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Let’s play a little game: What images come to mind when you read the word “skillet”?

Cowboys heating up their nightly meal in a pan over an open campfire on the high plains? Perhaps a prairie settler serving sizzling bacon to her family in a log cabin? Or maybe it’s a cartoon homeowner thwarting an unwelcome burglar by smashing him in the head with a frying pan.

Those frying pans you envisioned? Odds are they’re all cast-iron skillets.

At one point in our culinary history, there was no need to qualify the word “skillet”; cast iron was ubiquitous, as evidenced by our little game. But with the advent of the space-race era of the 1960s, cast iron fell out of fashion, replaced by new nonstick aluminum pans which were lighter, sleeker and easier to clean. This new cookware, along with other technological advances that followed, has certainly made our modern kitchens more efficient than those of our grandparents. Granny would undoubtedly be impressed with our sous vide chicken breasts and on-demand one-cup coffee machines.

However, as with bell-bottom jeans and shag carpeting, what’s old has become new again: Cast-iron cookware is experiencing a resurgence in popularity. Along with a renewed appreciation and passion for our grandparents’ less processed way of living (think canning and preserving, victory gardens and “Paleo” diets), many of us are also embracing the tools with which our grandparents cooked, including that workhorse of the kitchen, the cast-iron skillet.

As their name imports, cast-iron skillets are composed of iron. More specifically, they’re made from a mixture of iron and steel, heated to a high enough temperature to liquefy and then poured into a two-sided sand mold in a process called casting. Once cooled, the mold is broken open and the skillet is removed in one solid piece.

While this one-piece construction imparts strength and durability, cast iron has many other advantages as well. It is capable of withstanding extremely high temperatures while absorbing, distributing and maintaining heat evenly, making it ideal not only for frying but also for high-temperature searing and even baking or roasting. Plus, it’s equally at home over an open campfire, on the stovetop, in the oven or on an outdoor barbecue grill.

The secret to getting the best performance from a cast-iron skillet lies in the seasoning process (see sidebar for one recommended technique). Seasoning means baking on light coats of oil that not only protect the skillet’s surface but also fill in miniscule pits and cracks; it’s akin to keeping a good coat of wax on wood furniture or moisturizing your skin in winter. Each time the pan is used, a little more oil is baked on, further smoothing the surface and helping to give it its famous low-stick quality.

Another advantage is that the skillet is easy to clean. Once properly seasoned, it requires only a light cleaning with mild soap and water to remove leftover cooking oils. In fact, some advocate not using soap at all but instead simply scouring off excess oil with hot water and a scrub brush or a handful of salt. Perhaps this no-cleaning approach is why the skillet has been a staple at hunting and fishing camps. Regardless, there’s certainly no soaking required or even advised; soaking or running a cast-iron skillet through a dishwasher will remove too much of the essential seasoning layer.

So keep the cleaning procedure simple: After using the skillet, let it cool, swish it with mild soap and water, then dry it thoroughly with a towel. Place the pan back on the stove over low heat for a minute to help any remaining water evaporate, then re-season by lightly wiping the surface with a little food-grade oil soaked into a paper towel or soft cloth. Let the pan continue to sit on the heat for another minute or two, remove it from the heat, carefully wipe out any excess oil, cool it and store it in a dry place.

In the interest of balanced reporting, I now have to tell you that the cast-iron skillet is only nearly perfect. Its sturdy iron construction comes with a price: Cast iron is heavy. For those with carpal tunnel syndrome or who like to cook in oversized pans, a larger-sized cast-iron skillet may be challenging to lift and manipulate easily.

And while the iron provides much-lauded strength and durability, it can also be prone to rusting if not well maintained. Whether your newer cast-iron skillet has gotten wet and developed a few rust spots or you’ve scored a thoroughly rusty antique skillet at an estate sale, you must remove all the rust with some sturdy steel wool, followed by a repeat of the seasoning process. Using the skillet regularly, re-seasoning it and keeping it dry will keep the rust at bay.

Put off by all this talk of careful maintenance? Consider instead an enameled cast iron skillet. The skillet is still one-piece cast iron but is finished with a baked-on glass enamel coating that removes much of the maintenance onus. Although it lacks the fabled non- or low-stick quality of well-seasoned bare cast iron, enameled cast iron doesn’t require seasoning, won’t rust, can be soaked for cleaning baked-on messes and comes in a variety of colors.

Whether you’re the proud owner of a family heirloom passed down for generations or simply in the market for some new cookware, you can’t go wrong with a cast-iron skillet. Albeit less than carefree, a cast-iron skillet is extremely durable, virtually indestructible and capable of handling almost any cooking task, both indoors and out. Properly used and maintained, your skillet will last a lifetime—perhaps even several others’ lifetimes.
Practically perfect, it’s the little black dress of cookware.

