Archive | Summer 2013

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Bob Cannard, Visionary Farmer

Bob Cannard, Visionary Farmer

Story And Photos By Kirsten Jones Neff

Visionary Farmer and Educator—and His Green String Farm

Over the past few decades, the now internationally renowned Bay Area food movement has benefitted from an exquisite storm of visionary chefs, eager and educated consumers and impassioned writers who extol the virtues of farm-to-table dining. But the single most important element in this robust gustatory renaissance, the one thing that has been and will always be essential for each and every successful culinary venture, is the flavor of the ingredients. The unparalleled quality of the produce delivered by our Northern California farmers has set the bar for the rest of the foodie world.

For over three decades, one North Bay farmer has been at the forefront of the local farming movement that makes our enlightened meals what they are. Thirty-some years ago, Alice Waters and her businessman father were in search of a local farmer whose crops would be worthy of the transcendent dishes of Alice’s upstart restaurant. After interviewing a dozen they chose Bob Cannard, a very young and equally opinionated Sonoma County organic farmer, to be the crowned prince producer for Chez Panisse.

This decision established a … Read More

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In Memoriam

In Memoriam. . .

To Our Napa Valley Pioneers

By David And Monica Stevens

Most great chefs can tell you the “aha” meal that led them to the decision to learn to cook. Musicians can tell you which artists and songs moved them in ways that no others did. Ask any winemaker and they will likely talk your ear off about a specific person, wine or vintage that lifted the veil and sent them on their journey into the wonderful world of wine.

In any business there are pioneers, those who came before and laid the foundation upon which others built. In this issue we pay tribute to some of the pioneers of the winemaking world of the Napa Valley who are no longer with us. A couple of them are household names, and after reading about the many contributions of the others we know you will understand why they deserve to be, as well.

JIM BARRETT, vintner, Chateau Montelena | 1926–2013

Jim Barrett, a Los Angeles lawyer turned vintner, is certainly best known for his 1973 Chateau Montelena Chardonnay, which, along with the 1973 Stag’s Leap Cabernet Sauvignon, won the “1976 Judgment of Paris,” helping to propel the … Read More

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Cherry On Top

Cherry On Top

Find one of the “little people” in this photograph by Matthew Carden (MatthewCarden.com) that has been hidden in another location within this issue and enter the page number of the hidden location on the Edible Marin & Wine Country homepage to win an 8 or 10oz coffee or espresso-based beverage of your choice at Equator Coffees & Teas new Equator Coffees at Proof Lab Surf Shop in Mill Valley’s Tam Junction—right off Hwy. 101. EquatorCoffees.com

Enter to win at EdibleMarinandWineCountry.com

Entries are due by midnight on June 30, 2013. Winners will be notified by email.

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Edible Events

Edible Events Calendar

JUNE

Devil’s Gulch Ranch Summer Camps

June, July & August dates (Nicasio, DGES.org/summer)

Auction Napa Valley

June 1 (Napa Valley, NapaVintners.com)

Cooking from the Farmers’ Market: Hands-On Class with Dinner & Wine

June 1 (The Cooking School at Cavallo Point, Sausalito, 415.339.4799, CavalloPoint.com)

HOME CHEESEMAKING: SONOMA MFK FISHER COMPOTES

June 2 (The Epicurean Connection, Sonoma, 707.935.7960, SheanaDavis.com)

Art, Food & Wine Experience at Kenwood Vineyards

June 2 (Kenwood, 707.282.4228, KenwoodVineyards.com)

Unsung: Summer—Neglected Vegetables at 18 Reasons

June 2 & 9 (San Francisco, 415.252.9816, 18Reasons.org)

Women for WineSense: Meet Our WWS Wine Industry Experts

June 6 (Chimney Rock Winery, Napa, NapaSonoma.com/events)

World Cheese Tour with Janet Fletcher: Notable Newbies

June 11 (Fish Story, Napa, JanetFletcher.com)

The Food of Rancho Pescadero at

Alderbrook Winery with Chef Jeff Mall

June 9 (Healdsburg, 707.433.5987, RelishCulinary.com)

Huichica Music Festival

June 14–15 (Gundlach Bundschu Winery, Sonoma, HuichicaMusicFestival.com)

McEvoy Ranch: Orchard Walk and Mill Tour June 15 (Petaluma, McEvoyRanch.com/tours)

Marin Organic: What Can the Farmer Teach the Doctor?

