*

    3 ounces blended scotch (J&B)

     

    6 ounces fresh pineapple juice

    6 ounces fresh squeezed lemon juice, divided

    21 ounces whole milk

     

    Combine coriander, black pepper, fennel seed, caraway, clove and cinnamon in a spice grinder or clean coffee grinder and pulse gently to break everything up. Add coarsely ground spice mixture to a saucepan and add water, vanilla bean and ginger. Simmer over low heat for 30 minutes. Remove from heat, add lemon zest, Darjeeling tea, sugar and refrigerate overnight.

    Bring mixture to room temperature and strain over a large nonreactive bowl. Pour liquors over the strained mixture and add pineapple juice and 4 ounces lemon juice. Discard solids.

    In a separate pan, heat milk to a low simmer and add 2 ounces lemon juice, remove from heat and let stand for 30 minutes. Pour the curdled milk into the punch base and let sit for 1 hour.

    Add all contents to a fine micron bag (nut milk bag) and hang to strain over a nonreactive bowl for 6 hours. Allow gravity to do all the work. The milk solids will bind together and push a relatively clear mixture through the bag. Pour the clarified punch into 2 sanitized glass bottles or Mason jars. Keeps in the refrigerator for up to 1 week, though best enjoyed fresh. Serve in a chilled rocks glass over ice. Makes enough for 10 servings.

     

    * Javanese spirit distilled from sugarcane and fermented red rice that can be found in any well-stocked spirits shop.

  • An Autumnal Sidecar

    Riegel_Cider Press

    (Photo by Chip Riegel)

     

    One of my first memories involves harvesting bushels of apples in the backyard with my mom. We would make a game of depositing overflowing armloads of apples into baskets as fast as we could, my father at the cider press crushing the fruit with his hand-crank machine. I can still see Dad slopping the amber liquid down a funnel into gallon containers, carelessly swatting lazy yellowjackets as they buzzed drunkenly from apple to overripe apple. The addition of the cider to the Cider Press Sidecar was inspired by those wasps in bacchanalian flight. —Willa Van Nostrand

     

    The Cider Press Sidecar

    By Willa Van Nostrand

     

    The Cider Press Sidecar is a variation of a traditional Prohibition-era sidecar, made with Calvados (apple brandy from the Normandy region in France) instead of Cognac and the addition of fresh apple cider. Use local cider and experiment with domestic apple brandy such as Laird’s Applejack Brandy as your base spirit.

     

    1½ ounces Calvados or apple brandy

    ½ ounce fresh apple cider

    ½ ounce Cointreau or dry Curacao

    ½ ounce fresh squeezed lemon juice

    Granulated sugar for rim

     

    Pour ingredients over ice, shake hard and strain into a chilled cocktail glass rimmed with sugar. (To prepare a sugared rim, coat the outside lip of the glass with a lemon wedge and roll the edge of the glass in sugar.) Add an optional twist of lemon or orange in homage to a classic sidecar.

     

  • Here’s HOW! Bloody Mary, Queen of Brunch

    By Willa Van Nostrand

    Willa Van Nostrand is an award-winning mixologist and bar consultant. She owns Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails and World’s Fair Gallery at Machines With Magnets.

    Photographed by Chip Riegel

     ChipRiegel.com


    Every great recipe begins with an appetite. Once you’ve had that craving, it’s a Bloody Mary or bust.

    She’s the reigning queen of the notorious “morning after” brunch, equal parts salty, sweet and sublimely savory. Her name was coined by her inventor, Ferdinand “Pete” Petiot at Harry’s American Bar in Paris after the First World War, when canned tomato juice first hit the European marketplace.

    The beauty of the Bloody Mary is in its potential for variation. Crush garden-ripe tomatoes instead of canned juice. Infuse vodka with sliced horseradish, jalapeño or basil; steep the infusion for 48 hours and pour through a fine-mesh strainer into a clean glass bottle. For a kick of dry heat, add 4 teaspoons freshly ground black peppercorn per bottle of vodka. To garnish, punctuate your cocktail with fresh veggies or vinegar-brined quick pickles.

    * For more seasonal cocktails, including the Tomato Water Martini visit Here’s How! at EdibleRhody.com.

  • Vinegar-Brined Quick Pickles

    Willa Van Nostrand, founder/owner, Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails

    Quick pickle combinations are infinite. My favorite pickles include radishes, okra, cauliflower, golden carrots, red cabbage and garlic scapes. The trick is to never finish a batch of pickles until you start another. Add them to your Bloody Mary!