Julianne Puckett develops recipes and writes about food at YankeeKitchenNinja.com. She’s still can’t believe that she compared cast-iron cookware to shag carpeting.

Cousin Sue’s Cast-Iron Skillet Pizza

bharrewyn_skillet_pizza_300dpi-2This recipe is written for a large, 12-inch skillet and requires a 16-ounce ball of pizza dough (readily available at local grocery stores). If your skillet is smaller, simply use a bit less dough. No specific sauces or toppings are listed; those choices are entirely up to you.

Preheat the oven to 475° with the skillet inside.

On a floured work surface, roll and stretch a 16-ounce ball of pizza dough (at room temperature) into about an 11- or 12-inch circle. Place the dough circle on a piece of parchment paper lightly coated with nonstick spray that is wider than the skillet by 4–6 inches on each side. Using a fork, poke the dough with holes every few inches. Dress the pizza with sauce, desired toppings and a blend of shredded mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses.
Carefully remove the skillet from the oven and place on the stovetop. With help from a friend, lift the parchment from all four corners and place the pizza (still on the parchment) carefully into the pan, seating the edges lightly with a fork if necessary.

Bake the pizza for about 4 minutes, then carefully remove the skillet from the oven. With help from a friend, lift the pizza from the skillet using the four corners of the parchment and place it on a large cutting board. Carefully slide … Read More

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Mountain Peak

Founder Jehshua Barnes serving up his chimichurri at a local food show to eager tasters.

Founder Jehshua Barnes serving up his chimichurri at a local food show to eager tasters.

GREEN SAUCE IN THE GREEN MOUNTAINS

Jehshua’s Chimichurri brings a taste
of Argentina to Vermont

BY TROY SHAHEEN| PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRENT HARREWYN

While the Green Mountains might be a world away from the peaks of Patagonia, and the word “chimichurri” might be confused with a bird call around here, Vermonters can now enjoy the green, tangy Argentine condiment thanks to Jehshua’s Chimichurri, the flagship product of the recently established Jehshua’s Specialty Foods in Norwich, VT.

Using ingredients most Vermonters know, love and find locally, Jehshua’s chimichurri blends the familiar into something fresh, exotic and surprising.

Combining parsley, cilantro, olive oil, red wine vinegar, sweet onion, garlic, key lime juice, oregano, sea salt and pepper, founder Jehshua Barnes has carved out a nice niche in Vermont’s specialty food industry and is growing a small business that is poised to expand.

“Chimichurri isn’t something a lot of Vermonters have tried before,” he says, “and they just love it. It’s good for you, it’s versatile and it’s unique.” Traditionally eaten with meats and seafood, Americans enjoy chimichurri on everything from eggs and sandwiches to salads and pizza.

Although Jehshua’s Chimichurri can be found at 20 Vermont co-ops, specialty food stores and restaurants after just a year of business, Barnes insists he never set out to become a condiment entrepreneur. A native of Hanover, NH, he finds himself in Vermont by way of a 15-year acting career in Los Angeles. With appearances in films like Best in Show and Mulholland Drive, not to mention many television commercials and some soap opera roles, Jehshua returned to the Upper Valley just over a year ago and found himself outside of his industry and anxious for more autonomy in his professional life.

“After working for so many years in the film world,” he says, “where you really have so little control and you just go out auditioning over and over, this was a great change for me. It’s something where you have so much more control and you can still be entrepreneurial. You can still run your own thing.” Jehshua, who still travels to Boston for acting gigs, manages all operations, sales and marketing for Jehshua’s Chimichurri, and he spends most of his time traveling the state to give demonstrations and tastings.

When the idea for a Vermont chimichurri was hatched, Barnes sought the guidance of the Vermont Food Venture Center facility, a food and farm incubator in Hardwick that rents out its facilities and provides free consultation to food entrepreneurs. The VFVC helped Barnes churn out his first 10-gallon batch and also aided in the process of securing FDA approval and business development.

“It really has been an amazing resource,” Barnes says. “They helped me get going, not just in providing the facility but with pretty much anything I needed to know. If you have an idea, you can just go there and they’ll get you started.”

Jehshua’s Chimichurri eventually outgrew the incubator, and Barnes relocated to a processing and packaging plant next to Harpoon Brewery in Windsor. He now produces 70 gallons of chimichurri at a time, and is in meetings with representatives from Whole Foods and international importers hoping to get a taste of the Argentine green sauce. The unique nature of the condiment means that many Vermonters have never tasted chimichurri before, making for a relatively easy path to the grocery store shelves when compared to common products like barbecue sauce or hot sauce.

