Archive | Fall 2011

Pasta with Anchovies and Dandelion Greens

from Ramona Bajema

Serves 4

  • 1 pound pasta cooked al dente (I prefer spaghetti but any shape will do)
  • 1 can anchovies preserved in olive oil 1 large bunch dandelion greens (or any bitter green that’s in season—arugula is a good substitute)
  • 4–6 cloves garlic, finely chopped ¼ cup olive oil ½ teaspoon crushed chile pepper flakes (optional))
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper (to taste)
  • Parmesan cheese, grated, for garnish

While pasta is cooking, sauté garlic and anchovies in olive oil. Garlic should be a light gold color, barely cooked, and anchovies will break apart and start to dissolve. Turn heat to low. After removing any tough ends, chop greens into large pieces. Add to anchovy/garlic mix with chile flakes, if desired.

Drain cooked pasta, reserving a cup of the water. Toss pasta with anchovy/greens mix and use pasta water to thin if necessary. Add pepper and salt and freshly grated Parmesan cheese to taste.

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Cheese & Tomato Pie

from Randy Graham

*This savory pie is egg-less and gluten-free.

Ingredients:

  • 1 gluten-free piecrust*
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic (minced)
  • 1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes ¾ teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons fresh parsley (chopped)
  • ½ teaspoon dried basil
  • Black pepper to taste
  • 2 medium sweet yellow onions
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 8 ounces mozzarella cheese, grated or cut into thin strips 12 Kalamata olives (pitted & sliced)

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375° F.

Heat olive oil in a large pan and sauté the garlic in it for a few minutes. Add tomatoes and their juice, ½ teaspoon of the salt, parsley, basil and pepper to taste. Simmer sauce, stirring occasionally, until it is reduced by about half. It should be quite thick. Set aside.

Peel, halve and thickly slice onions. Sauté in butter until golden; sprinkle with ¼ teaspoon salt. Set aside. Now you can assemble the pie. Sprinkle Parmesan cheese over the bottom of the pre-baked pastry crust. Arrange the onion slices over Parmesan cheese in an even layer; cover with tomato sauce. Arrange mozzarella cheese evenly on top of the tomato sauce. Sprinkle olive slices on top and bake the pie for 35 … Read More

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RECIPES FROM READERS FALL 2011

Pasta with Anchovies and Dandelion Greens
from Ramona Bajema

Serves 4

1 pound pasta cooked al dente (I prefer spaghetti but any shape will do)

1 can anchovies preserved in olive oil 1 large bunch dandelion greens (or any bitter green that’s in season—arugula is a good substitute)

4–6 cloves garlic, finely chopped ¼ cup olive oil ½ teaspoon crushed chile pepper flakes (optional))

Salt and freshly ground black pepper (to taste)

Parmesan cheese, grated, for garnish

While pasta is cooking, sauté garlic and anchovies in olive oil. Garlic should be a light gold color, barely cooked, and anchovies will break apart and start to dissolve. Turn heat to low. After removing any tough ends, chop greens into large pieces. Add to anchovy/garlic mix with chile flakes, if desired.

Drain cooked pasta, reserving a cup of the water. Toss pasta with anchovy/greens mix and use pasta water to thin if necessary. Add pepper and salt and freshly grated Parmesan cheese to taste.

 

Cheese & Tomato Pie*
from Randy Graham

*This savory pie is egg-less and gluten-free.

Ingredients:

1 gluten-free piecrust*

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 clove garlic (minced)

1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes ¾ teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons fresh parsley … Read More

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Manhattan Perfecto

2 ounces rye whiskey
¼ ounce Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
¾ ounce vermouth (Dolin is my favorite)
¾ ounce sweet vermouth
2 dashes aromatic bitters (Angostura type)

Garni (Luxardo makes very good cherries for this purpose.

Avoid those small bright red objects sold as cherries that taste like rubber balls.) Nothing also works.

Do not shake

Add ingredients to a mixing glass. Add large ice cubes and= stir 40 times. Good use for your swizzle stick collection.

Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Can also be served on the rocks. Strain stirred cocktail into a short tumbler with fresh large ice cubes

Add garni

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The Aviation

2 ounces gin

½ ounce Luxardo maraschino Liqueur

¼ ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice

¼ ounce Crème de Violette (Unobtainable until recently and can be omitted without spoiling the drink)

Lemon twist for garnish

While you are studying this recipe put cocktail glasses in the freezer. Chill.