June 15 (Toby’s Feed Barn, Point Reyes Station, MarinOrganic.org)

BEEKIND BEEKEEPING CLASSES

June 15 (Sebastopol, Beekind.com)

FARM DINNER AT THE FORK AT POINT REYES FARMSTEAD

June 19 (Point Reyes Station, 800.591.6878, PointReyesCheese.com/thefork)

Sonoma Marin Fair

June … Read More

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Braised Artichokes

Braised Artichokes With Preserved Meyer Lemon, Tarragon And Aioli

By Austin Perkins

Photo courtesy of Nick’s Cove

Recipe courtesy of Chef Austin Perkins, executive chef at Nick’s Cove Restaurant and Cottages in Marshall. NicksCove.com

Yield: 5 servings

INGREDIENTS FOR ARTICHOKES

5 cloves garlic

1 gallon water

3 lemons, halved

1 quart white wine

7 peppercorns

2 shallots, quartered

2 tablespoons kosher salt

5 medium artichokes, thorns removed

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 1/2 cup white wine

Rind of 1 preserved lemon (available at most specialty markets), all pith and meat removed, minced

1 tablespoon minced tarragon

Pinch kosher salt

1 tablespoon butter

5 medium artichokes, cleaned of thorns

TO PREPARE ARTICHOKES

Combine the first seven ingredients in a large pot and bring to a rolling boil.

Add the artichokes and cook until the stems are just fork tender (20–30 minutes depending on size). Remove and chill until cooled. Cut each artichoke in half and remove the choke.

Heat the olive oil in a skillet large enough to hold all 10 artichoke halves, or use 2 pans. Add the artichokes, heart side down, and quickly sear, about 30 seconds. Add the garlic and sweat, about 30 … Read More

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Berries For Bikers

Berries For Bikers

By Tracy Wu • Illustrations By Bambi Edlund

As the glorious days of summer arrive here in Marin County, flocks of bikers pedal through the landscape between idyllic towns and redwood-lined glades. They converge upon the rolling hills as the wild berries of the countryside burst into brilliant color—and flavor.

Bikers and berries can be found along many of the same trails in Marin, so here are some rules of the road to help transform your next biking adventure into a feast of delicious wild berries.

China Camp Shoreline Trail

If you get an early start and arrive at China Camp before your biking buddies have fully rubbed the sleep from their eyes, head over to the lower parking lot and pick a few blackberries to munch on while sipping that crucial coffee. Take advantage of the long blackberry patch stretching along the right side of the parking lot to fill up a Tupperware for a mid-morning treat after bagging a few peaks.

While the tardiest members of your biking crew slather on a few more ounces of sunscreen, direct the rest of the team to the massive blackberry patch on the right-hand side of the trail … Read More

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Peter Jacobsen, The Chef’s Farmer

Peter Jacobsen, The Chef’s Farmer

By Jesse Hirsch • Photos By Meg Smith

It’s a timeworn writing cliché to describe a profile subject as complicated and unexpected, defying easy categorization. Sometimes it just means the writer isn’t trying hard enough.

But how else could you describe Peter Jacobsen, a man who’s a part-time practicing dentist, part-time working farmer? A man who has dined at some of the world’s most exclusive, high-concept eateries, yet prefers a simple farm meal at home? A man who lives half-time in the heart of bustling San Francisco, halftime in pastoral Yountville, liking them both in equal measure?

Please, excuse the cliché: Peter Jacobsen defies easy categorization.

THE JOURNEYMAN FARMER

Let’s get this out of the way right off the bat—95% of Jacobsen’s produce goes to the French Laundry, a little restaurant you just might have heard of. That’s the big thing that people tend to focus on, but it’s only part of the story.