“It’s been a lot of fun to start this here in Vermont,” Barnes says. “I didn’t really plan on it, but this does happen to be the best state in the country for specialty food production.” In addition to the consultations with the Vermont Food Venture Center, Barnes was also a featured entrepreneur at the Shelburne-based venture capital firm Fresh Tracks Capital’s first Road Pitch, a coordinated motorcycle road ride throughout Vermont with stops for startups to pitch their ideas to seasoned investors and executives.

“Everyone I talked to,” says Barnes, “told me that having ‘Made in Vermont’ on your label is the best branding you can get.”

Jehshua’s signature green jar of chimichurri will soon have a complementary counterpart, as Barnes prepares to roll out his second product, a beef bolognese, which he is working on in addition to frequent trips to Boston to appear in an upcoming David O. Russell film. Between the expansion of his specialty foods and his acting career, Barnes finds himself busier than ever. “It’s a fun learning process,” he says, “that’s for sure.”

Troy Shaheen is a freelance writer based in Boston by way of Brattleboro, with an interest in Vermont’s food systems, agriculture and brand. 

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Our Contributors Summer 2014

Belt-Burnier

Linda Belt-Burnier is a freelance editor and writer who lives with her son and her French-chef husband in rural Middlesex, Vermont. She has written for Food & Nutrition, a publication of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and managed publication of a top-ranked nutrition journal. When she hosts their French relatives at their home, she loves to show off the state’s exceptional cheese, breads and, yes, apples, and regularly sends them home with a jug of maple syrup, grade B.

 

ButeuxReadeMaria Buteux Reade transitioned from 27 years as a boarding school teacher and dean to become a working partner at Someday Farm in East Dorset. When not on her tractor turning compost, she writes in an old sugarhouse, happy to share that space with a few cows, some wandering geese and bales of sweet hay. Maria has a home along the Battenkill River in Arlington.

deBros

 

Kathryn deBros is a writer, teacher and maker of things. She lives in Bennington, Vermont, with her husband and beasts. She writes at RainyDaisyLady.blogspot.com.

 

Lazor

Jack Lazor is co-owner of Butterworks Farm with his wife, Anne, and cofounder of the Northern Grain Growers Association. Since 1975, Jack has been growing organic grains in the Northeast Kingdom for both human consumption and dairy feed, and he is considered a leader in the movement for growing grains in cold climates. He lives in Westfield.

McKenna2

 

Emily McKenna is the communications specialist at Skillet Design & Marketing, a food-focused design and marketing firm based in Burlington. Emily is an experienced recipe developer, editor and writer whose work has appeared in EatingWell, Real Simple, Fine Cooking and Food52.com. She lives in central Vermont with her husband, John, and son, Giuseppe.

 

Medeiros3

Tracey Medeiros is a freelance food writer, food stylist, recipe developer and tester. Tracey is the author of The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook (The Countryman Press, May 2013) and Dishing Up Vermont (Storey Publishing, 2008). The Countryman Press will publish her third book, The Connecticut Farm Table Cookbook, due out in 2015. She can be reached at TraceyMedeiros.com or via email at traceymedeiros@comcast.net.

Powers

 

Katie Powers lives in Waterville, Vermont, where she and her partner run a small diversified farm. She is grateful to her mother, who has always insisted that her children eat their vegetables. Katie is a graduate student of creative writing, and her work can be found at KitchenDoorBlog.com.

Sorkin

 

Laura Sorkin is an organic farmer, classically trained cook and food writer. She lives in northwest Vermont with her husband and two children. She can be reached at laurasorkin@myfairpoint.net.

Stultz

 

Natalie Stultz is a Vermont photographer whose editorial and commercial work appears nationally. She blends her unique sense of place and enjoyment of people into every assignment. Her beautiful photographs tell stories that create enthusiasm for business and personal branding.

Sullivan

 

Carol Sullivan is a freelance photographer who lives in Underhill. Carol has a passion for local food—both photographing it and eating it.

Templeton

 

Frederica Templeton is a writer, editor and communications consultant who has tested the world’s cuisines and never found them wanting. She is editorial director of Mansfield/Templeton & Associates in Manchester, Vermont, and can be reached at mansfieldtempleton@gmail.com.

 

Zobel

Sarah Zobel writes profiles and features, primarily on health and wellness and education. Her work has appeared in O, The Oprah Magazine; Utne Reader; Boston Globe Magazine; Vermont Medicine; Scholastic Parent & Child; Best of Burlington; and elsewhere. Visit SarahZobel.com.

