Archive | Harvest 2009 Issue

Harvest 2009 Table of Contents

DEPARTMENTS
4 GRIST FOR THE MILL
Harvest time
6 NOTABLE EDIBLES
Tasty tidbits to savor around Iowa
16 EDIBLE IMBIBABLES
Brewing Close to Home—By Katie Roche
22 BEHIND CLOSED DOORS
Lileah Harris—By Rob Cline
24 THE 99
Louisa County—By Kurt Michael Friese
25 LOCAL HEROES
Time to vote for the best of food around
29 1,000 WORDS
Chiles at the Market
30 THE LAST WORD
Peter Pringle’s The Murder of Nikolai Vavilov—By Kurt
Michael Friese
FEATURES
7 FRISIAN FARMS
Two Iowa brothers make Gouda the old fashioned way
— by Eve Adamson
10 AN IOWA GIRL IN ITALY
A doctoral candidate revels in her work
— By Rachel Horner Brackett
12 FARMING, FLOODS AND FOOTBALL
A visit to Kroul’s Farm
— By Michael Knock
18 OUR DAILY BREAD
Doing the Lord’s work in Laurel
— By Allison Gnade
20 TEACHING THE SCIENCE OF DIVERSITY
The Sand Hill Preservation Center
— By Renee Brinks
26 LEARNING TO GROW
This campus garden is empowering students
— By Brian Morelli
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Our Daily Bread

wheat field

Folding her hands together, Teresa Paul looks up. In response to my question about whether their family farm is more inclined towards promoting their business or their lifestyle, I’ve asked her to separate two sides of the same coin. As Teresa explains, they’re indivisible, and their family business is a benefit to their great lifestyle. For the Paul family, growing grains without chemicals, milling them into top-quality stone-ground flour, and inviting customers out to their idyllic family farm tucked into the rolling hills of central Iowa are embedded in the fabric of their daily life.

Steve Paul’s parents, Wayne and Betty Paul, started the farm in 1959 just outside of Laurel, situated midway between Marshalltown and Kellogg amongst the rolling row crops of Iowa. Wayne’s education in agriculture from Iowa State University taught him to farm corn and soybeans with chemical-input methods, which he pursued for several years. By 1964, however, with the influence and encouragement of a friend, Wayne felt that “God wanted him to create something less manipulated by man” and turned to chemical-free, organic methods of farming. After implementing crop rotations and applying organic fertilizers and other natural cultivation methods, they were convinced that they had chosen … Read More

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