Jacobsen and his wife, Gwendolyn (Gwenny to those who know her), bought a house in Yountville 32 years ago, a retreat from hectic city life. It happened to have an acre and a third of land and 120 producing fruit … Read More

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Farmers’ Market & CSA Directory

Farmers’ Market & CSA Directory

FARMERS’ MARKETS

MARIN COUNTY

CORTE MADERA CERTIFIED FARMERS’ MARKET

Year round, Wednesdays, noon–5pm, the plaza at Town Center shopping center, Corte Madera, 415.382.7846

Downtown San Rafael Certified Farmers’ Market Festival

April–September, Thursdays, 6–9pm, Fourth St. between B St. and Cijos St., San Rafael, 415.492.8007

Fairfax Community Farmers’ Market

May–September, Wednesdays, 4–8pm, Bolinas Park, Corner of Bolinas Rd. and Elsie Lane, Fairfax, 415.999.5635

MARIN CIVIC CENTER FARMERS’ MARKET

Year round, Thursdays and Sundays, 8am–1pm, Veterans’ Memorial Auditorium and Civic Center parking lot, San Rafael, 800.897.FARM, AgriculturalInstitute.org

Marinwood Community Farmers’ Market

Year round, Saturdays, 9am–2pm, Marinwood Plaza, at Marinwood Ave. and Miller Creek Rd.,San Rafael, 415.999.5635

MARIN COUNTRY MART FARMERS’ MARKET

Year round, Saturdays, 9am–2pm, Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur, 415.461.5700

MILL VALLEY CERTIFIED FARMERS’ MARKET

Year round, Fridays, 9:30am–2:30pm, CVS Pharmacy parking lot, 759 E. Blithedale Ave., Mill Valley, 415.382.7846

Downtown Novato Community Farmers’ Market

May 7–September 24, Tuesdays, 4–8pm, Grant Ave. between Reichert Ave. and Machin Ave., Novato, 415.999.5635

Point Reyes Farmers’ Market

June 22–November 2, Saturdays, 9am–1pm, Toby’s Feed Barn, Hwy. 1, Point Reyes Station, PointReyesFarmersMarket.org

ROSS VALLEY CERTIFIED FARMERS’ MARKET

May 31–October, Thursdays, 3–7pm, Ross Post Office, Ross, 415.382.7846

Ross … Read More

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Paris to Provence

Paris To Provence (To Northern California)

By Ethel Brennan

When I was growing up in Northern California, my parents couldn’t find the charcuterie we bought and ate almost every day during our summers in France—jambon cru, all kinds of pâtés, fromage de tête, not to mention the special spicy Merguez sausages we liked to grill—back at home. If we wanted those, we had to make our own, and often we did. Now, there are French-inspired artisan charcuterie makers and butchers all over the Bay Area, including my friend Taylor Boetticher’s Fatted Calf in Napa and San Francisco, Café Rouge in Berkeley, The Fifth Quartier Charcuterie at East Bay Farmers’ Markets and Olivier’s Butchery in San Francisco’s Dog Patch. Visit them to assemble a lovely locally-sourced Assiette De Charcuterie.

Any café or bistro, in the tiniest country village to the bustling streets of any city, provided us with glimpses into the lives of locals: the postman stopping by for a quick coffee at the bar while on his morning route, traveling salesmen eating alone, workers having a drink at the bar at the end of their day. At the bistros, changing menus sported regional and local specialties for lunch, … Read More

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The Kids Are (Al)Right

The Kids Are (Al)Right

By Jennifer Carden • Photos By Matthew Carden

When I sat down to write this issue’s Stone’s Soup Corner, I thought I had it all worked out. Melon soup was on the agenda. Perfect for summer—cool, refreshing and easy.

I usually clear my ideas with my 9-year-old daughter before I discuss them with my editor, but this time I never got around to asking her what she thought about this soup idea. Her reaction when she heard: “Mom, no kid is going to eat that!”

And she was right. I had lost sight of whom I was writing for. So, together, we brainstormed for a summer melon-y idea and came up with these creamy pops.

Food is at the center of so much of our lives and too often it becomes simply a chore. We shoo the kids away so we can get the cooking done, clean up and get on to the next task. But food should be fun, not stressful or humorless. That is why I like cooking for kids and silly grown-ups.

Sometimes on a hot day sharing a moment with a sloppy, drippy homemade pop is simply the right thing to … Read More

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