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Mountain Peak

Knoll Farm and the
Center for Whole Communities

A Family Farm with Wide Horizons

By Tracey Medeiros | Photo by Brent Harrewy

bharrewyn_knollfarm_300dpi-1-(Mary-Blair's-conflicted-copy-2014-07-11)

Helen Whybrow and Peter Forbes enjoying a stroll.

Helen Whybrow and her husband, Peter Forbes, are the proud owners of Knoll Farm, an organic family-owned business. They grow highbush berries and raise purebred Icelandic sheep for breeding stock, wool and grass-fed meat.

Knoll Farm is also known as the birthplace of the Center for Whole Communities, a nonprofit organization that the couple founded in 2003 and which is now run by Executive Director Ginny McGinn. The Center for Whole Communities offers leadership development retreats that focus on bringing together the environmental and social justice movements. Through their programs and ongoing support, they network with more than 1,500 leaders in 450 organizations and communities throughout 47 states and Canada.

The work of the Center for Whole Communities is to knit together the environmental and social justice movements, nurture leadership and communities, and lend support to other similar-minded organizations from around the country. The mission of the organization is to bring these conversations, revenue streams and ideas together so that there is a more holistic approach to social and environmental change. It is a curriculum that has evolved over a number of years with the help of a great many people from across the country.

“Traditionally, the mainstream environmental movement has been separate from that of social justice. On the one hand, people from the environmental sector are working on issues such as clean water and protecting farmland, while a social justice group might be focused on matters of public health, or the issue of improving food access and food security,” says Helen.

Helen gives an overview of the synergy that has existed between Knoll Farm and the Center for Whole Communities for over a decade:

“We were fortunate enough to find this property through the Vermont Land Trust, but part of our deal in purchasing the land was to offer educational opportunities for the conservation movement as well as to keep it going as a family farm. With Peter’s deep background in land conservation, we began by creating a refuge for conservationists and others working on land issues to come together and think creatively. Soon this evolved into convening those who work primarily on land issues and those working mainly on social issues, and with the help of many talented people from around the country, we built a curriculum that focuses on ways that issues affecting land and issues affecting people could be seen as one lens for improving community health. To have these conversations on a piece of land that is itself attempting to model ecosystem health was an important component of what we were after. The landscape and foodscape of the farm was always a powerful teacher as well as a gracious host for our participants.”

“Peter worked in the conservation movement for a long time. He was the New England director for the Trust for Public Land. Over and over again, he would see that saving, or conserving, a piece of land without the full engagement of the community was basically like putting a Band-Aid on the larger problem of land loss in this country. The whole social engagement aspect of land and nature is central to Peter’s vision for the success of conservation in our country,” explains Helen.

When many people who work in the environmental movement get together to talk about solutions to the larger problem, they often meet in hotels that do not have any windows, or in a conference room with a corporate feel. They are not really connected to the land, or the work that they are doing.

Helen and Peter had the vision of creating a refuge of sorts for environmental activists which would be land based, located on a farm. Participants would be offered food that was grown in the garden, served shortly after it was picked. Knowing that the leaders who came to the farm were working on hard issues, the couple hoped that a setting that felt personally renewing could help people drop into a deeper conversation and set of solutions than they would otherwise find. “This is the ‘why’ of how we began,” explains Helen.

“As we started working with conservationists, we realized that it was very difficult to have a conversation about land in this country, or its protection and access, without addressing the very real issues of power and privilege, race and class. Therefore, our work started to migrate more toward social justice, inclusion, racism and diversity as it plays out around land and leadership, history and identity. We then started to invite people from around the country to our farm who had a great deal of expertise and awareness of these matters to deepen and expand the work beyond where we could go,” says Helen.

The couple’s goal then became about creating a place where hard conversations could happen that were centered on land and its access and equity.

“The work has been very much about raising issues, and generating conversations that get to the core of the social and environmental problems in this country, issues that don’t often get addressed.”

Of particular interest to many visitors to the farm is the flock of horned Icelandic sheep. Helen and Peter started with a small group of the breed approximately 12 years ago, which has now grown to around 70 animals. Icelandic sheep are one of the more ancient breeds and have been bred and farmed in Iceland for almost 1,500 years. They are an ancient, or heritage breed, with unique characteristics. Helen also uses them as a tool for pasture renovation.