    1 quart of sliced seasonal veggies
    3 cups hot water
    3 cups red wine vinegar
    ½ cup sugar
    3 tablespoons salt

    Slice enough veggies to fill a 1-quart glass Mason jar or other nonreactive container. Dissolve sugar and salt in hot water and vinegar in a large nonreactive bowl. Cover the sliced veggies with brine until they are entirely submerged in liquid. Let stand for 30 minutes and refrigerate for up to 1 month. Makes 1 quart.

  • Tomato Water Martini

    Homemade Aqua Vitae
    Willa Van Nostrand, founder/owner, Little Bitte Artisanal Cocktails

    Riegel_tomato_water_martini

    On one scorching July afternoon in 2009 after a long day in the garden, I plucked the first fully ripe tomato off of the vine. This particular tomato was so heavy that I only had one thought: “Drink it.” Once in the kitchen, I smashed it with a wooden spoon and fine-strained it through a cotton coffee filter. I added vodka, a splash of dry vermouth, a pinch of sea salt and a single basil leaf to garnish. After one long sip, I was intoxicated by the sensation of this most unsuspecting, refreshing cocktail. The fresh-strained tomato water adds incredible body to the drink and retains a precious lightness that is silky in texture. Now, all you need is a hot day to make this cocktail sing.

    2 ounces vodka, Lukasova or Boyd and Blair Potato Vodka
    ¼ ounce refrigerated dry vermouth
    4 ounces fresh, fine-strained tomato water*
    Fresh basil sprig for garnish
    Pinch coarse sea salt for garnish

    Add ingredients to a bar glass and stir for 10 seconds. Strain into a chilled martini glass, garnish with a basil leaf or a flowering basil blossom and a pinch of sea salt. Makes 1 drink.

    * Crush or blend 2 large fresh tomatoes and strain through a fine-mesh strainer lined with a coffee filter or 3 layers of cheesecloth into a large bowl. Let the pulp drain and eat or discard the solids. Cover and refrigerate the juice before serving. (One large, ripe tomato yields about 2 ounces of tomato water.)

    PHOTO CREDIT: ChipRiegel.com

  • The New English a.k.a. The Corace Spritz

    Curtis Eaton, bar manager, Loie Fuller, Providence
    Riegel Corace Spritz
    A cocktail is only as good as its base ingredients. During the summer months we use mint, lavender and basil sourced from the restaurant’s farm and greenhouse in Foster, Maple Dell Farm. As they say, “Go fresh or go home.”

    2 sprigs fresh lavender
    2 sprigs basil (1 for garnish)
    ½ ounce native honey syrup*
    2 ounces Beefeater Gin
    ½ ounce fresh lemon juice
    Prosecco to finish

    Muddle herbs and honey syrup in a cocktail shaker and strain into a Collins glass filled with ice. Add lemon juice, gin and top with prosecco. Garnish with a basil sprig or leaf. Try African Blue, Cinnamon Basil and Holy Basil varieties. Makes 1 drink.

    * Dissolve 4 ounces native honey in 4 ounces hot water. Refrigerate for up to 1 month.

    PHOTO CREDIT: ChipRiegel.com

  • Here’s How! Syrups – Not So Simple

    By Chris Amirault
    Photographed by Chip Riegel

    Cocktails

    Inexpensive, fast and in your control—syrups are one of the best ways to add local flavor to your cocktail game. Simple syrup is, well, simple: a one-to-one mixture of water and white cane sugar, heated until the crystals dissolve. For rich syrup, use two parts Demerara (or raw) sugar to one part water.

    Syrups are infinitely variable. Try fresh peeled ginger; fresh herbs like lemon balm, mint, sage, tarragon or thyme; rose petals; or fresh berries. Add to your syrup as it heats, let rest 5 minutes, strain out the solids and refrigerate for 4–6 weeks (2 for berries). One ounce of vodka to every 16 ounces of syrup will keep it bright and fresh. Local maple and honey syrups add a complex sweetness to any cocktail. Just thin with warm water until easily poured.

    The Recipe: Petal Pusher

    Adult Coffee Milk

    Chris Amirault is a member of the award-winning bartending team at Cook & Brown Public House in Providence.

