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Welcome to our “tasting room”. Please click on any link below to sample the flavors of Edible Boston. Issues contain seasonal recipes, grower profiles, restaurant and chef profiles, local food and product news, essays, politics, humor and more!

BRUSSELS SPROUTS AND GOAT CHEESE RISOTTO

Tangy and comforting, this succulent dish, made with Italian shortgrain rice gets its flavor from chicken stock and Celebrity Dairy’s signature goat cheese. Parmesan cheese is traditionally used in risotto recipes but I find that the addition of goat cheese adds creaminess and a delicious pungency. Sage and Brussels sprouts marry seamlessly to produce a refreshing and light meal. In order to activate the natural layer of starch that makes risotto creamy, add the liquid a little at a time and stir constantly. Do not be intimidated by this recipe—it takes the same time to prepare as regular rice and just a tad of muscle. Risotto should be served a little bit moist, or “al onda” (with waves) but not swimming in broth.

Serves 8 to 10 as a side dish; 6 as a main course

1 tablespoon butter
2 cups (10 to 15) Brussels sprouts, cut in quarters
6¼ cups chicken broth (or vegetable broth)
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
½ cup finely chopped shallots
2 cups Arborio rice
1 cup dry white wine
1 teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon of freshly ground black pepper
5 sage leaves, finely chopped
(2 teaspoons fresh or 1 teaspoon dried)
5 ounces Celebrity Dairy’s … Read More

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SPICY MAC ‘N CHEESE CASSEROLE

This spicy and colorful casserole is not your everyday recipe—it’s grown-up macaroni. The ultimate comfort food is transformed into a one-dish meal that is easy to carry-out to your next church supper or holiday pot-luck dinner. Mornay sauce is a white sauce made with cheese and this one—made with creamy Dairyland Farmer’s Cheese by Chapel Hill Creamery—is very simple to make. This luscious casserole feeds a crowd. Pair it with a dry white wine, such as Chardonnay.

Serves 12

1 pound macaroni, cooked according to package
directions
5 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup finely chopped yellow onion
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
¼ cup all purpose flour
2½ cups warm milk
1 teaspoon salt
8 ounces Dairyland Farmer’s Cheese
by Chapel Hill Creamery, remove rind and cut
into ½-inch cubes
2 poblano peppers, roasted, peeled, seeded, deveined
and chopped
¾ cup chopped country ham
4 ounces diced pimientos, drained
For the topping:
1¼ cups dried breadcrumbs
¼ cup butter, melted (½ stick)
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
(or pasilla chile powder)
½ cup finely chopped parsley

Preheat oven to 375°F. Butter a 9x13x2-inch baking dish.

In a medium pot set over medium-high heat, melt the butter. Add the onion and cook, … Read More

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cheese

ARTISANS

A WHEY WITH CHEESE
CHAPEL HILL CREAMERY

BY NANCIE MCDERMOTT PHOTOS BY CAROLE TOPALIAN

Drive out into the countryside beyond the city limits of Chapel Hill, NC, and you’ll find yourself traveling through a rural landscape of rolling hills and endless fields, bordered with wild persimmon trees, blackberry canes and tall pines. Meandering along roads with names like “Homestead” and “Dairyland,” you’ll see hints of the pastoral life of Orange County in days gone by, when tractors outnumbered lawnmowers, and Interstate 40 was just a gleam in a DOT planners’ eye.

But, if you’re lucky enough to be headed out to Chapel Hill Creamery, you’ll see that you’re not on a nostalgia tour, but rather en route to a small-is-beautiful, 21st century agricultural operation, where morning milking is hardly a thing of the past. Those contented cows chowing down on that grassy pastureland are central to a savvy, twenty-first century business plan crafted nearly ten years ago by two women who did not grow up on a farm.

Flo Hawley and Portia Knight founded Chapel Hill Creamery in 2001, with the plan of making great cheese from milk they would purchase from local dairies.When they couldn’t find the kind and … Read More

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campusfarmers

Edible Nation

PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE
Strategies for Building A Sustainable Food System
BY AMBER NIMOCKS

Note: This is the second of two articles focusing on the changing nature of agriculture education in North Carolina.