“The lambs are born in April and stay with their mothers throughout the summer, going to market at about eight months of age. They are fed only grass and their mother’s milk; we don’t wean them. Our sheep are moved every two to three days, eventually grazing all of the pastures. The areas that they graze are rested long enough to build root mass and soil fertility which has been stimulated by the grazing, and fertilized by the animals. These rugged creatures have many qualities that one would associate with wild sheep. They only come into heat in the fall and both sexes have horns. Icelandic sheep deliver their lambs most often on their own without a lot of problems, or need for assistance, and are very hardy.

“Our barn wasn’t set up for sheep so we wanted to be able to lamb outdoors and not have a breed that was so highly bred that it needed a great amount of help during lambing. Our animals certainly meet these requirements. The females are protective of their young and are extremely good mothers. Another positive is that these self-sufficient animals need very little supplemental feed to thrive and that works with our goals of making the farm a largely closed-loop system without a lot of inputs in the way of grains, fertilizers and so on.”
Knoll Farm raises its Icelandic sheep primarily for breeding stock, and their breeding rams have gone to sheep farms as far away as Alaska and Georgia. Their grass-fed … Read More

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Our Contributors

 

BurdickCorey Burdick is a freelance writer who has spent the past 10 years pursuing her passion for all things food and wine. A graduate of Mount Holyoke College, she has worked as a fine-wine account manager and received her WSET Level 2 certification from the Vermont Wine School. When she isn’t writing or cooking up something delicious with locally sourced foods, you can find her kayaking, running, vintage treasure hunting, roller-skating or puddle jumping, but definitely not camping.

 

Burros

 

Marian Burros wrote about food for the New York Times for 27 years. She lives in Maryland but spends most of the summer in the Northeast Kingdom. The author of 11 cookbooks, in season she does most of her shopping at farm stands and farmers’ markets.

 

ButeuxReadeMaria Buteux Reade transitioned from 27 years as a boarding school teacher and dean to become a working partner at Someday Farm in East Dorset. When not on her tractor turning compost, she writes in an old sugarhouse, happy to share that space with a few cows, some wandering geese and bales of sweet hay. Maria has a home along the Battenkill River in Arlington.

 

 

 

HarrewynBrent Harrewyn takes pride in complementing and exploring Vermont’s culinary landscape with his camera. “It’s a honor to collaborate with and be a part of the local food movement in the Green Mountain State.”
HoverflyPhotography.com

 

 

JacobsonMichele

Michele Jacobson is a certified clinical nutritionist and the author of Just Because You’re An American Doesn’t Mean You Have To Eat Like One!, a book about how to shop for healthy food in the American marketplace and health benefits derived from different cultural diets of the world. She is currently working on a new book about genetically modified foods (GMOs). She divides her time between Jamaica, Vermont and New Jersey. Please visit her website at NutritionPrescription.biz.

 

Fenton.Nicole

Nicole L’Huillier Fenton, co-founder of Skillet Design & Marketing, has extensive experience in food marketing and journalism. In addition to working with a variety of local and national food producers, Fenton was the marketing manager at City Market, Onion River Co-op in Burlington. Fenton recently helped to start one of Vermont’s most successful farmers’ markets, the 5 Corners Farmers’ Market in Essex Junction, where she lives with her husband and son.

 

MaseLisa Masé is a translator, poet, food writer and cooking educator. She works from her experience in healing various conditions with the help of food, herbs and harmonious life choices. She specializes in traditional foods and whole foods for real people. Growing up homesteading in northern Italy taught her that, by honoring food traditions, we restore meaning in our lives and remain connected to the earth that feeds us. Her passion for the language of food urges her to travel and gain experiential knowledge about ways in which people around the globe find their true sources of nourishment.

 

TraceyTracey Medeiros is a freelance food writer, food stylist, recipe developer and tester. Tracey is the author of The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook (The Countryman Press, May 2013) and Dishing Up Vermont (Storey Publishing, 2008). The Countryman Press will publish her third book, The Connecticut Farm Table Cookbook, due out in 2015. She can be reached at TraceyMedeiros.com or via email at traceymedeiros@comcast.net.

 

Nesbit

 

Greg Nesbit is a commercial photographer with a specialty in culinary and hospitality photography. He has a studio in Bennington, Vermont.

 

 

 

EckerOgdenEllenEllen Ecker Ogden writes about food and gardens, and has authored five books including From the Cook’s Garden, The Vermont Cheese Book and The Complete Kitchen Garden. She lectures on kitchen garden designs to inspire gardeners with fresh ideas for how to grow food that is as beautiful as it is delicious. EllenOgden.com

 

 

PowersKatie Powers lives in Waterville, Vermont, where she and her partner run a small diversified farm. She is grateful to her mother, who has always insisted that her children eat their vegetables. Katie is a graduate student of creative writing, and her work can be found at KitchenDoorBlog.com.