     ChipRiegel.com

  • Petal Pusher

    Jay Carr, co-owner, The Eddy, Providence

    Petal Pusher

    I take advantage of slim spring pickings with syrup made with dried lavender and fresh rosemary. Refreshing with complex floral and citrus notes, you won’t have to push this cocktail on anyone.

    Makes 1 drink.

    1½ ounces premium vodka
    ½ ounce St. Elder or St-Germain elderflower liqueur
    ½ ounce rosemary-lavender rich simple syrup*
    ½ ounce Campari
    ½ ounce fresh lime juice

    Shake all ingredients with plenty of ice. Strain into a coupe glass and garnish with a sprig of lavender.  

    * For syrup, heat 1 cup granulated sugar with ½ cup water on low until sugar dissolves. Add 1 ounce (½ cup) fresh rosemary. After 5 minutes, add ¼ ounce (½ cup) dried lavender. Heat 3 minutes, remove from heat. Let sit for 5 minutes. Strain and stir in ½ ounce vodka. Keep refrigerated in a glass jar 4–6 weeks.

  • Adult Coffee Milk

    Chris Amirault, Cook & Brown Public House, Providence

    Adult Coffee Milk

    Rhode Island’s favorite dairy product makes the move from breakfast diner standard to after-hours quaff with this signature Cook & Brown dessert cocktail.

    2 ounces bourbon, brandy or dark rum
    4 ounces whole Rhody Fresh milk
    1 ounce espresso syrup*

    Shake all ingredients with plenty of ice until cold and frothy. Strain into a highball glass containing fresh ice. Makes 1 drink.

    * For espresso syrup, combine 1¼ cups Demerara sugar, ½ cup molasses, and 8 ounces freshly brewed espresso. (New Harvest Dark Roast of the Decade and Whisper Espresso are excellent choices.) Whisk vigorously over gentle heat until sugar is dissolved. Store refrigerated in a glass jar for 4–6 weeks.

  • Eggs! They’re Not Just for Breakfast

    BY CHRIS AMIRAULT & JEN FERREIRA
    PHOTO BY CHIP RIEGEL

    Heres How Eggs

    Even those old enough to have watched Rocky man up by slurping down half a dozen raw eggs get weak in the knees at the thought of hen fruit in their cocktails. It’s too bad: Classic egg-based drinks like nogs and flips became holiday staples because of their unparalleled creamy, custardy deliciousness. As menus are required to alert you, consuming raw eggs can be risky. But once you’ve tried a classic flip or nog, you’ll know it’s worth it. Use only use the freshest eggs you can find from local farmers you trust. “Dry shake” your ingredients first by shaking them without ice until frothy; adding the wire spring you’ve removed from your cocktail strainer will help increase the agitation and produce a fine foam.

    ORCHARD FLIP
    Kevin T. O’Connor, dining room and bar manager, Persimmon, Bristol
    I use local ingredients in this creamy update of an 18th century flip,
    creating a tart, satisfying homage to a crisp New England evening.

    SOUTH OF MEDFORD NOG
    Chris Amirault, Cook & Brown Public House, Providence
    With its heady rum base, this variation of Baltimore Eggnog adds local twists familiar to our Rhode Island community, including the Italian green walnut liqueur called nocino and Portuguese madeira.

    YOUR HEIRLOOM EGG NOG
    Chris Amirault, Cook & Brown Public House
    With easy-to-find ingredients, a blender, a few hours in the fridge, plus your imagination, you can make homemade eggnog your very own. Vary the spices (consider cinnamon, allspice and clove) and the booze (consider bourbon, madeira and applejack) to create a new family tradition.

    Jen Ferreira is brand ambassador for Lucas Bols and Chris Amirault is a member of the award-winning bartending team at Cook & Brown Public House in Providence.

  • Smoke: It’s In The Air

    BY CHRIS AMIRAULT & JEN FERREIRA
    PHOTO BY CHIP RIEGEL

    Quick: What do Scotland and Mexico have in common? Why, both feature smoke prominently in their world-class spirits. Most Scotch whiskies retain the aromas and flavors produced when peat is burned to dry malted barley, and a similar process is used to roast agave for mezcal, leaving behind its own smoky glow.

    While only a few folks truly enjoy a dram of peaty Islay or fruity Chichicapa straight up, a gentle hand can use a touch of smoke to enhance a cocktail. Wee amounts dropped into the mixing tin or a quick rinse of the glass can provide a haunting reminder of the burning leaves and smoldering campfires at the end of crisp fall days.