Ariel Fugate smiles a little when she talks about turning her fellow students onto locally raised produce, meat and cheese. As manager of the farmers market that meets in N.C. State’s brickyard, the 19-year-old sophomore does a lot of educational outreach.

“I think that a lot of people don’t really know what buying local means,” she says

Fugate is majoring in fisheries and wildlife science with a minor in agroecology. She became interested in the minor after learning about the interdependent relationship between wildlife conservation and farmland preservation. Her academic advisor Michelle Schroeder-Moreno also serves as advisor to the student-run market. Its part of
the university’s efforts to promote a broad understanding of the importance of sustainable agriculture.

Educators believe that to transform our food system, far more people to eat more food produced locally and sustainably, we’ll need more than farmers. To truly change the way America eats, we need a new generation that understands how crucial sustainability is. That’s one of the tenets guiding education … Read More

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PURPLE SWEET POTATO PUREE

Purple sweet potatoes are an Asian variety that Stokes Country native, Mark Sizemore, came upon, decided to work with N.C. State to remove any foreign viruses, and then plant. He has shared the potatoes with other Stokes Country farmers in need of a new crop to replace tobacco. The results are uniquely local sweet potatoes with classic sweet potato flavor that make a colorful presentation. You can find them at Whole Foods Market stores and farmers’ markets around the area.

Serves 4.

1½ pounds purple sweet potatoes
½ cup plus 3 tablespoons heavy cream
½ vanilla bean, split lengthwise and seeds
scraped
1 teaspoon grated orange zest
2 tablespoons unsalted butter,
at room temerapture
Kosher salt
Freshly ground white pepper

Preheat the oven to 350º F. Bake the potatoes on a foil lined baking cheese until tender when tested with a fork, about 1 hour. Remove from the oven and let cool 10 minutes or until cool enough to handle. Peel and discard the skin.

Place the potatoes in a food processor fitted with a steel blade.

In a 2 quart pot, add the cream, vanilla bean and orange zest. Heat over medium heat to a simmer and cook for … Read More

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KYLE’S KILLER OYSTERS

In the kitchens at Edible Piedmont, we refer to these oysters as KKO; the recipe was born on a day in the kitchen with leftover oysters. This awesome preparation dovetails in any party setting, from the holidays through Valentine’s Day. We’ll use them to celebrate “Old Christmas.”

Serves 12 as appetizers

6 slices of Rainbow Meadow Farms Applewood-Smoked
bacon, coarsely chopped
2 small onions, finely chopped
2 small red peppers, seeded and finely chopped
2 small stalks of celery, finely diced
2 teaspoons lemon juice, about ½ lemon
2 teaspoons salt
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 generous dashes of Worcestershire
6 to 8 drops of hot sauce
½ teaspoon Chesapeake-style seafood seasoning
2 dozen N.C. oysters, shucked and on the half shell

Preheat oven to 400°F. Meanwhile, heat a large skillet and cook the bacon until crisp.

Add the onion, celery, pepper and all seasonings and sauté until just tender (1 to 2 minutes). Arrange oysters in a casserole or baking sheet lined with aluminum foil.

Spoon mixture on each oyster half and bake for 8 to 10 minutes, until the edges of the oysters just start to curl. Serve immediately.

Kyle’s Note: If shell oysters are not … Read More

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KALE AND WHITE BEAN CLAM STEW

Kale grows well in and actually prefers cold weather; a frost makes it sweeter. It is a nutritious vegetable rich with antioxidants and calcium. Both the leaves and the stem can be eaten, however for this recipe to remove the leaves from the stem, simply fold each leaf in half lengthwise, hold the base, and gently pull the stem. Add kale to pizza topping, salads, sauté with garlic, or add to other soups and stews. This stew is delicious with or without the clams.

Serves 6

1 pound kale leaves, center ribs and stems removed
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup chopped peeled carrots
1 cup chopped celery
1 cup chopped shallots, about 4
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 cup dry white wine
2 15-ounce cans organic white beans, drained
4 cups (or more) vegetable broth
3 fresh thyme springs
1 bay leaf
2 dozen North Carolina farm-raised clams
1 tablespoon Sherry wine vinegar
2 tablespoons assorted chopped fresh herbs
Cook kale in large pot of boiling salted water for 1 minute.
Drain. Transfer to a bowl of ice to cool. Drain, squeeze out water.
Coarsely chop kale.