 

Templeton

 

Frederica Templeton is a freelance writer, aspiring gardener and indiscriminate reader of cookbooks and recipes who is not afraid to serve something never tried before to unsuspecting guests. She is also the co-founder and editorial director of Yellow Barn Communications in Manchester, Vermont, and can be reached at ftempleton1970(at)gmail(dot)com.

 

 

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Our Contributors

CONTRBUTORS Issue No. 7

 

Lil and Lynne Photo

 

Lynne Christy Anderson is the author of Breaking Bread: Recipes and Stories from Immigrant Kitchens.  She divides her time between Boston, Massachusetts and the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont and teaches writing at Boston College and Vermont’s Table, a food studies program at Sterling College in Craftsbury.   

Lilly Anderson is a student at Boston Latin School.  During part of the year, she lives off-the-grid in East Craftsbury, Vermont where she enjoys photographing the farms, food, and people of the area.   

 

Burdick

Corey Burdick is a freelance writer who has spent the past 10 years pursuing her passion for all things food and wine. She is a graduate of Mount Holyoke College who has worked as a fine-wine account manager and received her WSET Level 2 certification from the Vermont Wine School. When she isn’t writing or cooking up something delicious with locally sourced foods, you can find her kayaking, running, vintage treasure hunting, roller-skating or puddle jumping, but definitely not camping.

 

Davis

Chris Davis is a freelance food and travel writer who spent 29 years as an editor and executive in the publishing industry and seven years in the restaurant business, traveling the world in search of a food he doesn’t like (still looking). Chris lives just north of Boston, where he can generally be found eating, growing, planning, preparing or dreaming about his next meal.

 

EckerOgdenEllen

Ellen Ecker Ogden writes about food and gardens, and has authored five books including From the Cook’s Garden, The Vermont Cheese Book and The Complete Kitchen Garden. She lectures on kitchen garden designs to inspire gardeners with fresh ideas for how to grow food that is as beautiful as it is delicious.  Visit EllenOgden.com.

 

Halloran

 

Amy Halloran lives on eight city lots with her sons, husband and seven hens.  She writes about the changing foodscape for regional and national outlets.  Her work is archived at AmyHalloran.net

 

 

Jennings

 

Holly Jennings is a freelance writer, editor and recipe developer, and co-author of the book Asian Cocktails. She is the founder of DowdyCornersCookbookClub.com, a club and blog devoted to gathering folks around the table via cooking, reading and supporting local farmers. Her recipes and writing have appeared in the Boston Globe and The Art of Eating

  

McKenna2 

Emily McKenna is the marketing manager at Skillet Design & Marketing, a food-focused design and marketing agency, in Burlington, Vermont. She is a trained cook and former magazine editor living in the Mad River Valley with her son, Giuseppe, and husband, John.

 

 

TraceyTracey Medeiros is a freelance food writer, food stylist, recipe developer and tester.  Tracey is the author of The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook (The Countryman Press, May 2013) and Dishing Up Vermont (Storey Publishing, 2008).  The Countryman Press will publish her third book, The Connecticut Farm Table Cookbook due out in 2015.  She can be reached at:  TraceyMedeiros.com or via e-mail at: traceymedeiros@comcast.net.

 

Powers

 

Katie Powers lives in Waterville, Vermont, where she and her partner run a small diversified farm. She is grateful to her mother, who has always insisted that her children eat their vegetables. Katie is a graduate student of creative writing, and her work can be found at kitchendoorblog.com.

 

puckettjulianne

 

Julianne Puckett is a blogger and freelance writer who left an IT career in Southern suburbia to return to her New England roots. A graduate of Mount Holyoke College, she lives with her husband and two rescue dogs on a “farmette” in Jericho, where she tries to develop ever more inventive ways to prevent deer from destroying her garden. She blogs at YankeeKitchenNinja.com.

 

 

Charlie Ritzo is from Barre, Vermont and attended Muhlenberg College in Pennsylvania where he concentrated in photography.  An internship gave him the opportunity to work on cookbooks where he developed his love for food photography.

Sorkin 

Laura Sorkin is an organic farmer, classically trained cook and food writer. She lives in northwest Vermont with her husband and two children. She can be reached at laurasorkin@myfairpoint.net.

 

 

Sullivan

 

 

Carol Sullivan is a freelance photographer who lives in Underhill. Carol has a passion for local food—both photographing it and eating it.