     

    Laura Moore's Arándano Fumado

    ARÁNDANO FUMADO
    Laura L. Moore, bartender, Newport Restaurant Group Spanish for “smoked cranberry,” with the Arándano Fumado I marry New England’s tart fruit with Mexican spirits for a distinctly cosmopolitan fall tipple. The mezcal is an enjoyable investment for your home bar but try El Buho for a quality, lower-end alternative.

    2 ounces Espolon Reposado tequila
    1 ounce cranberry simple syrup*
    ¾ ounce freshly squeezed lime juice
    ¼ ounce Ilegal Reposado mezcal

    Shake first 3 ingredients vigorously with plenty of cold ice. Pour the mezcal into a coupe glass, swirl it and discard the excess. Strain cocktail into glass. Garnish with skewered cranberries and dusting of freshly grated cinnamon. Makes 1 drink.

    *For cranberry simple syrup: Combine 1 cup water, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups cranberries and 1 tablespoon cinnamon in a nonreactive saucepan. Simmer until cranberries have burst and sugar has dissolved, about 10 minutes. Strain, cool and keep refrigerated for 4–6 weeks.

  • Bitters: What’s in a Name?

    By Chris Amirault & Jen Ferreira
    Photo by Chip Riegel

    Riegel Mai TaiIt’s tough to sell folks on bitters. Watered, sugared hooch with a dash of Angostura or Peychaud’s is the trunk from which the currently blooming cocktail tree grows but most people at home haven’t dusted off those little bottles in a decade or two.
    And that name—focusing on one or two bittering elements while neglecting dozens of aromatics, spices and other ingredients within does nothing to help.
    Change is afoot. Not only are new takes on classic (orange) and original (chocolate) bitters arriving daily, bartenders are bringing classic bitters back to the main stage. Italian amarossuch as Cynar and Averna, as well as supposedly nonpotable bitters such as Angostura are now front and center, bringing their complexity and depth to a wider variety of libations than ever before.

    Chris Amirault and Jen Ferreira are both members of the award-winning bartending team at Cook & Brown and the board of the Rhode Island Bartenders Guild.

    Bitter Mai Tai
    Jon Dille, bar manager, The Grange, Providence

    I bring the classic tiki to Trinidad for this bitter—dare I say better?—version of the Mai Tai. For the aged rum I like a mix of Privateer Amber and Smith & Cross.

    1½ ounces aged rum
    ½ ounce Angostura bitters
    ½ ounce orange Curaçao
    ¾ ounce maple orgeat syrup*
    ¾ ounce freshly squeezed lime juice
    Fresh mint for garnish
    Lime for garnish

    Shake vigorously with plenty of ice and strain over crushed ice into tall glass. Garnish with mint sprigs and a slice of lime. Makes 1 drink.

    *Orgeat syrup is used to enhance many cocktails including the classic Mai Tai. For maple orgeat, soak 1 cup blanched whole almonds in water overnight. Drain and purée in a food processor with 1 cup pure maple syrup until smooth. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve. Add ½ ounce vodka, a pinch of salt and a few drops of orange blossom water. Keep refrigerated for 4–6 weeks.

  • Bitter Yak

    Chris Amirault, bartender and consultant, Cook & Brown Public House, Providence

    Bitter Yak

    After tasting this bracing brown-n-stirred libation, Farmstead’s Matt Jennings suggested this name to me, using the colloquial “yak” for the cognac base spirit. Here the yak is Marie Duffau Armagnac, a widely available, affordable and excellent substitute for its pricey cousin.

    1 ounce Rittenhouse Bottled in Bond rye
    1 ounce Marie Duffau Armagnac
    ¼ ounce Fernet Branca amaro
    ½ ounce Benedictine liqueur
    Scant ¼ ounce rich Demerara syrup*

    Stir ingredients in a shaker with plenty of ice for 20–30 seconds. Strain over fresh rocks and garnish with an orange twist. Makes 1 drink.

    *For rich Demerara syrup, warm 2 parts Demerara (you can substitute turbinado or other unrefined sugar) with 1 part water by volume and stir until dissolved.

  • Bitters: What’s in a Name?