The ingredients go into a shaker. I suggest using a shaker because at least one ingredient is opaque. Cocktails with clear ingredients must be stirred. Other cocktails can be shaken. Add large ice cubes and shake about 40 times. Vigorously. Strain into the chilled cocktail glasses. Add any garni. Serve.

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drinks

SUSTAINABLE DRINKING

Story and Photos by John Nichols

I’ve been asking various friends lately the same question: “Do you want to keep drinking for the rest of your life?” Most have answered immediately, without thinking too hard, “Well, yes.”

That’s what I thought. I do, too. I think I might have found a way. It’s called Sustainable Drinking. I’ve been practicing it for the past few years and it works for me.

All I know about moderation fits on a cocktail napkin. I’ve transcribed some of the concepts of Sustainable Drinking and a few special tricks and recipes for your consideration. I can’t make specific recommendations as your age, health, body weight, genetics and psychology all factor in. My own personal drinking and eating history is more checkered than a racetrack flag. As I grew older, creep, creep went the waistline. Glug, glug went the pours before, during and after dinner. I eventually had to face my incrementally developing habits and make some healthy changes to my diet and exercise.

As I studied health and nutrition I was led to agriculture. Studying agriculture led to studying our food distribution systems and sustainability. As I studied the interdependent web of all existence I … Read More

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hands

RADICAL AGRICULTURE REVISITED

By Quin Aaron Shakra

Writers often place organic agriculture in history using metaphors of “movements” and “waves” in order to draw meaningful parallels between ecological farming methods in past and present times.

For example, in their book Organic Agriculture: A Global Perspective (2006), authors Paul Kristiansen, Acram Taji and John Reganold trace the first explicit usage of the term “organic” in relationship to farming to Lord Northbourne’s 1940 book Look to the Land. Northbourne wrote that “the farm itself must have biological completeness; it must be a living entity, it must be a unit which has within itself a balanced organic life.” Other well-known precursors to organic farming include Sir Albert Howard’s work in the field of soil science and Rudolph Steiner’s biodynamic philosophy in the 1920s, and Lady Eve Balfour and J. I. Rodale’s respective work on soil science during the 1930s and 1940s.

Yet as waves and movements emphasize continuity from the past to present, they can also elide important distinctions between them. While the precedents for ecological agriculture may extend deep into the past—arguably much deeper than Kristiansen et al. have articulated—“organic” agriculture in the explicit sense is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. It is in essence … Read More

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squash

THE STORY OF A SEED

Story and photos
By Jane Handel

Over the years, my garden has seen the proliferation of numerous species of volunteer plants. Some seeds might come from far away, borne by birds or floating in on a breeze to take root wherever an opportunity presents itself. Others originate from my own plants or trees—a plethora of acorns plunge from my oak tree each spring and quickly sprout.

In some instances, the parent progenitors are down the street—Trees of Heaven and Mexican fan palms, in particular, that sprout everywhere like weeds and require a vigilant removal lest they send down long, stubborn taproots. If left to their own devices, which I see happening all around my neighborhood, these latter fast-growing invasive trees quickly take over.

I feel some guilt when pulling up the baby oaks because so many of these magnificent trees have been lost to development and even the 300-year-old California live oak that I consider to be the soul of my little quarter-acre property has been badly scarred by previous misguided residents and may not be long for this world despite my best efforts to save it.

In my garden’s beginning stages, when there was little more than bare dirt … Read More

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tangent

TANGENT WINES

GOING ALTERNATIVE IN EDNA VALLEY
By Lisa Kring

I don’t drink California Chardonnay, as a rule. To be sure, there exist stellar exceptions. But for the most part, I find that they lack balance and finesse, unlike their French counterparts in Burgundy. So I was excited when I found out about Tangent wines, a line of California wines made from alternative white varietals grown in the Edna Valley.

Two things about Tangent immediately caught my eye: Chardonnay is absent from the lineup, and the winemaker is French. Non Chardonnay, qu’est-ce que c’est? Perhaps this apparent paradox held promise.

Tangent offers fresh, crisp wines that express true varietal character, focusing solely on alternative white wines, such as Albarino, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris, Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier and Reisling. Sourced from Edna Valley vineyards planted by the pioneering Niven family in the ’70s, these grapes can become great wines in the right hands. Raised in Burgundy and grounded in the French winemaking traditions of Champagne and the Loire Valley, Tangent winemaker Christian Roguenant was the man for the job. When the Niven family approached him with the idea for Tangent, he quickly committed. “What made the project completely irresistible is the style of … Read More

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