 

 

Templeton

 

Frederica Templeton is a freelance writer, aspiring gardener and indiscriminate reader of cookbooks and recipes who is not afraid to serve something never tried before to unsuspecting guests. She is also the co-founder and editorial director of Yellow Barn Communications in Manchester, Vermont, and can be reached at ftempleton1970@gmail.com.

 

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OUR CONTRIBUTORS

 

Allen

 

Nathan Allen trained as a Chef at Johnson & Wales University in Rhode Island and in the kitchens of Paris, France. More recently he has been writing for The Mountain Times newspaper in Killington and other publications about food, skiing, and community events. He lives in Rutland with his wife

 

Baughman

Sarah Baughman writes from Newport, Vermont, where she lives with her husband and two children and works as a school publications coordinator. Originally from Michigan, she’s finding her place in the Green Mountain food scene with chickens, a garden, and a basement full of canning jars.

 

BeltBunierLindaBioPicLinda Belt-Burnier is a freelance editor and writer who lives with her son and her French-chef husband in rural Middlesex, Vermont. She has written for Food & Nutrition, a publication of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and managed publication of a top-ranked nutrition journal. When she hosts their French relatives at their home, she loves to show off the state’s exceptional cheese, breads, and, yes, apples, and regularly sends them home with a jug of maple syrup, grade B.  

 

 

BurdickCorey Burdick is a freelance writer who has spent the past 10 years pursuing her passion for all things food and wine. She is a graduate of Mount Holyoke College who has worked as a fine-wine account manager and received her WSET Level 2 certification from the Vermont Wine School. When she isn’t writing or cooking up something delicious with locally sourced foods, you can find her kayaking, running, vintage treasure hunting, roller-skating or puddle jumping, but definitely not camping.

DooleyKristy

 

Kristy Dooley is a natural light, on location photographer specializing in Portraits, Food, Fine Art, and Macro Photography.

 

Harrewyn

 

Brent Harrewyn takes pride in complementing and exploring Vermont’s culinary landscape with his camera. “It’s an honor to collaborate with and be a part of the local food movement in the Green Mountain State.” HoverflyPhotography.com

 

 

 

L'HuillierFentonNicole L’Huillier Fenton co-founder of Skillet Design & Marketing, has extensive experience in food marketing and journalism. In addition to working with a variety of local and national food producers, Fenton was the marketing manager at City Market, Onion River Co-op in Burlington. Fenton recently helped to start one of Vermont’s most successful farmers markets, the 5 Corners Farmers Market in Essex Junction, where she lives with her husband and son.

 

Medeiros3Tracey Medeiros is a freelance food writer, food stylist, recipe developer and tester. Tracey is the author of Dishing Up Vermont (Storey Publishing, 2008). Countryman Press will publish her second book, The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook, this spring. She can be reached at TraceyMedeiros.com or via email at traceymedeiros(at)comcast(dot)net.

meuniernathan

 

Nathan Meunier is a craft beer geek, author, and freelance writer living in Shaftsbury. He primarily covers video games and tech for publications like Mac|Life, IGN, GameSpot, and Official Xbox Magazine, among many others, but he’s still a country dude at heart.”

 

Nesbit

 

Gregory Nesbit is a commercial photographer with a specialty in culinary and hospitality photography. He has a studio in Bennington, VT.

 

 

 

 

PowersKatie Powers lives in Waterville, Vermont, where she and her partner run a small diversified farm. She is grateful to her mother, who has always insisted that her children eat their vegetables. Katie is a graduate student of creative writing, and her work can be found at kitchendoorblog.com.

 

puckettjulianne

 

Julianne Puckett is a blogger and freelance writer who left an IT career in Southern suburbia to return to her New England roots. A graduate of Mount Holyoke College, she lives with her husband and two rescue dogs on a “farmette” in Jericho, where she tries to develop ever more inventive ways to prevent deer from destroying her garden. She blogs at www.yankeekitchenninja.com.

 

Schimoler

 

Kristen Schimoler graduated from Cornell University with a degree in food science in 2008 and later returned to her home state of Vermont to pursue a “dream job” at Ben & Jerry’s. She is a product developer of new innovation at Ben & Jerry’s, focusing on implementing Values-Led Sourcing initiatives such as Fair Trade. When not creating new ice cream, Kirsten enjoys yoga, snowboarding, cooking and entertaining and seeking out new trends and flavors.

 

SorkinLaura Sorkin is an organic farmer, classically trained cook and food writer. She lives in northwest Vermont with her husband and two children. She can be reached at laurasorkin(at)myfairpoint(dot)net.

 

Sullivan

 

Carol Sullivan is a freelance photographer who lives in Underhill. Carol has a passion for local food—both photographing it and eating it.