    By Chris Amirault & Jen Ferreira
    Photo by Chip Riegel

    Riegel Mai TaiIt’s tough to sell folks on bitters. Watered, sugared hooch with a dash of Angostura or Peychaud’s is the trunk from which the currently blooming cocktail tree grows but most people at home haven’t dusted off those little bottles in a decade or two.
    And that name—focusing on one or two bittering elements while neglecting dozens of aromatics, spices and other ingredients within does nothing to help.
    Change is afoot. Not only are new takes on classic (orange) and original (chocolate) bitters arriving daily, bartenders are bringing classic bitters back to the main stage. Italian amarossuch as Cynar and Averna, as well as supposedly nonpotable bitters such as Angostura are now front and center, bringing their complexity and depth to a wider variety of libations than ever before.

    Chris Amirault and Jen Ferreira are both members of the award-winning bartending team at Cook & Brown and the board of the Rhode Island Bartenders Guild.

    Bitter Mai Tai
    Jon Dille, bar manager, The Grange, Providence

    I bring the classic tiki to Trinidad for this bitter—dare I say better?—version of the Mai Tai. For the aged rum I like a mix of Privateer Amber and Smith & Cross.

    1½ ounces aged rum
    ½ ounce Angostura bitters
    ½ ounce orange Curaçao
    ¾ ounce maple orgeat syrup*
    ¾ ounce freshly squeezed lime juice
    Fresh mint for garnish
    Lime for garnish

    Shake vigorously with plenty of ice and strain over crushed ice into tall glass. Garnish with mint sprigs and a slice of lime. Makes 1 drink.

    *Orgeat syrup is used to enhance many cocktails including the classic Mai Tai. For maple orgeat, soak 1 cup blanched whole almonds in water overnight. Drain and purée in a food processor with 1 cup pure maple syrup until smooth. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve. Add ½ ounce vodka, a pinch of salt and a few drops of orange blossom water. Keep refrigerated for 4–6 weeks.

  • Genever Daiquiri

    Jen Ferreira, bar manager, Cook & Brown Public House, Providence.

    Genever

    I take the daiquiri to new lands (actually the Netherlands) by using the malty genever as the backbone. Rich simple syrup is easy to make: Just warm two parts sugar with one part water by volume and stir until dissolved.

    2 ounces Bols genever
    1 ounce freshly squeezed lime juice
    ½ ounce rich simple syrup (see above)

    Shake vigorously with plenty of ice and strain into a chilled coupe glass. Makes 1 drink.

  • The Country Mile

    Willa Van Nostrand, owner, Little Bitte Artisanal Catering and
    bar manager, Machines with Magnets, Pawtucket

    edible Rhody Cocktail

    Photo by Chip Riegel

    1½ ounces Yamazaki 12-year-old Japanese single malt whiskey
    ½ ounce Meletti Liqueur
    ½ ounce Fee Brothers Orgeat
    ½ ounce fresh squeezed lemon juice
    2 dashes of Bitterman’s Orchard Street Celery Shrub
    Lemon peel for garnish
    Thyme spring for garnish

    Shake vigorously with plenty of ice and strain into a chilled coupe glass. Garnish with a long, thin strip of lemon peel and a sprig of fresh thyme. Makes 1 drink.

  • Sours: The Sweet, Tart Truth

    By Chris Amirault & Jen Ferreira

    Chances are that your first mixed drink was a sour made with lousy vodka and sour mix. Vodka may make bartenders sigh but sour mix makes us seethe, as the original—simple syrup made of equal parts sugar and water and fresh citrus juice—is a revelation.

    Sadly, the daiquiri, the classic rum sour with lime, has probably suffered most at the hands of careless bartenders. Lime juice is a potion that magically unfurls in its first hour or two of life, first bright and sharp then tropical and round, after which it quickly degenerates into vile toxin. As Willa Van Nostrand demonstrates, careful attention to basics can produce bliss.

    Willa Van Nostrand at Machines with Magnets, Pawtucket

    Willa Van Nostrand at Machines with Magnets, Pawtucket

    Jen Ferreira and Chris Amirault are members of both the award-winning bartending team at Cook & Brown and the board of the Rhode Island Bartenders Guild.

  • Maple Lane Daiquiri

    By Chris Amirault & Jen Ferreira

    I use a traditional foundation of white rum and a lime twist using a familiar local sweetener, maple syrup, from On the Lane Farm in Foster.

    2 ounces Plantation Three Stars White Rum
    1 ounce freshly squeezed lime juice
    ½ ounce Grade A pure maple syrup
    Lime for garnish

    Shake vigorously with plenty of ice and strain into a chilled coupe glass. Garnish with a lime wheel. Makes 1 drink.

Facebook

Twitter