Heat olive oil in Dutch oven over medium heat. Add carrots, … Read More

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COASTAL FISH STEW

This fish stew is very “Down East,” or South Outer Banks, meaning a bit spicy and tomato based. Float a poached or sunny-side up egg on each serving and it becomes a “Muddle.” I serve this recipe for Super Bowl parties because it holds well in a Crock-Pot and folks just love the change of pace from wings and chili. It’s also a helpful recipe to have for all the big family functions around the holidays. Any flat or small fish fillets will work, and with a little adjustment, NC Bay scallops during their season in December can be used. Add half the fish and at the very last 5 minutes of cooking stir in the scallops.

Serves 8 to 12

8 ounces bacon, diced, use farmer raised bacon if possible
1 cup chopped onions
5 cups water
3 pounds NC wild-caught flounder fillets, or NC farmed catfish
or tilapia
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon celery salt
1 teaspoon hot sauce
Freshly ground black pepper
2 cups organic or fire-roasted ketchup
One 8-ounce can tomato paste
4 to 6 cups cooked rice

Fry the bacon until crisp in a medium skillet. Remove it from the pan and drain on … Read More

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epied_cvr_lrg

Winter 2010

edible Piedmont
Winter 2009/2010


Recipes 

8 Coastal Fish Stew
9 Kale and White Bean Clam Stew
10 Kyle’s Killer Oysters
11 Purple Sweet Potato Puree
20
Spicy Mac ‘N Cheese Casserole
21
Brussels Sprouts and Goat Cheese Risotto
21
Cheese and Fig Thumbprints
22
Potatoes with Smoked Farmer’s Cheese Fonduta
23
Spinach and Feta Rugelach
31
Marilyn’s Biscuits
31
Willard’s Biscuits
31
Granny Wim’s Sausage Gravy
33
Miss Shirley’s All-Time Favorite Sour Cream Cornbread
38
Jay’s Carolina Braised Pork Shanks
39
Jason’s Cracklin’ Pork Shanks

Departments

6 AT OUR TABLE
8 EDIBLE NOTES
10 WHAT’S IN SEASON?

 


Features 

12 EDIBLE NATION
Preparing for the Future
By Amber Nimocks
14 ARTISANS
A Whey With Cheese
By Nancie McDermott
20
RECIPES
Say Cheese!
By Sandra Gutierrez
25
BEHIND THE BOTTLE
In Search of Perfect Holiday Wine
By Amber Nimocks
27
FARM TO PLATE
Changing the Colors of the Rainbow
By Fred Thompson
29
SOUTHERN TRADITIONS
Biscuit School By Belinda Ellis
The Southern Saga of a Side Dish By Katrina Moore
34
WORTH THE TRIP
Visiting Mast Farm Inn By Diane Daniel
36
LOCAL GIFTS
38
BATTLE OF THE PORK SHANKS
41
NC MARKETPLACE / FARMERS’ MARKETS
42
POEM Yule
Read More
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Recipes

BY MICHAEL MCFEE

Concentrated manuscripts
copied out at kitchen tables after good meals
and proofread for quantity and degree,

they were handed down
from grandmother to mother to daughter,
from sister to sister, from friend to hungry friend,

pages from the never finished history of appetite
written in a range of styles
but always in the familiar imperative.

The best ones were stained with their own ingredients.
You could find them in cookbooks or boxes
or (as with my mother) in a drawer

stuffed full as a Thanksgiving turkey
with index cards, sheets from notepads and notebooks,
whatever paper was available

blue with her impatient arthritic cursive—
flavors I still remember
when I find her favorite recipes in an old envelope.

They are receipts for some unaccountable hunger.
They are prescriptions that might yet cure.
They are something given, and received:

take, eat.

 

Originally published in Colander (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 1996) Michael McFee is the author or editor of 13 books, most recently
The Smallest Talk (Bull City Press) and Shinemaster (Carnegie Mellon University Press). He directs the Creative Writing Program at UNCChapel
Hill. His poem, Pork Rinds, received an edible Communities national award.

 … Read More

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