 

TempletonFrederica Templeton is a freelance writer, aspiring gardener and indiscriminate reader of cookbooks and recipes who is not afraid to serve something never tried before to unsuspecting guests. She is also the co-founder and editorial director of Yellow Barn Communications in Manchester, Vermont, and can be reached at ftempleton1970(at)gmail(dot)com.

 

Zobel

 

Sarah Zobel writes profiles and features, primarily on health and wellness and education. Her work has appeared in O, The Oprah Magazine; Utne Reader; Boston Globe Magazine; Vermont Medicine; Scholastic Parent & Child; Best of Burlington; and elsewhere. Visit SarahZobel.com.

 

 

 

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CINDERELLA PUMPKIN DIP

pumpkin dipThis dip takes its name from the variety of pumpkin used. Cinderella is an heirloom that is a beautiful deep burnt orange color with a flattened, squished pumpkin shape. This dip is very similar to guacamole! It was a fun recipe I developed for a wedding once in which the only nonlocal ingredients were olive oil, spices and salt. I needed a vegan dip that utilized only things from that farm’s September harvest. I like to use one pumpkin for the dip and another one to serve it in.

Yields about 2 cups of dip

  • ½ of a medium-sized Cinderella pumpkin (about 1 pound), peeled, seeded and cut into 3-inch cubes
  • 1 small Cinderella pumpkin, hollowed out, ready to fill
  • 1 clove fresh garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 teaspoon salt, plus more for sprinkling
  • 1 teaspoon fresh cumin
  • ½ teaspoon or several grinds fresh pepper
  • 1 teaspoon vinegar (I like sherry, maple or apple cider varieties best for this recipe)
  • Pita bread for dipping

Sprinkle the pumpkin with salt and roast in the oven until very tender; let come to room temperature. Put pumpkin, garlic, salt, cumin, pepper and vinegar in food processor to purée. Use a bit of water to get a nice consistency for dip. Check seasonings, and then fill into hollowed pumpkin. Serve with fresh pita bread or tortilla chips.

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EDIBLE GREEN MOUNTAINS WRITERS’ GUIDELINES

Thank you for your interest in writing for Edible Green Mountains. We are a member of Edible Communities, a growing, award-winning, national network of community-based food publications whose mission is to transform the way communities shop for, cook, eat and think about food that is grown and produced in their area. To read more about Edible Communities go to www.edible communities.com

Edible Green Mountains is a quarterly magazine that emphasizes the current season by celebrating the abundance of local food and wine throughout Vermont. Edible Green Mountains has a loyal following of readers who are interested in: eating delicious locally grown seasonal food; getting to know the people who grow, produce, cook and sell those foods; in terms of great dining, day trips, food events and festivals, great books to read and products to try. We look for subjects that are timely and traditional, and we have special interest in topics that relate to the full breadth of our mission.

We rely on freelance writers for the majority of our stories and departments. Writers generally generate their own topics or, in some cases, the editor can make assignments based on writers’ interests and knowledge. The primary qualification for contributors is an ability to write in a lively, elegant, informative, accurate and interesting manner. We are looking for tightly written articles with an original voice that will engage and inform our readers.

Recipes are highly desirable, but they must be original and carefully tested (testing conducted by EGM’s Editor.) Recipes that are not original, permission to reprint must be obtained and paid for by the submitter. Please note all sources for information in the article should be cited, and if passages from published (including Web published) material are included, permission for use must be obtained.

Department stories range from 500 – 800 words. Our departments include Edible Season -recipes from local chefs, gardeners and farmers; tips on cooking with the season and what to do with our bounty of produce; At the Table- an inside look at a professional chef or locally owned restaurant that brings food from farm to plate; Liquid Assets – we examine the art and science of beverages from age-old cocktails to microbrews; From the Good Earth-we profile the unique farmers, foragers and forward thinking farm businesses and local artisans that work diligently to provide us with local products; Notable Edible – the latest food related finds from the region, tips on where to eat, shop for kitchen gadgets and find ingredients ; Worth the trip – a series of day trips that lead to memorable culinary discoveries.

Feature stories range from 700 – 2000 words. Topics include an in-depth exploration of local ingredient, a farm or farmer profile or food related experience. Examples include making and canning jam, appreciating honey bees, to local school gardens that supplement fresh food in their cafeteria.

If you have a story that you think would work well for Edible Green Mountains please submit a query outlining the subject matter and focus of the article. Potential EGM writers should also submit mission related writing samples along with a brief biography detailing their interests, professional and educational background, and publishing experience. We prefer all inquiries by email with attachments using Microsoft Word.

Info@ediblegreenmountains.com

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